Average broadband speed in the US up 28%, South Korea still far ahead

By on April 24, 2013, 11:30 AM

Akamai has published its “State of the Internet” report for the last quarter of 2012 today, offering an overview of broadband speeds per country as well as figures on denial of service attacks, among other interesting metrics. According to the report, average global connection speeds rose 5 percent to 2.9 Mbps during the quarter, with South Korea, Japan and Hong Kong still leading the charts at 14, 10.8 and 9.3Mbps respectively.

The United States was ranked in eighth place with an average speed of 7.4 Mbps. Although still trailing Asian countries by a fair bit, that’s actually a 2.3 percent jump sequentially and 28 percent year-over-year, good enough to break into the top ten by moving up from 12th place last quarter to 8th.

As far as average peak connection speeds are concerned, which more closely represent the peak speed that an internet connection is capable of reaching, Hong Kong held on to the top spot at 57.5 mbps with South Korea trailing them at 49.2Mbps. The US jumped from an average peak of 28.7Mbps to 32.7Mbps in Q4 2012.

The report also looks at mobile connections, where Akamai noted an average connection speed of 4.5Mbps and average peak of 16.6Mbps in the U.S. Most of the company’s smartphone web data in the U.S. came from Android  Webkit users (35.3 percent), followed by Apple Mobile Safari (32.6 percent), though when taking Wi-Fi connections into account Apple led with 58.7 percent of requests versus to 21.7 percent for Android Webkit.

Overall, mobile data traffic around the world grew 28 percent in Q4 and doubled year-over-year.

Lastly, Akamai also took a closer look at DDoS attacks with the help of 19 different cybersecurity and law enforcement agencies around the world. Unsurprisingly, China is the source of 41 percent of all of the cyber attacks in the world in the fourth quarter of 2012 -- that's more than the rest of the top ten combined -- with the US coming in second at 10 percent and Turkey in third place with 4.7 percent.

Attack traffic concentration increased very slightly from the third quarter of 2012, but looking at the whole year customers reported 768 DDoS attacks, a full 200 percent year-over-year increase.

As one of the world’s largest Internet content delivery networks, responsible for serving between 15 and 20 percent of all web traffic, Akamai is able to gather massive amounts of information on many metrics. You can check out their State of the Internet report for insights on other areas like broadband adoption, network connectivity/ availability/ latency problems, iPv6 growth/ transition, and other traffic patterns across the web.




User Comments: 14

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freythman freythman said:

Well, let's just hope that Google is able to do a mass deployment of its Fiber service and help us climb the broadband ladder.

Lionvibez said:

Well, let's just hope that Google is able to do a mass deployment of its Fiber service and help us climb the broadband ladder.

With all the C**k blocking at the state level and cable monopolies its going to be difficult to really expand the service.

And I'm canadian so the service will never be available to me but we all feel the pain of the current system.

2 people like this | Burty117 Burty117, TechSpot Chancellor, said:

And the UK wasn't even mentioned... Lol

JC713 JC713 said:

Good progress. The emergence of 4K will push this to 50% I hope.

Guest said:

The most informative data to produce is median internet speeds, not average.

One 100 G link blows the stats. Can those be obtained and posted, please?

RogerWilco

Relic Relic, TechSpot Chancellor, said:

Well, let's just hope that Google is able to do a mass deployment of its Fiber service and help us climb the broadband ladder.

Doubt they will, they'll cover a few markets and be done.

The most informative data to produce is median internet speeds, not average.

One 100 G link blows the stats. Can those be obtained and posted, please?

Sure would, that's why we won't be seeing them :P .

In me mean time, we'll keep dealing with this http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ilMx7k7mso .

soldier1969 soldier1969 said:

Live in the Southern US and get 110mbs down 25 up so well above average here.

hahahanoobs hahahanoobs said:

Thankfully we don't need >5Mbps for online gaming or 720p streaming.

Skidmarksdeluxe Skidmarksdeluxe said:

South Africa is 128th in the world yet we have a fat submarine cable right on our doorsteps. Go figure.

Emexrulsier said:

And the UK wasn't even mentioned... Lol

The problem with the UK is the bulk of the infrastructure was installed by BT is consists mainly of copper. The copper was originally designed to transmit data at an average speed of 9.6kbps. It's a costly venture to upgrade and no single entity is willing to take on this task as the return is many years if at all.

Burty117 Burty117, TechSpot Chancellor, said:

The problem with the UK is the bulk of the infrastructure was installed by BT is consists mainly of copper. The copper was originally designed to transmit data at an average speed of 9.6kbps. It's a costly venture to upgrade and no single entity is willing to take on this task as the return is many years if at all.

well you say that but I'm getting 80Mbps down and 20mbps up? I really don't think its the copper, besides, I think BT have said nearly 80% of its infrastructure has fiber anyway? either FTTC or the much rarer FTTH.

Its more of the fact the UK has "sweet spots" where broadband is insanely good either through Virgin Fiber or BT fiber (or one of the other random ISP's who use BT as a back bone) and the rest are left behind.

Its a shame when you consider the UK isn't particularly big, the amount of cable that needs laying is nothing compared to what I would bet America has to lay.

1 person liked this | Gopal Bhat Gopal Bhat said:

The problem with the UK is the bulk of the infrastructure was installed by BT is consists mainly of copper. The copper was originally designed to transmit data at an average speed of 9.6kbps. It's a costly venture to upgrade and no single entity is willing to take on this task as the return is many years if at all.

well you say that but I'm getting 80Mbps down and 20mbps up? I really don't think its the copper, besides, I think BT have said nearly 80% of its infrastructure has fiber anyway? either FTTC or the much rarer FTTH.

Its more of the fact the UK has "sweet spots" where broadband is insanely good either through Virgin Fiber or BT fiber (or one of the other random ISP's who use BT as a back bone) and the rest are left behind.

Its a shame when you consider the UK isn't particularly big, the amount of cable that needs laying is nothing compared to what I would bet America has to lay.

I'm on the same package. Our area got fibre around 1 yr ago & we just had it installed.

Plusnet (rebranded BT Infinity) 80 down & 20 up FTTC.

Getting 73Mb down & 18 Mb up of throughput so very good. Especially when coming from ADSL2 13Mb down & 1Mb up.

I can download a 1080p movie in 20 mins if I hog all the download bandwidth

I guess I'm lucky to be in one of the sweet spots.

1 person liked this | Burty117 Burty117, TechSpot Chancellor, said:

I'm on the same package. Our area got fibre around 1 yr ago & we just had it installed.

Plusnet (rebranded BT Infinity) 80 down & 20 up FTTC.

Getting 73Mb down & 18 Mb up of throughput so very good. Especially when coming from ADSL2 13Mb down & 1Mb up.

I can download a 1080p movie in 20 mins if I hog all the download bandwidth

I guess I'm lucky to be in one of the sweet spots.

you came from 13Mb down and 1Mb up! your lucky!

I came from 4Mb down and 0.3Mb up

Sweet spots are nice, but man does it make living in them expensive.

go up north for a 3 hour drive and the houses get bigger but the prices almost halve!

1 person liked this | St1ckM4n St1ckM4n said:

And the UK wasn't even mentioned... Lol

Neither was Australia hahahahha. Perhaps we're looking at the wrong end of the results?

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