G.Skill shows off highly overclocked 7 GHz pyramid PC cooled with liquid nitrogen

Shawn Knight

Posts: 14,993   +190
Staff member
What just happened? Computex 2023 is in full swing and G.Skill has a rather unique system set up at its booth to demonstrate the capabilities of its memory. The Taiwanese hardware maker in collaboration with ElmorLabs is showcasing a custom build PC that is enclosed in a clear pyramid chassis. The system is running an Intel Core i9-13900K CPU on an Asus ROG Maximus Z790 Apex motherboard with G.Skill's own Trident Z5 RGB DDR5-8000 memory.

As Tom's Hardware highlights, the system is cooled with liquid nitrogen which allowed the team to really push the hardware. The CPU is clocked at an impressive 7 GHz and the memory is running at 10,000 MT/s (megatransfers (or million transfers) per second). That is not quite fast enough to break any records, but it is impressive nevertheless.

According to HWBot, the fastest memory frequency on record is 5600.6 MHz which was achieved by Seby9123 using the same G.Skill memory kit, motherboard, and CPU combo that is on display at G.Skill's booth. It was submitted to the site on May 19, 2023.

Liquid nitrogen is a proven tool for extreme overclockers, allowing them to push hardware well beyond what it was designed for. The catch, of course, is that the gains are only sustainable for a short period due to perils like condensation and the sheer cost of maintaining a steady supply of LN2.

The pyramid PC was not the only point of interest at G.Skill's booth. Several of the company's high-end memory kits were on display including the Trident Z5 Neo RGB and the Trident Z5 Royal Elite.

The hardware specialist also showed off its MD1 chassis, a mid-tower with enough interior space to accommodate lengthy graphics cards, a big CPU air cooler, and dual 360mm radiators. The case also supports up to E-ATX motherboards and has a tempered side glass window to show off everything inside.

Computex kicked off on May 30 and runs through June 2 in Taipei.

Image credit: Pyramid by GDM, memory and case by Tom's Hardware

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Achaios

Posts: 446   +1,221
Once upon the time overclocking had a specific common sense purpose.

One bought a cheap CPU/GPU and then overclocked them both in order to get higher performance in gaming. Savvy enthusiasts also underclocked their parts for improved efficiency. The ultimate goal was better performance efficiency and value for money than what the Big Tech companies wanted an end user to have.

Gradually overclocking became less and less popular mainly b/c Intel took steps to limit overclocking only to expensive parts with low value for money.

Then Intel begun releasing locked CPU's that came overclocked from the factory therefore killing low end CPU overclocking. These same CPUs also performed well enough in the vast majority of games and for the vast majority of enthusiasts.

A case study for the significantly lessened popularity overclocking enjoys today is the state of Overclock.net once in the heyday of 45nm & 65nm CPUs a hugely popular forum for enthusiasts.

Then we come to what's posted in the OP wherein some company sponsored professionals use parts that cost many thousands of dollars (completely out of reach of the average consumer) and exotic equipment to cause hardware to reach other-worldly performance through the use of a crutch/gimmick.

I don't understand what's the point and who might be interested in this other than the Bigh Tech companies who pay for advertisements.
 

wiyosaya

Posts: 9,190   +8,828
But can it play Crysis?

Man, is G.Skill on Drugs or what? Demonstrating the capabilities of its memory? 不不不不不不 To whom? 不不不不不不
 

Giacobbe Orsini

Posts: 11   +11
I don't understand what's the point and who might be interested in this other than the Bigh Tech companies who pay for advertisements.

The point is: MARKETING. It's 99% for marketing and exposure, and to be fair it's kinda a lot of fun for many people, in 2001 hardware manufacturers would have paid 100.000 dollars for some prime-time advertisement on cable television, I think this kind of marketing is even a good thing, great exposure, a big stunt, and some, but admittedly very little, research and science performed by the overclockers.

 

3volv3d

Posts: 579   +380
Then Intel begun releasing locked CPU's that came overclocked from the factory therefore killing low end CPU overclocking.

Isn't this what AMD always did? I heard this is why AMDs CPU's were hotter and yet slower than intels back in the day, to achieve the speeds intel could do or at least compete, they had to overclock them factory side.
 

godrilla

Posts: 1,014   +616
They just want to remind us how to void your warranty exotically.
But can it play Crysis?

Man, is G.Skill on Drugs or what? Demonstrating the capabilities of its memory? 不不不不不不 To whom? 不不不不不不
you would think that Crytek would make an appearance with crysis 4 or at least drop a teaser trailer with Huang dropping the meme mid presentation and all. What's wrong with this team?
 
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