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GM's Marketplace adds shopping features to your car's infotainment system

By midian182 ยท 5 replies
Dec 5, 2017
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  1. In-car infotainment systems are becoming ever more advanced, and with the addition of Wi-Fi and LTE functionality comes the sort of features that were once restricted to smartphones. General Motors' new service, called Marketplace, takes this to the next level, allowing drivers to make dinner reservations, order food, and reserve a parking space all from the confines of their vehicles.

    Launched today, the GM Marketplace will initially be available to owners of 2017 and 2018 GM-branded vehicles with 4G LTE and compatible infotainment systems. GM says around 4 million drivers will be able to access the feature immediately, a figure that’s expected to rise over the next year.

    The automotive giant says the service will allow Chevy, Buick, GMC, and Cadillac owners “to more safely interact with a growing number of their favorite brands in retail, fuel, hospitality, food, hotel and transportation through the in-vehicle touchscreen.”

    The promo video below shows a driver ordering and paying for his morning coffee from Dunkin’ Donuts, all ready to be picked up from the closest drive-thru—a process that will no doubt save him literally seconds of precious time. There’s also the ability to reserve a table at certain restaurants, and a “shop” section that notifies owners of deals related to their vehicles. The system utilizes IBM Watson’s machine learning features along with user data.

    Earlier this year, Jaguar and Shell launched the world’s first in-car payment system for gas stations in the UK, allowing drivers to pay for fuel from within their vehicles. Strangely, GM’s video shows its system giving directions to the nearest station and bringing up any available offers, but actually paying for the gas appears to involve using a smartphone app.

    More companies are expected to join the GM Marketplace in the future. While it may not be the most useful of systems, especially considering that smartphones can do all these functions, don’t be surprised to see other car makers adopt similar versions at some point.

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  2. Uncle Al

    Uncle Al TS Evangelist Posts: 3,265   +1,940

    I am seriously wondering how much longer it will be before laws are passed that limit or possibly remove the extensive "features" in the cars today. The distracted driving issue it getting larger rather than smaller and the auto makers are certainly far from "harmless" on this issue.
     
    Reehahs likes this.
  3. Teko03

    Teko03 TS Evangelist Posts: 402   +181

    So they're basically trying to move everything your smartphone can already do and put it in the cars infotainment system? Same distractions, only difference is you have to pay $499 to get updated information added to it.
     
    Reehahs likes this.
  4. senketsu

    senketsu TS Addict Posts: 246   +146

    I suspect this will be the way to convince us that self-driving cars are THE FUTURE.
     
  5. wiyosaya

    wiyosaya TS Evangelist Posts: 1,823   +691

    IMO, they should really be concentrating on in-car electronic security rather than gadgets that their marketing department tells them will sell cars.
     
    Reehahs likes this.
  6. Reehahs

    Reehahs TS Guru Posts: 538   +294

    We would miss those days where you could adjust heater setting with a push of a knob rather than stumbling through menus.

    The biggest problems with infotainment systems are that they are clunky, hard to update, and provide hardly any feedback. The feedback is important as it allows you to change things without taking your eyes off the road.
     
    senketsu likes this.

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