Ford says the upcoming Mustang will be "much more difficult" to tune, thanks to beefed...

Humza

Posts: 1,026   +171
Staff member
Bottom line: Ford unveiled the latest S650 Mustang last month. The seventh-generation model is all-new inside and out, according to the US automaker. And while its new sleeker looks may take some time to settle in with fans, those who like to take their Mustangs to third-party tuners won't be as enthusiastic this time around because of Ford's tougher onboard security measures.

The Ford Mustang is known to be one of the most tuner-friendly cars around. However, the upcoming S650 seventh-gen model could change that reputation, and not in a good way. Speaking to Ford Authority, Mustang's Chief Engineer Ed Krenz noted that the latest model utilized the company's new Fully Networked Vehicle (FNV) electrical architecture, making for some good and bad news.

The good news being the convenience of getting over-the-air updates and added cybersecurity against hackers, with cars being practically connected computers on wheels these days. However, Ford's FNV will also restrict the car's tuning potential, which is likely to upset Mustang fans.

Since the car's entire "stack" will be encrypted, including the ECU, third-party tuners are going to have a tough time getting their mods to work. For instance, the car's turbocharger and/or other components could shut down if the onboard security system detects an unauthenticated actor.

Ford can expect backlash from die-hard Mustang customers and aftermarket tuners, though for now, the automaker says that it is open to collaborating with tuners in offering "performance enhancements or tunes" for the all-new 2.3 liter EcoBoost and 5.0 liter Coyote V8 engines. What that means for 2024 Mustang owners in terms of modability remains to be seen.

Once a charismatic analog muscle car, the latest Ford Mustang seems to be undergoing a major transformation towards becoming a modern, computer on wheels. The S650 series features a fully digital cockpit running the Unreal engine-powered Sync 4 system, advanced driver assistance tech, Alexa integration, and the ability to rev the engine via the key fob remotely.

While all this tech (and the occasional gimmick) does have its appeal, it ultimately requires carmakers to bake in more security measures to prevent hacking, which in turn locks down their tuning potential that ends up annoying petrolheads.

Here's hoping Ford can find the right balance with the upcoming S650 Mustang that doesn't alienate the muscle car's core audience, while also maintaining its appeal with the younger, more techy crowd.

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Bullwinkle M

Posts: 858   +772
"While all this tech (and the occasional gimmick) does have its appeal, it ultimately requires carmakers to bake in more security measures to prevent hacking, which in turn locks down their tuning potential that ends up annoying petrolheads."
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Very confusing statement there

Did you mean that this tech has an appeal for automakers?
It certainly doesn't seem to appeal to end users

You call the tech "a security measure" to prevent hacking (or DRM), and I call it malware
Can you show "ANY EVIDENCE" that I am wrong and that you are right?

Relabeling malware and calling it DRM is a tactic used by criminals across the Globe
It is how Monopolies are made and extortion becomes legal in "their" minds

My contention is that it is not legal
You are simply trying to prevent the removal of extortionary malware
Extortionary malware is illegal and it's removal is not illegal
You may claim in Court that your DRM is protected from removal by a third party under Law, but only if does not contain an illegal component such as extortionary malware

Remove your malware or I will
DRM "may" be legal, but extortion is not
SUE ME!
 
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p51d007

Posts: 3,434   +3,112
It's MY vehicle. I PAY for it. I should be able to do WHATEVER I want to it.
I've owned 5 Mustangs. 85,89,95,99,2011. I can do WHATEVER I want to
them, as I see fit.
Ford doing this is going to have a two fold outcome.
"Gearheads" will look elsewhere, and hackers will do whatever it takes to hack
it, just to prove Ford wrong.
My dad sold Ford vehicles for over 33 years. Back when Ford was run by AUTO
guys. Not these pony tail wearing suits that the only time they are in one of the vehicles
they produce, is for the cameras. Otherwise, they ride around in a limo!
 

scavengerspc

Posts: 2,914   +3,225
TechSpot Elite
It's MY vehicle. I PAY for it. I should be able to do WHATEVER I want to it.
I've owned 5 Mustangs. 85,89,95,99,2011. I can do WHATEVER I want to
them, as I see fit.
Tell that to the state you live in about the emissions controls. :(
Bumpers, lights, odometer etc.
. Otherwise, they ride around in a limo!
They definitely do not! They ride in a Town Car stretch. :D
Like this one, I hope.

20200630-Lincoln-Town-Car-Limo-Hero-2.jpg
 
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Theinsanegamer

Posts: 3,959   +7,014
Yeah, sure. Chevy said the same thing back in 2014, and every few years more model years get cracked. It takes a bit, but nothing is immune.

The more complicated these systems get, the more potential vulnerabilities exist. Even apple cannot fully stop jailbreaking, you really think ford can do it?

This will just drive tuners back to the Corvette, charger, challenger, Camaro, and japanese and Korean turbo cars instead. Oh, and the Germans.
 

Mr Majestyk

Posts: 1,573   +1,483
Fraud has lost me as a customer if this persists. Also the only third party tuners they are allowing to do tuning are those installing superchargers. I have no intention of supercharging this car. The 390kW+ Dark Horse is more than enough for my taste. All I would want to do is some further tweaking such as all new titanium exhaust, airflow mods etc. If I could get 420kW I'm more than happy.
 

BuckarooBonzaii

Posts: 190   +135
Sounds more like a way to tone down the Mustang for street use. Don't be surprised if other companies start doing this because they're told to do so.
 
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passwordistaco

Posts: 454   +1,027
Sounds more like a way to tone down the Mustang for street use. Don't be surprised if other companies start doing this because they're told to do so.
The car is already sold for street use.
Tell that to the state you live in about the emissions controls. :(
Intake, intercooler, turbos, downpipes, and exhaust can all be upgraded, and a tune applied to maintain emissions.
 

Ravey

Posts: 383   +177
"..and the ability to rev the engine via the key fob remotely."

Tells you everything you need to know about the man-boy target demographic.

That sounds more like a feature designed to warm up the engine before you get in the car, it reduces the risk of long term damage.

 

Skjorn

Posts: 740   +609
That sounds more like a feature designed to warm up the engine before you get in the car, it reduces the risk of long term damage.
That's what idling is for. Remote revving is nothing more than look at me feature. Idk how cold revving your engine would prevent long term damage anyways, if anything sounds like would cause damage in the short term from cold revving.
 

bviktor

Posts: 1,164   +1,701
And it's illegal. Ford needs to brace itself for lawsuits.
Naturally, there's nothing illegal about encrypting your own products internals. NV does the same with their GPUs VBIOS. You buy the car, not the ability to mess around with its systems. If anything, the latter is illegal, as street legality relies on those very parameters and behaviors coded in there.
 

ZedRM

Posts: 1,424   +994
Naturally, there's nothing illegal about encrypting your own products internals. NV does the same with their GPUs VBIOS. You buy the car, not the ability to mess around with its systems. If anything, the latter is illegal, as street legality relies on those very parameters and behaviors coded in there.
But it is illegal, at least in the US, to deny vehicle owners the right to service and modify their own vehicle. It was a law that went into effect in the 1970's. That law specifically includes ALL equipment that comes with the vehicle from the factory as a deliberate function of the protections included in that law.
 
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Underdog

Posts: 283   +182
The death of hotrodding?
More lobbying by the big boys influencing government decisions.
Resistance is futile. Resistance is futile. Resistance is futile.