LG shows off the world's first rollable TV, will go on sale later this year

William Gayde

TS Addict
Staff member

TVs that roll up into their base when not in use have been teased at CES for a few years now, but it's finally time for one to hit the market.

LG announced the product a while back and it is now on display for everyone to admire at CES this year. The 65" 4K TV, called the LG Signature OLED TV R, will go on sale in the Spring for an as yet undisclosed price. Given the R&D required to bring this to market, we expect it to be in the 5-figures.

The backing of the TV has numerous slats which allow it to roll around an internal cylinder with the whole process taking around 10 seconds. Since this is the first of its type, it's hard to tell how robust this window blind-style mechanism is. LG has tested it for 50,000 cycles though, which should outlast the TV meaning it won't be an issue.

Image credit: The Verge

Since the main selling point of this model is that it disappears when you don't want to see it, you may expect it to sacrifice on image quality. LG claims it provides the same image quality as their other non-rollable OLED models. Until we can get a direct comparison though, we'll just have to take their word for it.

The base of the unit is where all the connectivity is stored. LG has moved to HDMI 2.1 and also included support for Amazon Alexa, Apple AirPlay 2, and Google Assistant. There is also 100W speaker in the base, but if you're spending this much on a TV, you'll certainly want some dedicated speakers.

Lead Image Credit: Todd Haselton, CNBC

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toooooot

TS Evangelist
I dont doubt its ability to roll, but whats gonna happen to the elasticity of the materials in 4 years? I wouldn't wanna keep it for a shorter period. I think I d rather get normal Oled over this.
 

wiyosaya

TS Evangelist
I dont doubt its ability to roll, but whats gonna happen to the elasticity of the materials in 4 years? I wouldn't wanna keep it for a shorter period. I think I d rather get normal Oled over this.
From what I read, it sounds like the OLED materials are on distinct strips - which can be seen in the video. It does not sound like a continuous roll of some flexible material that might die of fatigue problems. If the 50,000 cycle lifetime is real, that should be well more than enough cycles so that the rolling mechanism and the display will outlast the useful life of the TV.
 

p51d007

TS Evangelist
At the price, new tech is always expensive. So this "bleeding edge" technology will be
in the "upper class" homes to show off to others, also those that are tech crazy, to show
their friends, and those that can't afford it.
Look how expensive LCD's, the LED's where, and now look at the price.
 

captaincranky

TechSpot Addict
I desperately need one of these TVs, so I can pay 5 times, (at least ?), what my current TV cost, so that I can roll the damned thing down, and see the blank white wall behind it.
 
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netman

TS Evangelist
It would be cool if this thing can be wall or ceiling mounted to give you back your floor real estate....
 

toooooot

TS Evangelist
One thing is clear here, everyone who has read this news would gladly buy this TV if it was in his comfortable price range. We come here for tech news and gadgets. People who wouldn't be interested in this stuff are not techspot regulars.
 

cliffordcooley

TS Redneck
Hmm I must not be a regular.

Actually I would like to have a roll-up TV screen, but not one this large. I would like to modify an old stereo cabinet to include a hidden TV. A 60 inch screen would be more to the size I need.
 

captaincranky

TechSpot Addict
Hmm I must not be a regular..[ ]....
Me either..:confused:

I think I'd have to paint a picture of a TV on the wall behind the TV though, so the room wouldn't seem empty while the TV was rolled up (y) (Y)

Pepsi has released a TV commercial based on the Chicago Bear's last minute missed field goal yesterday versus the Eagles. Sure it's way off topic, but funny as hell

 
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Squid Surprise

TS Evangelist
I just don't see the value of this tech any more.... decades ago, when huge TVs were rare (and "huge" meant 30", not 65"+), and they were CRTs (therefore quite deep) hiding the TV when not in use made some sense... perhaps...

But nowadays, a flat screen is kind of expected in virtually any homeowner's home. It's not "gauche" to have a large screen in your living room - in fact, it's pretty much a bragging point for many (size matters!).

Rolling it away almost seems counter-intuitive - how can I brag about my huge 65" 4K TV if no one can see it?!!?

This makes sense only for those who have limited wall space... but if you can afford more than 10k on a TV, you almost certainly have plenty of space....

If you want a large roll-away screen, it seems far smarter to buy a really nice projector (which is still going to be far cheaper than this TV) and a regular screen...
 

captaincranky

TechSpot Addict
The promotional photo at the top of the page, is probably the most asinine arrangement they could come up with

Ideally, there should be a black wall behind the screen in a true home theater system.

To put a TV in front of a bright blue sky, with its ridiculously high ambient light level pouring through that panoramic window is, well, plain old stupid. There's simply no other way to describe it.

I get what they're trying to do, which is to say, "wow, look at at skyline after the TV screen is retracted. But I would be very surprised if the didn't have to burn in that background with Photoshop, to show any detail in the outdoor part of the scene, while making the TV appear at normal brightness..
 

cliffordcooley

TS Redneck
This makes sense only for those who have limited wall space... but if you can afford more than 10k on a TV, you almost certainly have plenty of space....
In the video the wall behind has a view. But like cranky suggest many homes would be let with a blank white wall. So unless there is a view behind the TV, I fail to see the point in one. Especially if it is used often.
 

wiyosaya

TS Evangelist
In the video the wall behind has a view. But like cranky suggest many homes would be let with a blank white wall. So unless there is a view behind the TV, I fail to see the point in one. Especially if it is used often.
Well, one could always hang a painting on the wall behind it. :D
 

captaincranky

TechSpot Addict
In the video the wall behind has a view. But like cranky suggest many homes would be let with a blank white wall. So unless there is a view behind the TV, I fail to see the point in one. Especially if it is used often.
Actually, the view behind the TV is promotional shtick. To avail yourself of the TV's full potential, you'd need to hang black velvet drapes behind the TV, and close them while you were viewing it.. Please read my post #17..

Imagine yourselves sitting in a movie theater at high noon, with floor to ceiling glass windows.
 
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