I Deleted All My Social Accounts: Three Weeks Without Social Media

CPO2U

TS Member
Probably not but it would make it more difficult, and in the time it would take to find an alternative means to do the deed, they might just cool off and change their mind.
Well, when it comes to murder, sure 😅 What I meant was, teenagers will find a way to connect, someway, somehow. It's what they do best.
 

CPO2U

TS Member
The only social site I use is FB since 2009, but I use it as a tool. I don't use it to gain "likes". I used to browse it a few minutes here and there throughout the day. The advertisements and privacy has escalated beyond control. Even scarier is that I have numerous examples of advertisements for obscure *spoken* topics that immediately show on the next FB login. Yes, they must be monitoring cell phone microphones. So, finally I uninstalled the FB app and disabled every service I could find. The obscure advertisements stopped immediately...

FB helps me keep in touch with people who participate in the unique watersport I do. It also helps me know of events and coordinate them. The other nice benefit is sometimes I'll catch a friend or family member that will be somewhere I am going. It gives me a chance to visit with someone or vice versa. I also use it to ask for advice or recommendations. Maybe read or share a few jokes. The biggest thing is I try to share the gospel, but it's a terrible platform for it. I also get to catch up on my favorite ministries with informative posts. All of this I can do in about 30 minutes after dinner a few times a week. Everything in moderation, but leads to my next point:

Now, if I can get rid of my addiction to games... :/ It does help me keep my mind sharp though. I don't play online any more. I uninstalled all but one game app, which I rarely play. Now it's just gaming on the PC at home. My game addiction keeps me from doing most chores. I'm not sure how I can break that.
Have you tried to "Praise the Games Away"? 😋 (sorry, I couldn't resist the religious humor)
 

CPO2U

TS Member
Social media is a disease and it's hooked an awful lot of people. Alcohol, drugs, cigarettes, and all other addictions combined got nothing on this monster.
It's just one more target of addictive personalities. I bet those same people (present company included, I'm no angel) didn't have social media but had access to cheap alcohol or easy gambling, they might put their efforts there. It's a human problem.
 

PEnnn

TS Addict
I tried it also and lasted for two months. Messenger itself is so essential and that forces you to keep your Facebook open. Wish it wasn't the case though. The others I don't care for.
Smart phones also have messengers / texting built into them. What makes Facebook Messenger so special and indispensable to you??
 
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mrvco

TS Enthusiast
A truly sad and pitiful commentary. Social is the digital equivalent of cigarettes. One we'll collectively look back and wonder what the F were we thinking.
 
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hahahanoobs

TS Evangelist
Took me three tries to drop the book for good. It's just dramas, memes and quotes. I would have stuck around if posts were more personal, but it's just a place full of like chasers.
 

lazer

TS Addict
I have noted that poople do not read books much, or even magazines. I was at the doctors and I noticed most people were with their phones. I traveled there by bus and noticed that most poople are engaged with their phones. In general I noted that when people have nothing to do, they are on their phones.

I am actually old enough to remember people reading paper books and actually talking one to the other on buses and in waiting rooms. But I doubt in the young folk will believe me.....
 
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CPO2U

TS Member
I have noted that poople do not read books much, or even magazines. I was at the doctors and I noticed most people were with their phones. I traveled there by bus and noticed that most poople are engaged with their phones. In general I noted that when people have nothing to do, they are on their phones.

I am actually old enough to remember people reading paper books and actually talking one to the other on buses and in waiting rooms. But I doubt in the young folk will believe me.....
I've tried gently sparking conversation with fellow transit riders, or at a coffee shop, or in line waiting for something... 9 times of ten they look at me as if I grew a third eye. So I often give up and pull out my phone too ("If you can't beat them..."). That said, I've managed to score 1 or 2 fun little conversations with a few random individuals over the years. In both cases they were closer to my age (mid-40s) or older. So your comment totally tracks.

I mentioned this story to a long-time friend (over a voice call, imagine that!)... she said, "It's the era in which we live. People don't want to be bothered" --> This is how society stagnates and even crumbles, nose in their phones, cowering in fear from one another.

I blame politics, lawyers, perverts, and fraudsters.
 

jobeard

TS Ambassador
@Julio Franco :: I had both Twitter and Facebook -- gave'm up 18 months ago. No rash, anaphylactic reaction, DTs or withdrawal symptoms yet and still drug free :)
 
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jobeard

TS Ambassador
I am actually old enough to remember people reading paper books and actually talking one to the other on buses and in waiting rooms. But I doubt in the young folk will believe me.....
I use to WALK to the library, browse the stack to find something to read -- yeah -- I remember, Frank Baum's "The Wizard of Oz".
 

CPO2U

TS Member
@Julio Franco :: I had both Twitter and Facebook -- gave'm up 18 months ago. No rash, anaphylactic reaction, DTs or withdrawal symptoms yet and still drug free :)
Well, there could be a delayed withdrawal reaction. Ask your doctor about Socialia, the long-term, once-a-week medication that helps sensible people such as yourself, come down safely from Social Media Madness. (Side-effects may include peaceful days, normal blood pressure, and a distinct lack of Being Totally Disgusted By People And The State of Society Today).




😅
 

jobeard

TS Ambassador
Well, there could be a delayed withdrawal reaction. Ask your doctor about Socialia, the long-term, once-a-week medication that helps sensible people such as yourself, come down safely from Social Media Madness. (Side-effects may include peaceful days, normal blood pressure, and a distinct lack of Being Totally Disgusted By People And The State of Society Today).
😅
ROFL; you're too new here to appreciate my comment
 

arrowflash

TS Booster
Firstly, anyone who has to access social media first thing in the morning and whenever they go to the toilet, is a serious pathological addict and needs professional help. I sensed quite a bit of rationalization and denial through the article. Like others have said, it's sad because the author seems to have come so close to actually ditching social media for good.

I also had to deal with sudden onset type 1 diabetes, in my late 20s. Been living with it for over 10 years now. I think this should have been even more reason for the author to drop social media for good, though - while genetic predisposition obviously plays an important role, stress is also a very significant factor for sudden onset type 1 diabetes on people between 20s - late 40s years old. In my case, I'm sure stress was at least partially responsible.

Also, social media is chock full of terrible advice for diabetic people and diabetics with bad habits, especially in communities for diabetics, so you won't be missing anything. Lots of diabetics who still think they can just cut off sweets, candy, soda and junk food, and are free to eat anything else as they please, for example.

As for my own social media use, never had accounts on Facebook, Instagram or most anything else. Only have a Twitter account but I don't really use it anymore. I used Twitter a lot back around 2009-2012, but Twitter was a very different place back then. It was just a tool to communicate, get in touch with new people who shared similar interests to exchange ideas and make small talk, it was a tool that empowered people like @psycros said. Nowadays it has become a political social engineering tool with a strong far left bias, not to mention a fake outrage machine and a haven for astroturfers and all sorts of scammers. I could already sense it was changing back around 2012 which was when I stopped using it.

I took the easy way out and simply never signed up on any social medial platform, ever. Can't miss what you never had :D

Still find it hilarious whenever family members ask why I'm not on FB/Whatsapp/IG/etc, especially when I've been the go-to IT guy to them for the past decade.
Smart man!
I'm in IT as well. I still get puzzled looks when asked same question and give them same answer 😁 I do have a YouTube channel though, so sometimes I tell them, "Look for me on YouTube".
I'm also in IT. In fact, most colleagues and people I know who work in IT aren't fans of social media.

We had it so much better in the days of ICQ and MSN Messenger. We need to get back to the kind of interaction that empowered rather than exploited us. Tech really topped out around 2007 - its all been downhill since.
Haha, you have seen this image haven't you?

https://I.redd.it/ify709jkcm7y.jpg

I have noted that poople do not read books much, or even magazines. I was at the doctors and I noticed most people were with their phones. I traveled there by bus and noticed that most poople are engaged with their phones. In general I noted that when people have nothing to do, they are on their phones.

I am actually old enough to remember people reading paper books and actually talking one to the other on buses and in waiting rooms. But I doubt in the young folk will believe me.....
I've tried gently sparking conversation with fellow transit riders, or at a coffee shop, or in line waiting for something... 9 times of ten they look at me as if I grew a third eye. So I often give up and pull out my phone too ("If you can't beat them..."). That said, I've managed to score 1 or 2 fun little conversations with a few random individuals over the years. In both cases they were closer to my age (mid-40s) or older. So your comment totally tracks.

I mentioned this story to a long-time friend (over a voice call, imagine that!)... she said, "It's the era in which we live. People don't want to be bothered" --> This is how society stagnates and even crumbles, nose in their phones, cowering in fear from one another.

I blame politics, lawyers, perverts, and fraudsters.
Going to play devil's advocate in this. Nowadays I don't blame people who don't like when strangers come to speak to them while commuting, in lines or waiting rooms, because I have become one of these people. Probably not all of them follow my reasoning, but I have what I think is a good reason for that.

I didn't use to be like that, but I realized that most strangers who come to speak to me don't really want to have a conversation, as in a mutual exchange - they only want to speak, and you better shut up and just listen and occasionally nod. Most of them don't even have the courtesy of _trying_ to hide their lack of interest, attention and disregard when it was my turn to speak, even though I always paid attention and had consideration for what they said when I listened and responded, even if they only babbled unintelligent nonsense or subjects I don't have the slightest interest into.

These people are just looking for an *****'s ear to listen to their mindless drivel, they don't want to have a conversation. And I refused to entertain them anymore, they can tip me a few dollars to do so if they really want.

In my experience, that's how it is in large metropolitan areas, at least - it's different now that I'm living in a small town, here when strangers approach you to talk they usually want to have a real conversation.
 
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CPO2U

TS Member
Firstly, anyone who has to access social media first thing in the morning and whenever they go to the toilet, is a serious pathological addict and needs professional help. I sensed quite a bit of rationalization and denial through the article. Like others have said, it's sad because the author seems to have come so close to actually ditching social media for good.

I also had to deal with sudden onset type 1 diabetes, in my late 20s. Been living with it for over 10 years now. I think this should have been even more reason for the author to drop social media for good, though - while genetic predisposition obviously plays an important role, stress is also a very significant factor for sudden onset type 1 diabetes on people between 20s - late 40s years old. In my case, I'm sure stress was at least partially responsible.

Also, social media is chock full of terrible advice for diabetic people and diabetics with bad habits, especially in communities for diabetics, so you won't be missing anything. Lots of diabetics who still think they can just cut off sweets, candy, soda and junk food, and are free to eat anything else as they please, for example.

As for my own social media use, never had accounts on Facebook, Instagram or most anything else. Only have a Twitter account but I don't really use it anymore. I used Twitter a lot back around 2009-2012, but Twitter was a very different place back then. It was just a tool to communicate, get in touch with new people who shared similar interests to exchange ideas and make small talk, it was a tool that empowered people like @psycros said. Nowadays it has become a political social engineering tool with a strong far left bias, not to mention a fake outrage machine and a haven for astroturfers and all sorts of scammers. I could already sense it was changing back around 2012 which was when I stopped using it.





I'm also in IT. In fact, most colleagues and people I know who work in IT aren't fans of social media.



Haha, you have seen this image haven't you?

https://I.redd.it/ify709jkcm7y.jpg





Going to play devil's advocate in this. Nowadays I don't blame people who don't like when strangers come to speak to them while commuting, in lines or waiting rooms, because I have become one of these people. Probably not all of them follow my reasoning, but I have what I think is a good reason for that.

I didn't use to be like that, but I realized that most strangers who come to speak to me don't really want to have a conversation, as in a mutual exchange - they only want to speak, and you better shut up and just listen and occasionally nod. Most of them don't even have the courtesy of _trying_ to hide their lack of interest, attention and disregard when it was my turn to speak, even though I always paid attention and had consideration for what they said when I listened and responded, even if they only babbled unintelligent nonsense or subjects I don't have the slightest interest into.

These people are just looking for an *****'s ear to listen to their mindless drivel, they don't want to have a conversation. And I refused to entertain them anymore, they can tip me a few dollars to do so if they really want.

In my experience, that's how it is in large metropolitan areas, at least - it's different now that I'm living in a small town, here when strangers approach you to talk they usually want to have a real conversation.
I know exactly what you mean, as this has also happened to me (a stranger just babbling at me instead of having an actual conversation). I just politely excuse myself and bail out of the situation (also physically, if possible). However that hasn't stopped me from trying for "real" interactions occasionally. I always try and "read" the other person to make sure it's a 2-way conversation and I'm not actually bothering them. It doesn't always work, but 9 times outta 10 they realize what I am doing and soften a little.

Yes... I'm that masochist "whacko" dude who visits NYC a few times a year and smiles at people for no damn reason (LOL!). I mean, it's hard enough being a negro in this world, having to apologize for (or justify) my existence while doing normal everyday human sh**, you know? I refused to go to the grave living in fear 100% of the time. Maybe I've not been hurt/mugged/insulted/assaulted enough to stop being [mostly] friendly to strangers, perhaps someday if something happens then I'll stop trying to spread Good Cheer and "Standard Mammalian Casual Social Interaction" 😁
 
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Gareeth

TS Rookie
Going against the trend and saying social media can have utility that's hard to replicate.

With family in 3 countries even if you stayed in touch by email it seemed like habits from when it was all by letter followed through. You heard the big things and none of the content that made you feel you actually knew about the smaller bits that make up the bigger part of the lived lives of loved ones.

It was a cousin who got me onto Facebook and a wave of our family mostly followed. A wave so extreme tagging a photo is a pain .

It hasn't been over time the finding out the little things which seemed to be missing but the ability to support each other through life's grittier times . Death, illness that will result in death and grief.

We've gotten more honest and more open then we were raised to be as far as the tough times went. That the utility of it being sunshine and noodle salad was probably there when the time for a letter to get to someone and a reply stretched to a month and long distance was a powerful disincentive for more than the calls that someone had died. Often you didn't know how sick they were in that era.

It's not less painful when you do know but between your ability to be supported and give support it's a form of being with people who you have no hope of spending time in the same space with. Of seeing how they are getting through things really precisely. On a weekend when death was lurking for a fairly young family member use of watch party to experience some of the music they had adored and 2 performers as well helped turning into a hours of being together in what music we heard.

Granted the kind of problem use of social media described where it's something checked on awaking something missed as you move your bowel isn't present in me.

The writer describes things which should concern anyone who reaches for anything on waking and other things but social media is like other things you can use it in ways which enhance your life and it probably helps to establish you can stay away or you can use it in ways which use up time with one of the only useful missed things before illness being replying to events.

One of the more aggravating features in my life as a handful of my friends are interested in everything and go to nothing but hey...

My position isn't that those who don't use social media should but that it's positive qualities might not occur to people who aren't thinking about families that circle the globe.

Twitter having given people the chance to keep signal boosting Iran on internet lockdown and dong so suggests a real positive as once a regime could do as it pleased largely without it being known. This is far more difficult now and the real sense of some small utility in retweeting existed.

Social media as a default running mode when bored or using the bathroom sells it short.

Due to being the nerdiest member of m family it's taken years to get them to understand when on vacation at a lake it doesn't bother me to leave the internet and technology largely behind. I get teased as the family nerd about withdrawal but it's not me asking to go in search of mobile bars.

A recurring social media break might work better than having to feel a terrifying medical experience bringing the experiment to a close is a bad thing. Whether that's x number of days a week , a week of every month or a month of every year to combat what sounds like addiction regular breaks may work better .

Possibly some people gain more from saying farewell in a permanent way but there is nothing to be ashamed of of using it in moderation - especially for things where a better means does not exist.
 
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