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New electron microscope records 100,000 images per second

By Cal Jeffrey · 12 replies
Feb 26, 2019
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  1. A team at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) designed an electron detector that is 60-times faster than conventional electron microscopy. This breakthrough allows scientists to see and record all reactions during experiments. They call it the “4D Camera.”

    “This new tool, a superfast detector installed February 12 at Berkeley Lab’s Molecular Foundry, a nanoscale science user facility, captures more images at a faster rate, revealing atomic-scale details across much larger areas than was possible before,” said Berkeley Lab in a press release.

    The detector is capable of capturing images at 100,000 times per second. As can be imagined, this produces a ton of data — about 4TB per minute to be exact.

    “The amount of data is equivalent to watching about 60,000 HD movies simultaneously,” said Peter Ercius, a scientist with Berkeley Lab’s Molecular Foundry.

    The images are fed through 96 fiber optic cables that are about a kilometer long to Berkeley's supercomputer Cori. Cori can process the data in about 20 seconds.

    The detector can provide a much wider field of view for scientists to observe. It can also allow them to watch “movies” of a reaction rather than viewing just a snapshot. Practical applications include studying batteries or microchips to understand how they fail or to detect flaws.

    “It opens up a new time regime to explore with high-resolution microscopy. No one has ever taken continuous movies at this time resolution [using electron imaging],” said Andrew Minor, National Center for Electron Microscopy's facility director at the Molecular Foundry. “What happens there? There are all kinds of dynamics that might happen. We just don’t know because we’ve never been able to look at them before.”

    The 4D Camera will allow researchers to see every electron that passes through a sample and is scattered. In turn, this will enable them to perform “virtual experiments” on samples without having to repeatedly go back and take new measurements under different imaging conditions.

    Permalink to story.

     
  2. Squid Surprise

    Squid Surprise TS Evangelist Posts: 2,568   +1,548

    Let's see the Ghost in the Machine hide from us now!
     
    mcborge likes this.
  3. Uncle Al

    Uncle Al TS Evangelist Posts: 5,527   +3,911

    Now that is some truly impressive technical news! Back in grad school we got our hands on an EM and it was 1/4 a day just to prepare the material plus trial and error on the work. If we were able to produce a couple images in a day it was nothing short of a miracle!
     
    Cal Jeffrey likes this.
  4. Lew Zealand

    Lew Zealand TS Guru Posts: 770   +657

    Mrs. Zealand used to be able to field service a mechanical SEM. Take it entirely apart and reassemble it. Yes, and have it work properly afterwards. Soon after the newer EMs went to computer driven, which enables the tech reported here, but are not troubleshot in the same way. Skills of a bygone era.
     
  5. Bullwinkle M

    Bullwinkle M TS Booster Posts: 145   +74

    Sounds as if it were not your own money you are spending
    96 Fiber Optic Cables?
    100,000 frames per second?
    4TB per minute?
    ----------------------------------------------
    Try a variable frame rate from 30 to 100,000 frames per second with a memory buffer to avoid missing motion frames and to regulate a meta stream to vary the playback speed
    (Fast framerate for high motion detail and low framerates for less or no motion detail)

    It will still capture "up to" 100,000 frames per second when there is motion in the video but capture far less when there is no motion and still look as if the entire video is 100,000 frames per second using the meta data to regulate the playback speed

    DUH

    You will get the exact same quality output using Megabytes to Gigabytes of data as you are now getting with Terabytes and spending far less money that is most likely not yours!

    Double DUH
     
  6. Squid Surprise

    Squid Surprise TS Evangelist Posts: 2,568   +1,548

    I don't think you understand the purpose of this telescope... it's supposed to be the most powerful in the world - you're not gonna skimp when you've already gotten approval for it...

    And it's looking at SPACE - 24 hours a day, 7 days a week... EVERYTHING needs to be at high detail, ALL THE TIME! Variable frame rates are useless here!
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2019
  7. Lew Zealand

    Lew Zealand TS Guru Posts: 770   +657

    Or you could just turn it off when there's no motion.

    And you're assuming that there's a time when there's no motion. Chemical reactions rarely just sit there waiting for the proper lighting conditions.

    Meh, I'm sure you totally thought of stuff they didn't.
     
    Squid Surprise likes this.
  8. Bullwinkle M

    Bullwinkle M TS Booster Posts: 145   +74

    "I'm sure you totally thought of stuff they didn't."
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------
    I'd think that was obvious
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2019
  9. Bullwinkle M

    Bullwinkle M TS Booster Posts: 145   +74



    I don't think you understand the purpose of this MICROSCOPE...
    With my method, everything IS in high detail
    The Memory buffer prevents missing any motion at all
    we can simply eliminate the duplicate frames and play it pack as if all the frames were there....
    and yes, I obviously thought of stuff they diddn't

    The idea is to match the frame rate to the rate of reaction under study and mask off and/or deduplicate areas of the image that have nothing to do with the reaction being studied

    Concentrate just on the data you need
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2019
  10. toooooot

    toooooot TS Evangelist Posts: 886   +427

    Now make some cool slowmotion vids
     
    erickmendes likes this.
  11. fktech

    fktech TS Maniac Posts: 528   +141

    Wow!
     
  12. Squid Surprise

    Squid Surprise TS Evangelist Posts: 2,568   +1,548

    This isn't a one-time-use TELESCOPE!!!

    Yes, they want to check for a pulsar, but they'll be using it ALL THE TIME!! And they are looking into the infinite cosmos - there is ALWAYS MOVEMENT!!

    Do you really think you're smarter than the giant team of brilliant scientists and engineers who are creating this? I'm all for arrogance, but you're going a bit far...
     
    Lew Zealand likes this.
  13. Lew Zealand

    Lew Zealand TS Guru Posts: 770   +657

    Hee hee!
     

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