Microsoft is going the extra mile to make sure users don't skirt Windows 11 hardware requirements

Shawn Knight

Posts: 13,498   +132
Staff member
Why it matters: During a recent Ask Microsoft Anything session, the team confirmed that if a device is not fully compatible with Windows 11, it won’t even be offered the option to download it via Windows Update. But will the enthusiast community find a workaround?

Microsoft’s Aria Carley said they know it sucks that some systems aren’t going to be eligible for Windows 11, but they are doing it to ensure that compatible devices are more productive, have a better experience and have better security.

Microsoft laid out a very specific set of hardware requirements that’ll be needed in order to run Windows 11. Namely, you’ll need Trusted Platform Module 2.0, which you can read more about in our feature here.

Microsoft will be able to determine (in the background) if a system is capable of running Windows 11. If it isn’t, it will never even be offered the opportunity to download the install files.

Furthermore, Carley noted that modifying a group policy will not enable users to get around the hardware enforcement for Windows 11. “We’re still going to block you from upgrading your device to an unsupported state since we really want to make sure that your devices stay supported and secure,” she added.

Despite Microsoft’s best efforts, it’s entirely likely that enthusiasts will still find a workaround for Windows 11’s requirements. If it were me, I wouldn’t toss out your slightly dated hardware just yet.

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Dimitriid

Posts: 1,083   +2,054
Yeah double down on a bad choice: It went so well in the past for you with Vista and 8 I can't foresee any issues with widespread adoption by scaring a substantial chunk of the audience that, since it's tech savvy, is likely to publicly give you bad press just like it happened with those other 2 OS releases, I'm sure *this time* it will aaaall work out fiiiine.
 

m4a4

Posts: 2,535   +3,017
TechSpot Elite
I mean, if they want to offer the product for free, they can go ahead.

A workaround will be found, where MS can wash their hands of whatever happens with it.

New PC's sold will meet the standard, and only time will tell how much MS actually shot themselves in the foot for a security feature...
 

defaultluser

Posts: 249   +223
Yeah, and I will be happy to leave all four of my incompatible computers on Win 10.

This pointless early spec cutoff is just like forcing users to move to touch on Windows 8 (with that hideous start screen)
 

kimo1

Posts: 242   +439
As I read on OS customizers forum: currently there are 3 simple tricks to bypass TPM and SecureBoot checks on fresh install of w11 DEV build. w11 will install and run without any need for TPM or SB.
In latest dev build by M$ the requirement has been replaced simply with a warning.
For what the TPM and SB is, is to be seen in October, if at all.
Maybe Digital Restriction Mechanism developers will start demanding TPM presence.
 

kiwigraeme

Posts: 542   +417
I understand MS includes a lot of legacy stuff - mainly so large companies can still run their bespoke software . However saying that - any M/B CPU making the grade will probably not have old hardware on them - so could MS cut out some legacy stuff in the main package ?
I understand with PCI cards etc - you can put the old stuff back on - in that case MS could add -one of their " you need last century NET to run this device - install here" or is it last century RUN TIME ( again I'm not s Sys admin)
 

seeprime

Posts: 598   +745
0patch.com already provides micro-updates for Windows 10 v.180x. Their patching is faster than Microsoft's own update system. I use the Pro version to keep my Windows 7 workstation patched, at $30 per year. I've installed it on several customer old PC's where the customer didn't have the financial resources to upgrade, and their machine tested out fine. 0patch will still be around when Window 10 official MS support ends in October 2025. No need to worry about older PC's that MS would rather have removed from use.
 
One work around I found is if you to the initial of Windows 11 on a device that meets the requirements after the first reboot when all the files where copied you can then clone that to any computer and it still works. We have Windows 11 running on a 2014 laptop lol.
 

Tantor

Posts: 200   +370
One work around I found is if you to the initial of Windows 11 on a device that meets the requirements after the first reboot when all the files where copied you can then clone that to any computer and it still works. We have Windows 11 running on a 2014 laptop lol.

Good news. That means TPM is only required during installation, not during actual use.
 

p51d007

Posts: 2,849   +2,208
I use to build my own computers from the late 80's until around 2005. Since then, I just buy an off the shelf computer. (I stopped playing computer games). Now it's just surf, play music and photoshop is the "hardest" I put my computer through.
I'm kind of due to update. The i5 is getting long in the tooth. I'll wait til spring...by then all the MAJOR bugs hardware/software wise "should" be worked out and I'll just buy a new one pre-installed with 11.
 

Darth Shiv

Posts: 2,221   +791