I Deleted All My Social Accounts: Three Weeks Without Social Media

Julio Franco

TechSpot Editor
Staff member
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Theinsanegamer

TS Evangelist
This is sad to read. You came so close, SO close to ditching social media, only to turn back to your old fix when life got tough. I'm sorry, but if your mental state is so fragile that you need social media to prop you up, you need to be in intensive pschotherapy. You went back to your old crutch thinking "the pros outweigh the cons" spoken like a true junkie, just a digital junkie.

but the psychological effect of knowing my life had changed so much was difficult to deal with, so I returned to social media. I used Facebook to warn people not to ignore the signs of any potential illnesses—as I did—and it led to an outpouring of messages and support from friends and family who I haven’t seen in an age.
This, right here, proves my point. You recieved an outpouring of support from people you havent seen in yonks. That isnt the kind of support you need. Saying "get better soon" on a facebook post requires 0 effort or feeling; just a cheap thrill of dopamean. The support of family members and close friends, talking to them in person, is far more rewarding and helpful then droning facebook accounts. I went though this, complete with a 4 day coma, at the age of 7. It sucks. but you will survive it, as millions of us do every day, and in that moment you needed to seek professional help. Instead you turned back to your drug of choice, falling into the same trap and excuses you already had. Type 1 diabetes sucks, especially developing it at such an old age (the vast majority of cases occur under the age of 18, I cant imagine adjusting for it in my mid 30s) but going back to social media looking for support isnt the answer. The groups on social media for support have the same issues, things like echo chambers and narcasistic tugging, that the rest of social media has, and there are some dangerous ideas that propegate through those "support" groups.

You fell off the horse, time to get back on and try again. Ditch social media, it isnt worth it. You say you didnt feel happier, but it takes years to undo the damage of addiction, not mere weeks. I ditched social media 3 years ago and only started to really feel the effects two years later. It's an invisible change, onle you dont realise until you take a LONG break, only to look back at social media now with a longing, or a curiosity, but a disgust for the cesspit it truly is, looking from the outside in.
 
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Uncle Al

TS Evangelist
I have some married friends that require their kids and themselves to go without social media for 30 days each year. The first year they struggled and caught each other cheating several times, the second year they were able to make it through. By the 3rd year they actually looked forward to it and their youngest daughter decided NOT to go back (apparently she was being bullied on social media) and is leading a much more productive and happy life now.

While it will never happen, I would recommend that, by law, nobody could have a social media account until they come of legal age to drink, own a gun, go into the service, etc. Not sure how much it might change things but I think just the elimination of social media bullying would be reason enough. Yeah, I know it will never happen, but think how much differently the world would be if it did.
 

amstech

IT Overlord
Social Media is like alcohol.
A little in moderation is fine, too much is not good.
Far as the author, that's terrible news and I am sorry to hear that, you've been a good reporter for Techspot. Todays science and technology has made it so folks can comfortably live with your condition and I hope it continues to improve.
 

CPO2U

TS Member
I have some married friends that require their kids and themselves to go without social media for 30 days each year. The first year they struggled and caught each other cheating several times, the second year they were able to make it through. By the 3rd year they actually looked forward to it and their youngest daughter decided NOT to go back (apparently she was being bullied on social media) and is leading a much more productive and happy life now.

While it will never happen, I would recommend that, by law, nobody could have a social media account until they come of legal age to drink, own a gun, go into the service, etc. Not sure how much it might change things but I think just the elimination of social media bullying would be reason enough. Yeah, I know it will never happen, but think how much differently the world would be if it did.
People will find a way to bully each other. For example, do you think banning guns, knives, and sledgehammers will stop people from robbing and murdering each other?
 
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CPO2U

TS Member
This is sad to read. You came so close, SO close to ditching social media, only to turn back to your old fix when life got tough. I'm sorry, but if your mental state is so fragile that you need social media to prop you up, you need to be in intensive pschotherapy. You went back to your old crutch thinking "the pros outweigh the cons" spoken like a true junkie, just a digital junkie.



This, right here, proves my point. You recieved an outpouring of support from people you havent seen in yonks. That isnt the kind of support you need. Saying "get better soon" on a facebook post requires 0 effort or feeling; just a cheap thrill of dopamean. The support of family members and close friends, talking to them in person, is far more rewarding and helpful then droning facebook accounts. I went though this, complete with a 4 day coma, at the age of 7. It sucks. but you will survive it, as millions of us do every day, and in that moment you needed to seek professional help. Instead you turned back to your drug of choice, falling into the same trap and excuses you already had. Type 1 diabetes sucks, especially developing it at such an old age (the vast majority of cases occur under the age of 18, I cant imagine adjusting for it in my mid 30s) but going back to social media looking for support isnt the answer. The groups on social media for support have the same issues, things like echo chambers and narcasistic tugging, that the rest of social media has, and there are some dangerous ideas that propegate through those "support" groups.

You fell off the horse, time to get back on and try again. Ditch social media, it isnt worth it. You say you didnt feel happier, but it takes years to undo the damage of addiction, not mere weeks. I ditched social media 3 years ago and only started to really feel the effects two years later. It's an invisible change, onle you dont realise until you take a LONG break, only to look back at social media now with a longing, or a curiosity, but a disgust for the cesspit it truly is, looking from the outside in.
I used Facebook for about 2 years, and ditched it in 2013. It was so useless and toxic to my life. I opened a Twitter account, it wasn't that fulfilling, so I closed it. Years later, I opened a different account, specifically for my nerdy interests, and focused on THAT. No personal laundry-airing, no insults, no engaging with politics. 1-2 tweets a day, and I don't engage with anyone outside the "nerdy TV shows and movies" bubble. There is little or no toxicity with my new Twitter account. That's my balance.

Like you said, we should not allow Social Media to be used by under-18 folks. Then again, there are stories of families that banned social media... only to find their kids communicating via Google Docs, YouTube comment sections, and other non-social-media tools. That genie cannot be put back in the bottle, unfortunately.
 

MarkHughes

TS Addict
The only one I had was Facebook and I closed that years ago and never looked back. I quit alcohol at a similar time, 2 toxic things cleared out and my life did nothing but improve.
 

EClyde

TS Evangelist
I have a FB account and I like it. Anything is what you make it. I can keep in touch with old friends thousands of miles away and express myself. I belong to a few TV and author groups that I really enjoy.
FB is not toxic. The news is toxic. I quit seeking news over a year ago and that has been swell.
 

CPO2U

TS Member
I have a FB account and I like it. Anything is what you make it. I can keep in touch with old friends thousands of miles away and express myself. I belong to a few TV and author groups that I really enjoy.
FB is not toxic. The news is toxic. I quit seeking news over a year ago and that has been swell.
Your reality elements (including the people around you) are clearly less toxic than mine. I wish things were different, but hey... it is what it is.
 
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herpaderp

TS Booster
I took the easy way out and simply never signed up on any social medial platform, ever. Can't miss what you never had :D

Still find it hilarious whenever family members ask why I'm not on FB/Whatsapp/IG/etc, especially when I've been the go-to IT guy to them for the past decade.
 

CPO2U

TS Member
I took the easy way out and simply never signed up on any social medial platform, ever. Can't miss what you never had :D

Still find it hilarious whenever family members ask why I'm not on FB/Whatsapp/IG/etc, especially when I've been the go-to IT guy to them for the past decade.
Smart man!
I'm in IT as well. I still get puzzled looks when asked same question and give them same answer 😁 I do have a YouTube channel though, so sometimes I tell them, "Look for me on YouTube".
 

Underdog

TS Addict
People will find a way to bully each other. For example, do you think banning guns, knives, and sledgehammers will stop people from robbing and murdering each other?
Probably not but it would make it more difficult, and in the time it would take to find an alternative means to do the deed, they might just cool off and change their mind.
 

ShagnWagn

TS Evangelist
The only social site I use is FB since 2009, but I use it as a tool. I don't use it to gain "likes". I used to browse it a few minutes here and there throughout the day. The advertisements and privacy has escalated beyond control. Even scarier is that I have numerous examples of advertisements for obscure *spoken* topics that immediately show on the next FB login. Yes, they must be monitoring cell phone microphones. So, finally I uninstalled the FB app and disabled every service I could find. The obscure advertisements stopped immediately...

FB helps me keep in touch with people who participate in the unique watersport I do. It also helps me know of events and coordinate them. The other nice benefit is sometimes I'll catch a friend or family member that will be somewhere I am going. It gives me a chance to visit with someone or vice versa. I also use it to ask for advice or recommendations. Maybe read or share a few jokes. The biggest thing is I try to share the gospel, but it's a terrible platform for it. I also get to catch up on my favorite ministries with informative posts. All of this I can do in about 30 minutes after dinner a few times a week. Everything in moderation, but leads to my next point:

Now, if I can get rid of my addiction to games... :/ It does help me keep my mind sharp though. I don't play online any more. I uninstalled all but one game app, which I rarely play. Now it's just gaming on the PC at home. My game addiction keeps me from doing most chores. I'm not sure how I can break that.
 

Reallyhow

TS Enthusiast
Ah, an excellent issue of "How I learned how to stop worrying and be pretentious: A film by and for Octogenarians"

It's the hit follow up to the boomer classic "Cellphone bad!"
 

psycros

TS Evangelist
We had it so much better in the days of ICQ and MSN Messenger. We need to get back to the kind of interaction that empowered rather than exploited us. Tech really topped out around 2007 - its all been downhill since.
 

Bullwinkle M

TS Addict
Could I survive?

I never had a Facebook account, Instaspam, twitter or any other social media account, so....umm....

Yeah I think I could survive without them

Never owned a smartphone either
Am I missing anything important?

I also never owned any "Internet of crap" devices except for a smart TV that has never been connected to the Internet

My puters dont have webcams or mic's either (never did)

To me, security is more important than the next latest and greatest piece of malware
 
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JimboJoneson

TS Member
Here's a thought ... how much of social addiction is enabled by having access by phone? How much does the phone play in the addiction itself ... is social media as addictive without a phone? Is the phone an enabler of addictions?

I have a Facebook account, but I don't have a phone. I only access it from my PC maybe once a day at the very most, sometimes I go a week without even logging in. since I don't get stupid notifications from all the narcissists that want me to know where they had lunch or the ever increasingly stupid political and other memes, in real time, I could care less ...

Not having a phone keeps my relationship with Facebook sane in an obvious world of "insane phone zombies".

 

Tonia73986

TS Member
I'll admit I'm addicted. I'm also retired USAF. Facebook makes it easier to keep in touch with each other; keeping contact with family, and with all your friends all over the WORLD. Maybe it's just me, but the military taught me how to be respectful to my fellow humans, and you will never find me arbitrarily insulting others, like what's happening now on social media. Also, we were trained to DEAL with each other...we may be different, but we're all family; brothers and sisters in arms. Somehow along the way, the American people, or society in general, lost that general respect for one another. Until you prove you're an *******, you won't be called one, or treated like one, I should say. My first experience with Facebook was when I was introduced to it while on temporary duty to Saudi Arabia. It was, and is very useful for military. Making a personal telephone call from where I was was out of the question.
 
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Boshum

TS Enthusiast
Hey, I am sorry to hear about your bad health news. I've been reading/watching interesting stuff about diet/intermittent fasting/gut health/dangers of sugar/etc...and the possible vast improvements it can make with diabetes/allergies/diseases/health etc. I get the impression that the normal medical community only has the most rudimentary understanding of the role of diet in health outcomes and is more geared to treating symptoms.
It might be well worth your time to do some thorough research about diet and fasting, while also playing devil's advocate with what you are learning and compile some useful steps that you feel comfortable taking for the sake of your health. I will pray for your best.
 
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