Noctua's massive 3.3-pound fanless cooler goes into mass production

jpuroila

Posts: 351   +205
While I can see the value of this for OEMs, I don't see the point of this for the DIY aftermarket. My R7-1700 and R5-3600X both came with Wraith Spire good stock coolers and I can also just latch one of my AM2/AM3 coolers onto an AM4 motherboard.

OEMs? OEMs don't particularly care if they make computers that are noisy. This is for DIY people and system integrators who want to make their computers as silent as possible.
 

ypsylon

Posts: 368   +288
I think that I may have been the only one that got it. I don't know what alchemist83's problem is.
4rcdii.jpg
Oh dear you got Like just for the awesome Alfred Bester. :)

Anyway. It's pretty sizeable chunk of metal. I don't know if I would want to run it completely passive. Even so 600 or 800 rpm 120 mm fan is completely inaudible even at night. I understand passive cooling in NUCs, but frankly I see no point in desktop environment unless you're in sound proof room or something doing research. Single slowest fan is better than no fan. Convection cannot be relied to do all the stuff. Especially with pressure cookers as Intel 14nm++++++++++++++++ if there is no airflow in case at all. Doesn't really make sense.

Yeah and you've mentioned Thermalright True Copper. I had it in my hands, in the end went with same design, but more classic aluminium fins. You could easily kill like 3 people at once with TC. Absolutely monstrous cooler heavy as a sack of bricks and there were numerous stories where people cracked the motherboard PCB because of the weight and tight case fit.
 

JamesBlond

Posts: 101   +60
Imagine all the people who come up with these heat sinks designed a case with proper airflow.... one day, 2029 somebody will make a case that has great airflow and can have 6 standard 3.5in drive bays and 2 ssd bays on the side of the case, slightly wider than normal, but still sleek and sexy, with plenty of space for 9 quiet fans and a good extraction point for GPU heat.... well, that would be so amazing
 

Avro Arrow

Posts: 1,492   +1,722
TechSpot Elite
OEMs? OEMs don't particularly care if they make computers that are noisy. This is for DIY people and system integrators who want to make their computers as silent as possible.
It all depends on application. If you're an OEM that has a customer that requires their computers to have ultimate long-term reliability (like in the medical field), then this is one less moving vital part. The overwhelming majority of DIY applications are for gaming or other high-performance applications. This doesn't really lend itself to that. Maybe you should watch the video from Greg Salazar and then ask yourself "How many DIY builders are really going to be interested in a fanless solution that limits what their CPU will be capable of?" because I can't think of any. People who only engage in light use of their PCs tend to be the ignorant masses who tend to buy craptops or "brand-in-a-box" desktops.

The only DIY application that I could see this being useful for is the HTPC but most people throw those together from spare parts that they no longer use. In those cases, sure, this might be useful but if I know Noctua, this will not be cheap and the sound of an HTPC can be mitigated simply by putting next to, or behind the TV, a good distance from where your sofa is.
 

Avro Arrow

Posts: 1,492   +1,722
TechSpot Elite
Oh dear you got Like just for the awesome Alfred Bester. :)
Thanks for that! Yeah, I'll never forget that scene where he's deliberately but subtly trolling then-security chief Zack Allen. When Zack storms off, he turns to Sheridan and says:

"Mr. Allen seems to be under a great deal of stress. I don't think he is eating right. Make sure he gets enough fibre. That's always important." <- Is there anything more 90s than saying to eat more fibre? LOL

I was of course paraphrasing for the meme. I remember that I almost bust a gut laughing because the look on Walter Koenig's face as he was saying it was absolutely priceless. It was clear that he was having the time of his life in that role and who could blame him? His portrayal of Alfred Bester was so good that I consider it to be on par with Andrew Robinson's portrayal of Elim Garak.
Anyway. It's pretty sizeable chunk of metal. I don't know if I would want to run it completely passive. Even so 600 or 800 rpm 120 mm fan is completely inaudible even at night. I understand passive cooling in NUCs, but frankly I see no point in desktop environment unless you're in sound proof room or something doing research. Single slowest fan is better than no fan. Convection cannot be relied to do all the stuff. Especially with pressure cookers as Intel 14nm++++++++++++++++ if there is no airflow in case at all. Doesn't really make sense.
Yeah, I don't really think that there will be a tonne of demand for this. Computers have gotten quieter and quieter over the decades and people survived just fine before. I wonder how many of the people who whine about computer noise lived during the time of the dot-matrix printer. :D
Yeah and you've mentioned Thermalright True Copper. I had it in my hands, in the end went with same design, but more classic aluminium fins. You could easily kill like 3 people at once with TC. Absolutely monstrous cooler heavy as a sack of bricks and there were numerous stories where people cracked the motherboard PCB because of the weight and tight case fit.
Actually, that wasn't me because before your post I honestly can't remember ever hearing of it before. I initially thought that you were referring to some kind of thermal paste until I googled it. Honestly, it's beautiful!:heart_eyes: I really love the all-copper look of it. The only CPU coolers that I've ever purchased were a CoolerMaster Hyper 212, a Zalman AIO and a Deepcool Gamm Archer that was on sale at Canada Computers for about $6. Thanks for showing it to me though, it's such a nice-looking cooler and I usually couldn't care less what they look like. When it comes to CPU coolers, I'm always of the opinion that it either works or it doesn't and they all work because it's such a vital part of the PC so I never really pay much attetion to them. :laughing:
 
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Lionvibez

Posts: 2,341   +1,884
so your solution to cooling is a cooler that turns into a heater once the pump fails one way or another.
Interesting choice.

I've never had a pump failure on any AIO I've used so yes its a good choice for me. You are not talking to someone that is new at this I've used air coolers for the greater part of 20 years but right now I will go AIO over air everyday all day.
 

Ludak021

Posts: 472   +352
I've never had a pump failure on any AIO I've used so yes its a good choice for me. You are not talking to someone that is new at this I've used air coolers for the greater part of 20 years but right now I will go AIO over air everyday all day.

I do know that pumps will fail, sooner or later, yours just didn't die , yet.
Everything that has moving parts breaks eventually.

edit: maybe try sticking with one, not just getting rid of them for newer ones. Following that logic, my car never broke. I always sell them after 2 years since buying.
 

Crinkles

Posts: 116   +112
I do know that pumps will fail, sooner or later, yours just didn't die , yet.
Everything that has moving parts breaks eventually.

Does that include industrial styled fans??

edit: maybe try sticking with one, not just getting rid of them for newer ones. Following that logic, my car never broke. I always sell them after 2 years since buying.

Drive a Noctua the brand that NEVER stops! But, I haven't had an AIO fail either. God, the anecctotal evidence showing a failure of AIO's to fail piles up fast.
 

Ludak021

Posts: 472   +352
" Does that include industrial styled fans?? "
Are you joking?

And I hate Noctua fyi, overpriced, often very ugly, and I have a CPU cooler from Megahalems. I'm good.
 

Crinkles

Posts: 116   +112
" Does that include industrial styled fans?? "

Are you joking?

Yeah and I really don't care what components people use.

And I hate Noctua fyi, overpriced, often very ugly, and I have a CPU cooler from Megahalems. I'm good.

I don't hate them but I don't appreciate their choice for doodie brown plastic. Man there is nothing that looks good "in brown". Their fan blades are tops in any case.
 

TheBigT42

Posts: 552   +503
I find it more concerning you have zero grasp of CPU coolers yet comment freely as if informed! 95 Kelvin is impossible, 95 Fahrenheit would be truly amazing but totally unrealistic and 95 Celsius is whats expected and bloody obvious, hence no reason to define as its assumed those reading this article have a brain and some knowledge of computing.
You obviosity need the /s to understand sarcasm. Lighten up dude.
95 Celsius is too damn hot for a CPU to run at anyway
 

Lionvibez

Posts: 2,341   +1,884
I do know that pumps will fail, sooner or later, yours just didn't die , yet.
Everything that has moving parts breaks eventually.

edit: maybe try sticking with one, not just getting rid of them for newer ones. Following that logic, my car never broke. I always sell them after 2 years since buying.

Considering the AIO is a year old I'm not worried about it at all. When I decide to do a full system upgrade in about 5+ years on a new socket I will be replacing it at that point.

I've been doing this long enough I know what I'm doing thanks.
 

Tom Sunday

Posts: 61   +9
Noctua Problems: Looks like "Alder Lake" Intel's 12th generation processor is expected to launch in the second half of 2021.This is basically right around the corner and proffering a 10nm SuperFin process, a new LGA 1700 socket and DDR5. A huge and significant architectural upgrade in itself. Important: The new Intel 12th generation CPU is also much larger than any socket Intel ever pushed into the mainstream. The socket dimensions for LGA 1700 will be 37.5mm x 45mm, which is about 7.5mm taller than Intel's current LGA 1200. Does this mean that my just purchased "Corsair Capellix" for $170 is practically outdated and needs scrapping if I want to fly or upgrade later in 2021 to Alder Lake? New AIO's supposed to give anyone 5-years of sterling service? Surely my new Capellix AIO footprint may not cover or adequately cool the new LGA 1700 'rectangle' looking socket. In turn the new 3.3 pound "Noctua Passive Gorilla" will therefore also be a short-lived honeymoon. Money out of the window? Am I missing something here? And I wonder what other current hardware I should not be buying as it may not play nice with Alder Lake and friends and prohibits any existing case hardware carryover's or transfers. Thoughts anyone?
 
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Crinkles

Posts: 116   +112
Noctua Problems: Looks like "Alder Lake" Intel's 12th generation processor is expected to launch in the second half of 2021.This is basically right around the corner and proffering a 10nm SuperFin process, a new LGA 1700 socket and DDR5. A huge and significant architectural upgrade in itself. Important: The new Intel 12th generation CPU is also much larger than any socket Intel ever pushed into the mainstream. The socket dimensions for LGA 1700 will be 37.5mm x 45mm, which is about 7.5mm taller than Intel's current LGA 1200. Does this mean that my just purchased "Corsair Capellix" for $170 is practically outdated and needs scrapping if I want to fly or upgrade later in 2021 to Alder Lake? New AIO's supposed to give anyone 5-years of sterling service? Surely my new Capellix AIO footprint may not cover or adequately cool the new LGA 1700 'rectangle' looking socket. In turn the new 3.3 pound "Noctua Passive Gorilla" will therefore also be a short-lived honeymoon. Money out of the window? Am I missing something here? And I wonder what other current hardware I should not be buying as it may not play nice with Alder Lake and friends and prohibits any existing case hardware carryover's or transfers. Thoughts anyone?

Brass standoffs? This may not be ideal but might be suitable.

 

Tom Sunday

Posts: 61   +9
[QUOTE="Crinkles said: "Brass standoffs? "

Yes these are indeed 100% screw compatible and generation proof. But that is what I thought about my first wife as well and nevertheless got screwed in the end.
 

jpuroila

Posts: 351   +205
It all depends on application. If you're an OEM that has a customer that requires their computers to have ultimate long-term reliability (like in the medical field), then this is one less moving vital part. The overwhelming majority of DIY applications are for gaming or other high-performance applications. This doesn't really lend itself to that. Maybe you should watch the video from Greg Salazar and then ask yourself "How many DIY builders are really going to be interested in a fanless solution that limits what their CPU will be capable of?" because I can't think of any. People who only engage in light use of their PCs tend to be the ignorant masses who tend to buy craptops or "brand-in-a-box" desktops.

The only DIY application that I could see this being useful for is the HTPC but most people throw those together from spare parts that they no longer use. In those cases, sure, this might be useful but if I know Noctua, this will not be cheap and the sound of an HTPC can be mitigated simply by putting next to, or behind the TV, a good distance from where your sofa is.
I'm pretty sure the kind of OEM PCs that are totally fanless will be using laptop parts and not a massive 2kg cooler.

And yes, it most definitely is a niche product, but at the same time, it's rated for 120W, so it shouldn't be too limiting for people who don't intend to OC. But the kind of person who wants a totally silent PC is willing to compromise on performance anyway.