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Soundcard & Speakers tweak guide

Turtle Beach Santa Cruz

Note – The Videologic SonicFury is a Turtle Beach Santa Cruz & as such it’s recommended that you use the Santa Cruz Drivers with them, as these will be updated first. Click on Start, Settings, Control Panel then open the Santa Cruz/SonicFury applet.

Speaker Mode. From the drop down menu here you should select your Audio output mode as appropriate. The 3 settings available for Headphones merely refer to which output jack you wish to use. The Back Panel Connections image will change accordingly with the Speaker Mode that you’ve selected. This display will help ensure you have your cables connected to the correct jacks.

Versa Jack. In most instances you shouldn't need to change this setting, as the In/Output mode here will be determined by your Speaker Mode selection.

Record Source. You can ignore this setting until you wish to record audio with your Soundcard. Select the appropriate input source from the drop-down menu here whenever you do intend to record. In the Mixer tab ensure that the Record source isn’t muted out too of course.

Pan L/R. This slider can be used to adjust the volume balance between the Left & Right speakers. This is particularly useful if your speakers are not placed equidistant from you. Should you find audio output from one side to seem weaker than the other try changing the position of the slider bar over to the affected side. Otherwise you should leave this set in the Middle.

Fade F/B. This slider can be used to adjust the volume balance between the Front & Rear speakers. This is particularly useful if your speakers are not placed equidistant from you. Should you find audio output from the front/rear seems weaker/lower than the other try moving the position of the slider bar towards the effected speakers. Otherwise you should leave this set in the Middle.

Master Volume. Use the slider bar here to set the global volume level for Audio output. Move this slider to Up to increase the global volume level & vice versa. It is generally recommended that you set these to 70% or thereabouts if you intend to adjust the EQ settings (in the EQ tab), this will reduce the amount of amplification the Soundcard can apply to a source, which could cause audio artefacts at higher levels. Although should you not intend to be adjust the EQ settings then you should be able to increase the volume level to a much greater level without compromising quality. This setting is of course affected by the volume level you’ve set your speakers too, so you may need to adjust the volume level of your speakers as well.

Virtual 5.1. Available in 6 Speaker output mode, this is a rather complicated option. If you’re connected to a Speaker system which requires a separate Subwoofer input, e.g. Videologic DigiTheatre LC, you’ll only normally get Subwoofer output via the LFE Channel of AC-3/DTS content in 6 Speaker mode. With this option Ticked the Santa Cruz will generate Bass frequencies from the Front channels & output them to the Subwoofer. On such Speaker systems this will be the only way to generate Subwoofer output during Audio playback, bar that of the LFE channel as previously mentioned. As such it is highly recommended to enable this with such systems. Though now the Centre channel must be considered.

In Virtual 5.1 mode the Centre channel will be generated from both the Front & Rear Speakers & outputted to the Centre Speaker. This isn’t too much of an issue for playback of Stereo sources such as CDs & MP3s. Since the release of the 4142 Build WDM Drivers this feature (Virtual 5.1) will be automatically disabled for any 6 channel content, e.g. Multi-channel wave files, which is a good thing as the source will be played back as created.

However, should you play Games with DirectSound 3D enabled (As such this applies to all DirectSound 3D extensions, e.g. EAX) to maintain the integrity of the 3D Audio positioning it is recommended that you mute the Centre Speaker (Given that it is a mix of both Front & Rear channels). This way you will gain Bass output with your Subwoofer & not lose any 3D positioning quality by muting the Centre channel in Games.

Some also recommend swapping around the Versa Jack connectors so that you can gain improved Subwoofer output. Though be sure to re-connect them as originally intended if you’re going to play true 6 channel content, e.g. AC-3/DTS decoded by a Software DVD decoder, otherwise these multi-channel audio sources will be outputted to the incorrect Speakers, e.g. in the case of AC-3/DTS track the Centre would be wrongly sent to the Subwoofer & LFE would be wrongly sent to the Centre Speaker.

Centre. This setting is available when 6 Speaker mode is selected. This slider bar controls the volume level of the Centre channel. Move this slider to the Right to increase the Centre channels volume level & vice versa. This volume level is set proportionately to your Master Volume level. Many Speaker systems with a Centre speaker include an externally adjustable volume control for the Centre channel. You should adjust the Centre volume level until it is equal to that of the other channels.

Sub (LFE). This setting is available when 6 Speaker mode is selected. This slider bar controls the volume level of the Subwoofer. Move this slider to the Right to increase the volume level & vice versa. Most Speaker systems with Subwoofers also include an external volume control for the Subwoofer. I'd recommend adjusting these levels until the Subwoofer is at about 1/3 the maximum Volume level, e.g. Set the external control to 1/3 & set this slider to the maximum or whatever combination you prefer. Although you may prefer to set the Higher/Lower depending on your own preferences for bass output.

In the Mixer tab you can independently adjust the Volume/Balance levels for different sources.

In the EQ tab you can adjust the level of amplification for a variety of a variety of audio frequency ranges. Comprising the Bass (250Hz – 20Hz), Mid (250Hz - 6kHz) & Treble (6kHz - 20kHz) ranges, this allows far greater tuning capabilities than most other Soundcards, which generally offer only basic Tone Control. Adjusting these frequencies can noticeably improve Audio quality for many sources; although this is largely dependant on the Audio source itself (Some may benefit from more Bass, other Treble, etc.). I'd recommend selecting from one of the Presets available then try adjusting the sliders independently until you discover the best sounding positions for yourself.

 



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