Google begins building out 1Gbps Internet to two U.S. cities

By on February 7, 2012, 5:30 PM

As promised, Google is beginning to build out Google Fiber in two cities: Kansas City, Kansas and Kansas City, Missouri. When completed, the new city-wide networks will tether citizens to a fiber-optic backbone capable of delivering 1Gbps Internet to tens of thousands -- if not hundreds of thousands -- of people.

Google says it has measured utility poles, studied maps, surveyed neighborhoods and eaten way too much barbecue -- but the company has since completed its planning phase and is now stringing thousands of miles of fiber-optic cabling along telephone poles.

There is no word how much a Google Fiber subscription will run, but the company claims it will be offered at a "competitive price" to as many as 500,000 people.

At 1Gbps, Google Fiber is unlike any other Internet plan offered to residential customers in the United States. It will be 10 to 20 times faster than competing fiber-based services, like Verizon's FiOS, and more than 100 times faster than the typical household connection most Americans enjoy.

Kansas City -- both of them -- were hand-picked by Google based on a number of criteria, including a plethora of personal appeals they received from over a thousand cities nationwide. To catch the search giant's attention, cities performed a number of gimmicky publicity stunts like promising to tattoo their mayor and even renaming the cities themselves to Google. In one instance, the company even returned the favor and temporarily rebranded itself "Topeka" for April Fools' Day.

The U.S. is often criticized for lagging behind other countries when it comes to broadband proliferation, speed and price. In September, we reported that the U.S. was ranked 26th by Pando Networks in terms of broadband speed.




User Comments: 27

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Raswan Raswan said:

Arris said:

Build out?

Having trouble recognizing English? "Build out" is a perfectly acceptable, grammatically correct phrase.

Guest said:

"Build out" is American for "Build", because it's not good enough to describe the activity they also need to know where it takes place.

Guest said:

How will their pricing be competitive when no one else offers that kind of speed in the U.S.?

Guest said:

But Verizon is talking about 1 Terabit. >.>

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sen6Zvmm-SA

ikesmasher said:

Google has enough money to put these cables everywhere, lol...

altecmayank said:

Why is Google getting into the internet provider business?

Guest said:

Because its business and it will be cheaper than cable or other rip-off companies. Customers will knock on their door in droves... you'll see... :)

Staff
Rick Rick, TechSpot Staff, said:

altecmayank said:

Why is Google getting into the internet provider business?

Google often does things to harbor good will, so that's probably part of it.

Also, by throwing unreasonable amounts of money and engineers at mass-scale fiber deployment, Google may be able to improve such future roll outs. Those improvements may encourage other companies to finally deploy their own last-mile fiber networks.

As people begin using faster Internet connections, theoretically, they can get more stuff done (ie. visit more websites and/or use websites they couldn't before). Theoretically, Google profits from this because that means they get to show you more ads. I'm not so sure about the pay off, but it's something to tell investors.

Google said:

Our goal is to experiment with new ways to help make Internet access better and faster for everyone. Here are some specific things that we have in mind:

* Next generation apps: We want to see what developers and users can do with ultra high-speeds, whether it's creating new bandwidth-intensive "killer apps" and services, or other uses we can't yet imagine.

* New deployment techniques: We'll test new ways to build fiber networks, and to help inform and support deployments elsewhere, we'll share key lessons learned with the world.

* Openness and choice: We'll operate an "open access" network, giving users the choice of multiple service providers. And consistent with our past advocacy, we'll manage our network in an open, non-discriminatory and transparent way.

Guest said:

I'm so excited! I hope they build it out throughout the US!!

tw0rld tw0rld said:

The money you must have to do this is incredible. I don't see how their price can be competitive.

Arris Arris said:

Having trouble recognizing English? "Build out" is a perfectly acceptable, grammatically correct phrase.

Just an unusual use of it, never seen it before in my life. In the UK we usually use the term "roll out", which I guess could be just as strange if you had never seen it used before. Having no trouble recognising English, thanks for your concern.

"Build out" is American for "Build", because it's not good enough to describe the activity they also need to know where it takes place.

Thanks Guest.

tonylukac said:

Make it for the masses. Just like thief self driving car. Where is it?

Staff
Jesse Jesse said:

altecmayank said:

Why is Google getting into the internet provider business?

They aren't actually going to be an ISP. As Rick pointed out, they said the following:

* Openness and choice: We'll operate an "open access" network, giving users the choice of multiple service providers. And consistent with our past advocacy, we'll manage our network in an open, non-discriminatory and transparent way.

gamerex said:

One.. one GIGABIT per second? That translates to a download rate of 128 megabyte per second! (Assuming the servers on the other end support it, of course)..(And even hard drives aren't that fast)..(Unless I did my math wrong somewhere)

3DCGMODELER 3DCGMODELER said:

Oh thats part of the fiber optics cable servers to accomodate the fast fiber connections.

herpaderp said:

gamerex said:

128 megabyte per second...

125MB/s would be the theoretical max, but due to overhead (network + system), realistically, it'd be quite a bit less than that.

Guest said:

And here I was happy with my 15Mbit VDSL2+ ....hum

Guest said:

Why not start in the silicon valley where their home is? What the heck is in Kansas and Missouri? Do they even have computers? I live in the silicon valley and we're always getting the short end of the stick!

Rasta211 said:

I wonder what the bandwidth cap and throttling will be like.

spydercanopus spydercanopus said:

Will move for Gbps

TJGeezer said:

Guest said:

"Build out" is American for "Build", because it's not good enough to describe the activity they also need to know where it takes place.

Right! Or... could it describe a process? Like, at a guess, first you build a central facility capable of handling the traffic and then, working outward, you hook up areas of the city, the region, the continent, the world? Nah. That'd make too much sense and has no implied witless criticism of American technical usage.

Brock Kane said:

This will hopefully put some pressure on the biggest rip off broadband company - Comcrap!

I hope Google brings Comcast to their knees!

Comcast wants $200 a month for 100meg speed in Michigan! What an "effing" joke!

DAOWAce DAOWAce said:

To catch the search giant's attention, cities performed a number of gimmicky publicity stunts like promising to tattoo their mayor and even renaming the cities themselves to Google. In one instance, the company even returned the favor and temporarily rebranded itself "Topeka" for April Fools' Day.

Because this relates in any way to the need for incredibly high speed residential internet connections?

Wish they tested it around here, I'd actually use the bandwidth for worthwhile things.. if it's upload. It is also upload, right?

Guest said:

yes-yes, I will **** comcast if they don't pull-out their limits because even with 100mbps you can run over 250GB because when I watch 720p or even 1080 videos (movies) online and their size is big. Ok, what is about families where there are more than 1 child and they plays, watch and so on. Example, a family with 5 people (mother, father and three children). Now, I will take children because they are active online. If one of them will spent like 1GB per 2 hour and the total dayily time is 8 hour than 4GB multiple by 3 and its equal to 12GB per day just for kids! Lets say parent sometimes watch movies with 1080p (one movies as I know is minimum 6GB or like that, however, 10GB is well! So, 10 movies a month is already 100GB plus 12Gb multiple by 30 = 360GB (360GB is already for three active kids). Lets say the parents do something else and lets give them 20GB for each. So, 100GB+40GB+360GB= 140GB+360GB=500GB is minimum with HD (360) movies) even without it, they have already passed the 250GB limit!

******* comcats and At&T.

Guest said:

Usually, I would've corrected your terrible spelling and grammar but it was just too much!

Anyway, why are Google doing this? Don't be evil!

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