New Intel Core i7 4820k potential

I bought a new machine, basically to work with VM Workstation, but I'm wanting to know if there is more to this machine by tweaking it or should I just leave it as it is?
 

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GhostRyder

Posts: 2,151   +588
I would leave it as is, there is no reason to have that much extra performance on the chip if your doing VM workstation stuff. You can overclock it if you want so long as you have a decent cooler attached, but I do not see a reason for you to do it.
 
I would leave it as is, there is no reason to have that much extra performance on the chip if your doing VM workstation stuff. You can overclock it if you want so long as you have a decent cooler attached, but I do not see a reason for you to do it.

Thanks, thought it had enough processor and RAM to do the what I needed, just read a lot of tweaking like you mentioned, over clocking, but also read where you have to be very careful as well.
 

LNCPapa

Posts: 4,314   +574
TS Special Forces
I know this is a little off topic but I was curious to know if you bought the machine pre-built or if you built it yourself. I personally don't see the point of going LGA2011 and then only getting a quad core CPU - especially if running VMs is going to be one of the primary tasks for the machine. The price difference between this 2011 chip and the next one up that is 6 core is only about $200 so it baffles me that these x8xx chips sell at all.

Closer to being on topic - if the current setup currently performs well for you then I'd leave things alone. You probably won't start seeing performance issues till you run multiple VMs simultaneously and even then only if those VMs are busy.
 
I know this is a little off topic but I was curious to know if you bought the machine pre-built or if you built it yourself. I personally don't see the point of going LGA2011 and then only getting a quad core CPU - especially if running VMs is going to be one of the primary tasks for the machine. The price difference between this 2011 chip and the next one up that is 6 core is only about $200 so it baffles me that these x8xx chips sell at all.

Yes, it was pre-configured and I had a budget I had to stick to, per company. I do appreciate the information though, as if we go for another purchase, we'll keep that in mind. Thanks

Closer to being on topic - if the current setup currently performs well for you then I'd leave things alone. You probably won't start seeing performance issues till you run multiple VMs simultaneously and even then only if those VMs are busy.

Currently I'm building VMs for testing purposes of applications in different OS's. Eventually I'll build them here and if they are what we need, roll them up to our ESXi infrastructure.
 

Ziad

Posts: 20   +1
I know this is a little off topic but I was curious to know if you bought the machine pre-built or if you built it yourself. I personally don't see the point of going LGA2011 and then only getting a quad core CPU - especially if running VMs is going to be one of the primary tasks for the machine. The price difference between this 2011 chip and the next one up that is 6 core is only about $200 so it baffles me that these x8xx chips sell at all.

Closer to being on topic - if the current setup currently performs well for you then I'd leave things alone. You probably won't start seeing performance issues till you run multiple VMs simultaneously and even then only if those VMs are busy.

With all do respect, allow me to unbaffle you,
People buy this chip who mainly need the extra lanes. As is with my case, two 780s & LSI RAID card. It's not a matter of money but I have absolutely No need for the extra two cores.
 

Darth Shiv

Posts: 2,166   +758
Yes... it is a bit ridiculous you only get 16 PCIe lanes for graphics or other large PCIe devices on an LGA1150 motherboard. It's been several gens now that the consumer line has been so restricted.

Intel has been extremely poor in moving ahead with things such as the SATA and USB interface advancements and that has been saturated for years now. To get around the bandwidth issues, you look to the PCIe bus but they starve that too unless you want to go back a CPU generation on the LGA2011 platform.

Will be interesting to see Haswell-E when it arrives.