Linksys announces a home security service that uses Wi-Fi to detect intruders

Cal Jeffrey

TS Evangelist
Staff member

On Tuesday, Linksys introduced a new service called Linksys Aware to monitor your home for intruders. Using data from Velop mesh routers, the system can monitor and detect invasions in the house through WiFi.

The Linksys Velop Tri-Band AC2200 routers can detect motion within its "Intelligent MeshTM" network, eliminating the need for cameras or mounted motion detectors. When the system senses movement, it will send an alert to the Linksys Smart WiFi app on the user's iPhone or Android smartphone.

"Motion sensing in Mesh WiFi has incredible potential to change the way the general public taps into the capabilities of their routers," said Linksys Aware Product Manager Matthew Keasler. "No longer will the router just be a device that enables Internet access in a home, it will be the cog that drives the smart home. Since Linksys is first-to-market, we anticipate playing a large role in that revolution."

Users do not have to worry about being spammed with motion alerts since they can enable, disable, and snooze detection from the app at any time. It also has sensitivity settings so that the cat is not waking you up every five minutes in the middle of the night.

The app also keeps a running history of activity for up to 60 days for review. Logs are viewable by the hour, day, and week.

Linksys Aware is not a free service, though. It is a subscription program that will run you $2.99 per month or $24.99 per year. However, even factoring in the expensive Velop routers' cost, it's a pretty reasonable price when compared to the cost of basic motion detection systems like SimpliSafe.

Linksys is offering a 90-day free trial of the service. All you have to do is update your router's firmware then download and install the app from either Apple or Google stores.

Also, those that do not have a Velop mesh router are not entirely out of the loop. Linksys said that it would eventually phase other Linksys mesh routers into the program. It did not have a timeline available, so those interested might have to wait a bit.

Image credit charnsitr via Shutterstock

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VitalyT

Russ-Puss
The problem where I live, the police cares nothing for burglars. I know a guy who perfectly video-recorded faces of the people who robbed his house, gave it to the police and still got no reaction whatsoever. The police knew them, they just couldn't be bothered to do anything about it.

 

Uncle Al

TS Evangelist
Yeah, your town is no exception. We have the same problem here with lazy police. When there is a burglary the first question they ask is "you have insurance, don't you?" And they they look around a little and leave, posting a near worthless police report the next week. I filed two complaints with our State Police and the state court and was basically told, we can't do anything ... it's between you and your local police. And yet they have the nerve each year to come door to door seeking donations for "better policing" ....
 

ShagnWagn

TS Guru
Great, yet another device on the market to spy on us (and we have to pay for it?). Ya don't think authorities can gather this data at any time, hmm? Nah, we can trust them... plus all the hackers that get to the data.
 
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Jimster480

TS Booster
The problem where I live, the police cares nothing for burglars. I know a guy who perfectly video-recorded faces of the people who robbed his house, gave it to the police and still got no reaction whatsoever. The police knew them, they just couldn't be bothered to do anything about it.
This is basically Miami as well. There were multiple robberies in my area and nothing happened for over a year until the group was caught in the dumbest ever scenario.
Before that point in time; the police literally did nothing despite repeated robberies in the area.
 
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