Should you pay up if you get hit by ransomware?

learninmypc

TS Evangelist
It might be your worst nightmare. You turn on your PC only to discover it’s been hijacked by ransomware that won’t decrypt your files unless you pay up. Should you? What are the pros and cons of paying off cyber-criminals?

It’s a difficult problem, and one with many layers. To access your files, you might need to pay a hefty ransom. And then there’s the issue of cryptocurrency, which is ransomware’s preferred method of payment. Unless you’re already a crypto investor, you might have no idea how to begin the process of getting a Bitcoin account—and the clock is ticking.FULL ARTICLE
 
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AdrianG001

TS Rookie
Never. Do not assume that once you pay you will get your files back, often times these hackers will look to determine what they think you owe, so after you pay if they think you owe more, then they’ll ask for more. Never negotiate with hackers, they will bankrupt you if you let them.

If your data is important, you should be running a backup anyways, restore from a backup and you’re free of infection and you get your data back.

If you don’t have a backup, that’s on you at the end of the day. Do a clean install of the OS and implement a better system for next time.

Regards,
Adrian
 
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captaincranky

TechSpot Addict
Popular among the attackers. God, I can't believe I'm having to say this.
Nobody asked you to restate the obvious. I still think "prominent" or "prevalent" are better terms for an increased frequency of attacks. Ransomware is obviously already "popular" among it's users. Which tacitly makes your statement obvious or unnecessary.

You have little to nothing to teach me about English Cliff, so skip all the feigned exasperation and unwarranted condescension.
 

captaincranky

TechSpot Addict
No. these attacks will get more popular after paying for it.
I'm still having a hard time getting my head around the term "popular", as being appropriate for the apparent rush a criminal gets from committing a crime. I full well realize it's a semantic point I'm making.

It's certainly true that as ransomware attacks become more successful, they will become more often attempted, and more widely used. So, for that reason, I think that "more pervasive", or, "more prevalent", are better much descriptors.

After all, "hula-hoops" were popular, with all factors in the trend apparently enjoying themselves.With ransomware, we have a "predator versus prey" dynamic, which is enough the make some weaker minded individuals change the channel during a nature documentary...In any event, I wouldn't pay a ransom to get my "data" back. (I think "data" and "solution" are the 2 hokiest terms and most annoyingly overused terms of the past 2 decades, but that's neither here nor there).

My personal solution to the risk of malware in all its forms, is to not hook up computers with that much of my informational content, to the internet in the first place.

Second, I just converted all of my Win 7 machines to SSD. Which leaves me with the original HDDS, intact with both OS and program installations ready to reemerge as "C:/" drives at a moment's notice.

I should expedite buying more SSDs, and transfer current state system information to them, while keeping the current state SSDs ready for a reinstall, should it become necessary (This is pretty much the idea behind the infamous "restore discs", which come with prebuilt computers. But without the bloat of vaporware,or any references to an AOL subscription).

One thing that has to be noted in spite of their intrusive data gathering practices,, Google is really good at nipping spam and phishing attempts in the bud on their Gmail platform.

I'm a retiree, and fairly well isolated from threats to which a business worker or systems might be exposed. Those things said, I normally don't give ransomware or its possible devastating effects a second thought.
 
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cliffordcooley

TS Redneck
I'm still having a hard time getting my head around the term "popular", as being appropriate for the apparent rush a criminal gets from committing a crime.
No, what you are doing is taking the word "popular" out of context and weighing it against the entire world instead of the intended group*.

Ohh and by the way you were condescending, when you came in disrupting the thread. And then had the audacity to call me condescending for replying. I suggest you shut up and move on. As far as that book you like typing, TLDR.

*Worldwide all the popular kids in school are not so popular. That doesn't mean the word popular can't be used.
 

captaincranky

TechSpot Addict
...[ ]....Ohh and by the way you were condescending, when you came in disrupting the thread. And then had the audacity to call me condescending for replying. I suggest you shut up and move on. As far as that book you like typing, TLDR....[ ]...
Being "popular" in school, has only a vague connection with the predatory practice of employing.ransomware to commit major financial crimes.

And you're right I should "shut up" because you're "popular", and I'm not.. Now try reading my mind to figure out what I think you should do.

This thread opened with a moral dilemma as to what to do in the event of a malware attack..

"learningmypc's threads always seem to be ripe for the disturbing anyway. I normally don't bother, but I rather enjoy being talked down to by you. It's when the Cliff leopard shows its true spots.

Now why don't you toddle along, and "guardian fight", with someone you're actually a mental match for.
 
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captaincranky

TechSpot Addict
In response to @learningmyPC original question.

Of course you shouldn't pay off a ransomware attack.

You should have:

1: Another C;/ drive with your OS and programs installed already installed.

2: A separate air gapped machine with all your important information stored there.instead of your web browsing junker. Consider the machine you surf with, "expendable", period.

You should NOT ever, use Window's library functions, "my pictures, my videos, etc..Windows is designed with the idea (of necessity), that a computer will have only one storage drive throughout its lifetime. Anybody who stores their "data" all on C;?, deserves whatever fate or ills might befall them.
And BTW, considering the unlikely event a private citizen would be hit with ransomware , as opposed to a hospital, community government, or other public service, I'm not sure this is a question entirely worth, or needs, asking.

You've been here plenty long enough to be aware of safety and backup protocols, and you should be employing as a matter of course.
 

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