The Boring Company drops plans to develop Westside LA tunnel following environmental lawsuit

Polycount

TS Evangelist
Staff member

Elon Musk is certainly a man with some interesting ideas, but not all his plans proceed uninhibited. That was made clear today, as Musk's Boring Company has officially canceled its plans to develop a high-speed track underneath Los Angeles' Westside region.

This decision is a result of a legal battle between The Boring Company and two Westside community-interest groups. The groups filed a suit against the company, alleging that the planned tunnel shouldn't have been exempted from an in-depth environmental impact review.

Rather than fight the suit to the bitter end, Musk and co. decided to "amicably" settle it, though the exact terms of the agreement are unknown due to the confidential nature of the talks.

The Boring Company isn't completely out of luck, though. Los Angeles Times reports that Musk's company will shift its focus to another planned tunnel which is a mere 3.5 miles away. Said tunnel will stretch between Dodger Stadium and Metro station.

It's unclear whether or not Musk will return to LA's Westside for future Boring Company plans, but for now, the company has plenty of other projects in the works. The company's first finished tunnel, for example, is set to launch for the public on December 10 - it will stretch from SpaceX's Hawthorne headquarters to an LA suburb.

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Adhmuz

TechSpot Paladin
Just curious, what environmental dangers, besides hitting underground water streams, does this tunnel pose?
The snooty rich A holes of LA's Westside simply didn't like the idea of having a tunnel dug under them and found a way to get it halted. Is anyone really surprised?
 
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captaincranky

TechSpot Addict
I would be more concerned about Musk rooting around under the skyscrapers in downtown LA. Those big building foundations go down several stories.

I would think planning infrastructure is the city's job, since it has to be connected with street level, or/and underground access points. I expect Musk thinks his idea is great, and it doesn't need scrutiny, or zoning permits, or intervention by government. (Unless of course, they're giving him a tax break, then he's all ears).

Besides, with Musk you have to wonder if he petitioned for right of way under those people's houses, or did he assume it would be bestowed on him gratis.
 
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captaincranky

TechSpot Addict
The snooty rich A holes of LA's Westside simply didn't like the idea of having a tunnel dug under them and found a way to get it halted. Is anyone really surprised?
Easy to condescend when you don't live there. Suppose Musk decided to run a tunnel under your home? Are you buying or renting?
 
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ChrisH1

TS Addict
The snooty rich A holes of LA's Westside simply didn't like the idea of having a tunnel dug under them and found a way to get it halted. Is anyone really surprised?
Easy to condescend when you don't live there. Suppose Musk decided to run a tunnel under your home? Are you buying or renting?
Depends how far down. If 10 metres, sure, I'd have a problem if no-one asked me. If 250 metres, wouldn't worry me in the slightest.