Apple thinks only its techs are competent enough to fix iPhones

Cal Jeffrey

TS Evangelist
Staff member

Back in February, we reported how Nebraska had introduced a bill that would make it easier for citizens and independent repair shops to fix broken iPhones. Similar legislation has been introduced in seven other states: Illinois, Kansas, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New York, Tennessee, and Wyoming.

In March, Apple and AT&T went to court in Nebraska opposing the “right-to-repair” bill. The companies cited safety concerns as reasons for their opposition to the law. The corporations and other lobbyists, such as John Deere, claim that if passed, the bill would put consumers at significant risk of bodily injury such as “cuts from a broken screen” or “burns from a mishandled lithium-ion battery.”

The introduction of the legislation is a “shotgun approach” initiated by lobbyists for Repair.org. Their hope is that at least one of these states will pass the bill. If that happens, it may "pressure manufacturers to cede the legal point," thus making it law de facto nationwide.

In 2012, that is exactly what happened with a similar right-to-repair law for automobiles that passed in Massachusetts. If laws like this pass in one state, then the corporations often give up the fight because it becomes too burdensome.

"If they’re concerned about exploding batteries, put warning labels on them and tell consumers how to replace them safely.”

The latest confrontation has been in New York where companies like phone insurance company Asurion, plus others like Toyota and Caterpillar are taking up the battle. According to Digital Trends, “Since the beginning of 2017, these companies have spent upwards of $366,000 to maintain pressure on state lawmakers” to throw the bill out.

To some, the excuses that consumers could “hurt themselves” is just a way to raise concern over public safety and that the real motivation is to monopolize the repair industry.

Repair.org executive director Gay Gordon-Byrne said that if they really wanted to ensure public safety, “they should want to give people as much information about how to deal with a hazardous thing as they can. If they’re concerned about exploding batteries, put warning labels on them and tell consumers how to replace them safely.”

It is also important to remember that it is not all about the consumer repairing their own phones. Right-to-repair laws would allow professional technicians, who are highly skilled at making these types of repairs, access to the parts, tools, and documentation that they need to fix the devices the right way.

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Mc128k

TS Enthusiast
Apple wants everyone to believe that only Apple folks have the intelligence to know how to do anything. Arrogant jerks.
No, it's just actually easier to believe. I think Apple just wants to keep the monopoly and is primarily interested in having a simple support model. There arise many problems if repairs are done outside apple stores, and they have a negative impact on customer experience (and maybe... monetary income too, as satisfaction with apple products decreases)
 

hahahanoobs

TS Evangelist
Apple wants everyone to believe that only Apple folks have the intelligence to know how to do anything. Arrogant jerks.
There arise many problems if repairs are done outside apple stores, and they have a negative impact on customer experience (and maybe... monetary income too, as satisfaction with apple products decreases)
No. Phone repair would be no different than car repair and those shops haven't vanished yet have they? And think, one bad phone could kill you, but a malfunctioning car could kill you, everyone inside and anyone you hit.

Apple is just being Apple.
 

Mc128k

TS Enthusiast
No. Phone repair would be no different than car repair and those shops haven't vanished yet have they? And think, one bad phone could kill you, but a malfunctioning car could kill you, everyone inside and anyone you hit.

Apple is just being Apple.
Car repair actually seems to be becoming like apple products. More and more involvement of the vendor.
I'm not talking from the point of view of a consumer, but also somebody who works inside that industry. I can't repair iPhones, but I clearly understand why.
 

Greg S

TS Evangelist
Car repair actually seems to be becoming like apple products. More and more involvement of the vendor.
I'm not talking from the point of view of a consumer, but also somebody who works inside that industry. I can't repair iPhones, but I clearly understand why.
The only reason manufacturers are offering the first few years of maintenance included is purely for profit reasons. They know darn well their vehicles don't need much done for the first 3 years but can charge you an extra $2000 for $500 worth of work. Even if something does go wrong, it's still not very expensive to replace parts when you don't have to pay any markup on them as the manufacturer.
 
Louis Rossmann has some good thoughts on this. I recommend watching some of he's youtube stuff if you want to hear from someone who actually repairs apple products.
 
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liammac002

TS Enthusiast
Yet another reason I won't buy Apple. These people are ridiculous. I like their phones, but this is just stupid.
 

trparky

TS Evangelist
To be honest, HP, Dell, Lenovo, and a number of other computer manufacturers require you to be certified to work on their notebook computers and have required it for quite some time. Without that certification any repairs aren't backed by their warranties.

I know places like Microcenter have notebook repairs but only for devices that they have technicians that are certified to work on. HP notebooks however have to go to HP to be repaired since they don't have certified techs.
 

Cycloid Torus

Stone age computing - click on the rock below..
Gee whiz, and I thought it was because Apple considers its product only slightly safer than a landmine.
 

texasrattler

TS Evangelist
As trparky has said other manufacturers have similar repair rules. Computer manufacturers hide the battery and memory under the bottom with like 8-12 screws. They don't want anyone but themselves doing repairs. Some of them wont even touch the computer if the screws or any tampering has been done.
You can easily void warranties when doing diy repairs.

Some places like Microcenter, Best Buy, Frys and a few others have ppl that can work on computers. You don't always have to have a store warranty either. I know places like Best Buy you can bring your product in under the manufacturer warranty and have certain things taken care of. Remember though, it's under the manufacturer rules not the stores, so some things will not be covered. Also realize if you utilize the manufacturer warranty it may have to be sent in for repair, so prepare for a waiting game. Just remember this has nothing to do with the store. Stores just follow the manufacturer rules, now a store can help with a exchange but most of the time they wont cause your actually outside of their return policy. Some places are better than others though.
 
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trparky

TS Evangelist
Like it or not, Apple isn't the only ones that don't like DIY repairs; many others require certified technicians for repairs and any unauthorized repairs void the warranty. This is standard in the industry but because it's Apple the people bring out the pitchforks and torches for a good old fashioned Apple hate party.

Where's the hate parties for HP? Dell? Lenovo? GM? Ford? Toyota? Chrysler? Yeah... we don't see too many of those because well, they're not Apple.

My hypocrisy only goes so far.
 

axiomatic13

TS Maniac
So it's actually cost savings. (Disclaimer: I loathe Apple products.) But in Apple's defense here, the broken ones do get used again. The cost savings arise when that broken part they get back from a "tinkerer" is in much worse shape than the (pristinely? virgin? idk) broken one they get back from an Apple repairs center. The one from the Apple repair center can be "graded" and then sent to another processing plant to be first deconstructed, then they get a bath (really,) then they separate in different directions depending on their "grade" for refurbishment or recycle/trash. Basically, they are running a business, not trying to snub us engineers from others tech companies who are competent enough to do our own service work.
 

Puiu

TS Evangelist
Apple wants everyone to believe that only Apple folks have the intelligence to know how to do anything. Arrogant jerks.
No, it's just actually easier to believe. I think Apple just wants to keep the monopoly and is primarily interested in having a simple support model. There arise many problems if repairs are done outside apple stores, and they have a negative impact on customer experience (and maybe... monetary income too, as satisfaction with apple products decreases)
There are no problems that could arise for Apple if the consumer went to an unauthorised repair shop. If you are old enough to vote then you are old enough to assume responsibility for your own actions.
Who wants to know more about apple (and non-apple) third party repairs should watch this video made by Louis Rossmann
 
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Uncle Al

TS Evangelist
Apple will NEVER turn loose of any cash cow they are invested in .... and after all, they certainly are NOT the only corporation that does that ......
 

Skjetne

TS Enthusiast
Apple wants everyone to believe that only Apple folks have the intelligence to know how to do anything. Arrogant jerks.
Well, it has nothing to do with wether it's Apple or not, it's if it's the repair shop is authorized by Apple.
You will have a better experience with an authorized shop rather than the shady shop down at the corner.
 

Puiu

TS Evangelist
Apple wants everyone to believe that only Apple folks have the intelligence to know how to do anything. Arrogant jerks.
Well, it has nothing to do with wether it's Apple or not, it's if it's the repair shop is authorized by Apple.
You will have a better experience with an authorized shop rather than the shady shop down at the corner.
so... you'll pay the price of a new device to "repair" your old device? FYI you also lose your data, waste a week and they won't repair anything, they'll just replace the boards completely. apple doesn't do "repairs" as you know them. be it a 10$ fix or 100$ fix, they'll still ask you for 750$. another problem is that Apple is now also refusing to sell/offer diagnosis tools for their products and also doesn't give any public information on errors.
another thing: do you have any idea just how far "certified" apple repair shops can be from most people? some people who live in other countries have to take airplanes to reach one.
 
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