Intel Core i9-10900K, Core i7-10700K and Core i5-10600K marketing slides surface online

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<p><img height="1019" src="https://static.techspot.com/images2/news/bigimage/2020/04/2020-04-04-image-3.jpg" width="1400"></p>

<p>This past week Intel unveiled the 10th generation, <a href="https://www.techspot.com/news/84660-intel-launches-10th-gen-comet-lake-h-series.html">Comet Lake H-series CPUs</a> for high-end laptops, sparking gamers and creators' enthusiasm with potent silicon that breaks the 5 GHz speed barrier inside a 45 W thermal envelope.</p>

<p>Of course, people have also been waiting for a while now to see the desktop variants in all their glory. After all, these will require new motherboards with LGA 1200 sockets, so everyone wants to know if they're worth upgrading to.</p>

<p>The new processors are reportedly slated for an April 30 announcement, and the marketing materials have already <a href="https://videocardz.com/newz/intel-core-i9-10900k-core-i7-10700k-and-core-i5-10600k-marketing-materials-leak">leaked</a> online.</p>

<p><img height="866" src="https://static.techspot.com/images2/news/bigimage/2020/04/2020-04-04-image-2.jpg" width="1200"></p>

<p>As expected, the i9-10900K seems to be a 10-core processor with a base clock of 3.7 Ghz and the ability to boost up to 5.3 Ghz using Intel's Thermal Velocity Boost (TVB) technology. This appears to be an exclusive feature of all 10th generation i9 variants. The i9-10900K is expected to have a TDP of 125W, and TVB will only kick in for short, burst workloads, and only when temperature and power budget allow for it.</p>

<p>Based on various <a href="https://www.techspot.com/news/84602-leaked-benchmark-shows-core-i9-10900k-beating-9900k.html">benchmarks</a> that have surfaced over the last few months, the i9-10900K is expected to be quite a bit faster than an i9-9900K (up to 30% in some scenarios). Leaks hint that it could be faster than AMD's Ryzen 3700X but also a tad <a href="https://twitter.com/TUM_APISAK/status/1243352665544888320">slower</a> than an R9 3900X.</p>

<p>Power efficiency won't be a strong point for the i9-10900K (which remains a 14nm part), which means Intel will have to play with pricing to get a winning formula against losing more <a href="https://www.techspot.com/news/82674-amd-continues-erode-intel-cpu-market-share.html">market share</a> to AMD. The latter is expected to unveil its <a href="https://www.techspot.com/news/83615-amd-lisa-su-doubles-down-big-navi-zen.html">Zen 3</a> CPU lineup in the second half of this year, and those will be improvements on 7nm, Zen 2 CPUs, which are already <a href="https://www.techspot.com/bestof/cpu/">proving</a> to be a better deal.</p>

<p><img height="847" src="https://static.techspot.com/images2/news/bigimage/2020/04/2020-04-04-image-4.jpg" width="1200"></p>

<p>The i7-10700K will be an 8-core CPU with a base frequency of 3.8 GHz that will only go up to 5.1 GHz, but it won't support Thermal Velocity Boost. Contrast that with mobile Comet Lake i7 parts which do get support for TVB, and you'd think that Intel forgot to add that in for the desktop part. However, even on high-end laptops that will feature the best possible cooling solution, the desktop i7-10700K with the standard, Turbo Boost 3.0 will likely be able to sustain all-core boost clocks for much longer than say, the i7-10875H with TVB.</p>

<p><img height="810" src="https://static.techspot.com/images2/news/bigimage/2020/04/2020-04-04-image-5.jpg" width="1200"></p>

<p>The i5-10600K will be a 6-core CPU with a moderately higher base clock of 4.1 GHz and a maximum boost clock of 4.8 Ghz. All three Comet Lake-S unlocked CPUs will come in two versions, one with a recycled Intel UHD 620 iGPU (rebranded to UHD 630 and running at slightly higher clocks), and a KF series without an iGPU.</p>

<p>At this point, pricing is everyone's guess, and so is Intel's ability to deliver these parts as originally planned, considering the <a href="https://www.techspot.com/news/84064-opinion-apple-coronavirus-warnings-highlight-complexities-tech-supply.html">impact</a> of the coronavirus pandemic on supply chains worldwide.</p>
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Intel will deliver made by Samsung good production process. Samsung have 5nm node working and intel s new architecture will be manufactured on that in couple years . Gem 10 looks very good to me .it is a case of squeezing more out of skylake architecture but is showing just how good that architecture is . I doubt zen will prove as good in comparison in years to come . Cooling won’t be a problem for water cooling loop with cpu block full coverage designs . I’m exited
 

Burty117

Posts: 3,703   +1,551
I'm not here to be rude or anything but I have an 8700k paired with decent RAM and a 1080Ti, all underwater and I've experimented quite a lot with overclocks and I don't understand everyone's obsession with 5GHz?

I lowered my overclock to 4.8 (all core) as anything above I just wasn't really seeing any better performance except in a couple of benchmarks but in return way higher power draw and heat output.

Is there a reason everyone is getting a hard on for 5GHz? I could understand it if it was a node shrink and/or new architecture but it's not, it's the same thing Intel has been spitting out for years now.
 
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Shadowboxer

Posts: 570   +333
Wouldn’t it be great if these parts come in faster and cheaper than the AMD hardware out now. It would be good competition and the consumers would benefit most.

In fact you would have to be a pretty savage AMD fanboy to not want Intel to outdo AMD..
 

Lounds

Posts: 409   +302
Wouldn’t it be great if these parts come in faster and cheaper than the AMD hardware out now. It would be good competition and the consumers would benefit most.

In fact you would have to be a pretty savage AMD fanboy to not want Intel to outdo AMD..
Intel doesn't serve consumers and it's customers, it serves it's shareholders and it's main focus is holding a high share price. AMD has plenty of room to grow, intel does no, so intel will be focused on profit margins.
 

Shadowboxer

Posts: 570   +333
Intel doesn't serve consumers and it's customers, it serves it's shareholders and it's main focus is holding a high share price. AMD has plenty of room to grow, intel does no, so intel will be focused on profit margins.
Intel and AMD are both exactly the same, they are both massive American corporations (who both pay very little tax, AMD far less than Intel). Of course they both put shareholders first.

What worries me is that there are people out there who genuinely believe AMD cares about them. They don’t, that’s just the marketing. They only care about your money. At least most people get it with Intel!