Microsoft announces Windows 10 Fall Creators Update

Shawn Knight

Posts: 12,522   +122
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Microsoft on Thursday detailed the next major update on the docket for Windows 10. The Fall Creators Update, announced during the day-two keynote at its Build 2017 conference in Seattle, is a continuation of the work Microsoft delivered in the first Creators Update. It will largely focus on four key features.

Timeline is a new feature that utilizes a visual “timeline” to let you “jump back” in time to a previous activity; think of it as a time machine for resuming work on earlier sessions. This seems to work in conjunction with another new feature that lets you “pick up where you left off” working across multiple devices (including Android and iOS).

There’s also a new cloud-based “virtual” clipboard that’ll make it easy to copy and paste content spanning various platforms. It sounds a lot like Apple’s Universal Clipboard if you’re familiar with that.

The Fall Creators Update will additionally improve the functionality of OneDrive, Microsoft’s file-hosting service. Specifically, the Files On-Demand feature will allow users to grab just a handful of files without having to download or sync an entire folder.

Microsoft also provided attendees with a look at its new Fluent Design. Previously known as Project Neon, Fluent Design is described by some as Microsoft’s equivalent to Google’s Material Design standard. You can get a glimpse of what to expect from Fluent Design in the teaser clip above.

Microsoft didn’t provide an exact launch date for the Fall Creators Update although the company said recently that significant OS updates would arrive in the March and September timeframes.

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noel24

Posts: 627   +639
I knew Windows 10 will Fall but not that fast. But seriously, the name is at best unthoughtful. Anyone wanna bet that MS critics will call it "Windows 10 Fail"?
 

bazz2004

Posts: 1,638   +270
I've no aversion to progress but it is getting harder to keep up. My needs are pretty basic and most of the new features being rolled out are for the benefits of professional and business users. There's a massive learning curve for new entrants to computing. They got easier to use then things went the other way. Even something basic like setting up a wireless printer can be ridiculously taxing. I don't know how easy Macs are for users but my iPad is so easy to use and keep updated that it puts Windows to shame.
 
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Raoul Duke

@bazz2004, I feel your pain. They keep adding more and more to Win 10, but I keep using it in the same old way. Even if I was interested there will be no Win 10 manual because it will be invalidated by the next update. I don't use OneDrive, nor Office 365 (I have Office 2016) etc. I do find on an install tho that it recognizes almost anything and at least gives you a default driver so that it works before you tweak.
 
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Skidmarksdeluxe

Posts: 8,645   +3,281
@bazz2004, I feel your pain. They keep adding more and more to Win 10, but I keep using it in the same old way. Even if I was interested there will be no Win 10 manual because it will be invalidated by the next update. I don't use OneDrive, nor Office 365 (I have Office 2016) etc. I do find on an install tho that it recognizes almost anything and at least gives you a default driver so that it works before you tweak.
There's a lot of truth in the old proverb "The more things change, the more they stay the same". Windows 10 works exactly like Win 95 did. As just a regular home user these days, all these fancy new features are completely redundant to me.
 
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MoeJoe

Posts: 837   +441
@bazz2004, I feel your pain. They keep adding more and more to Win 10, but I keep using it in the same old way. Even if I was interested there will be no Win 10 manual because it will be invalidated by the next update. I don't use OneDrive, nor Office 365 (I have Office 2016) etc. I do find on an install tho that it recognizes almost anything and at least gives you a default driver so that it works before you tweak.
There's a lot of truth in the old proverb "The more things change, the more they stay the same". Windows 10 works exactly like Win 95 did. As just a regular home user these days, all these fancy new features are completely redundant to me.
Really?
"Windows 10 works exactly like Win 95 did."

LMAO
 
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Raoul Duke

Really?
"Windows 10 works exactly like Win 95 did."

LMAO
Really!
actually I'm the one LMAO because you obviously didn't 'get it'
you still look at a monitor, use a mouse and keyboard etc. There are still icons, windows, etc.
If you thought he meant all the code, memory management, storage support etc., your command/comprehension of the English language has fallen short of the requirements of the post.
 

TheBigFatClown

Posts: 811   +304
@bazz2004, I feel your pain. They keep adding more and more to Win 10, but I keep using it in the same old way. Even if I was interested there will be no Win 10 manual because it will be invalidated by the next update. I don't use OneDrive, nor Office 365 (I have Office 2016) etc. I do find on an install tho that it recognizes almost anything and at least gives you a default driver so that it works before you tweak.
There's a lot of truth in the old proverb "The more things change, the more they stay the same". Windows 10 works exactly like Win 95 did. As just a regular home user these days, all these fancy new features are completely redundant to me.
Really?
"Windows 10 works exactly like Win 95 did."

LMAO
I see good and bad in Windows 10. When Windows 8 was first released everybody was "hyped" and "psyched" about the new simple UI design with the pastel colors. Because it feeds everybody's "it's been 6 weeks, I want something new" fetish. I predicted at some point the simple UI would be replaced and...lo and behold...what was "old" and so "yesterday" is coming back around to the front of the line as "new and fresh". People want transparency, blur effects, animations, lots of colors, etc. Especially those on $1000+ systems. The work for pandering to the lowest common denominator is over. Hopefully, for good.

When Windows 7 was being finalized for public release the goal was an operating system and nothing but an operating system for the most part. Somewhere between finishing 7 and releasing 8 Microsoft got the idea that they should build their operating system to monetize each and every user from the cradle to the grave. That underlying philosophy which is the core purpose of Windows 8 and Windows 10 is what scares me most.

I fear Windows-as-a-service or subscription is inevitable even though it's ultimately unnecessary. I don't like the idea of being nickled-and-dimed to death.

Windows 10 is in the news so much now it's ridiculous. It's tiresome trying to keep up with it all.

I'm all for advances in technology. But going in circles...not so much.
 
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captaincranky

Posts: 16,065   +4,868
"Timeline is a new feature that utilizes a visual “timeline” to let you “jump back” in time to a previous activity; think of it as a time machine for resuming work on earlier sessions. This seems to work in conjunction with another new feature that lets you “pick up where you left off” working across multiple devices".

Adobe has been doing something along these lines in their photo editing software. (Photoshop itself, and the Photoshop Elements editors), allowing you to choose how many levels of "undo" you dial into it. It does eat memory like crazy. Not that important nowadays, but dear lord, once upon a time.
 

ghostf1re

Posts: 414   +265
I just use Windows 10 for gaming (via Steam) and some basic photo editing. Other than that, I really don't do anything special. All of these features are nice, but I don't use any of them. I don't even know anyone who does.