VESA says there's no such thing as DisplayHDR 2000 monitors

midian182

Posts: 6,794   +61
Staff member
In context: We recently heard rumors that a couple of upcoming gaming monitors would be the first to carry VESA’s DisplayHDR 2000 certification. But the association behind the DisplayHDR standard says there’s a problem with this claim: DisplayHDR 2000 doesn’t exist, at least not yet.

Chinese retail website Taobao recently listed two monitors—a new version of the Samsung Odyssey G9 and a new Acer EI491CRG9—both of which appeared to carry a DisplayHDR 2000 logo, indicating they will reach 2,000 nits brightness.

According to VESA’s displayHDR.org website, its certifications start at DisplayHDR 400 and reach DisplayHDR 1400, with each level requiring a greater level of brightness and contrast ratio (among other things) than the last.

Responding to reports of the DisplayHDR 2000 listings, VESA wrote that “There is no ‘DisplayHDR 2000’ tier in the VESA DisplayHDR specification and logo program at this time.”

“VESA has no knowledge of the origins of the DisplayHDR 2000 logo currently posted on these display listings on the Taobao website. However, VESA takes any misuse of our trademarks and logos seriously.”

The organization did not rule out the new standard arriving, but it’s certainly not here yet.

“VESA does not endorse the use of this logo unless and until a DisplayHDR 2000 tier has been officially announced by VESA,” it added. “Until the displayhdr.org website displays DisplayHDR 2000, any such logo usage should be assumed to be unapproved and deceptive.”

Rumors that the next Samsung Odyssey G9 would come with 2,000 nits brightness and mini-LED tech were around before the Taobao listing. Samsung, unsurprisingly, has not commented on the monitor's specs.

Permalink to story.

 

VitalyT

Posts: 5,567   +5,259
VESA is supposed to set standards, and manufactories are supposed to follow those. When manufacturers create products that go beyond VESA standards, because they do not want to wait for VESA to wake up, the latter becomes a dead weight, which only slows the progress.

VESA has no knowledge of the origins of the DisplayHDR 2000
Does VESA know of the technological progress on the market? My guess they don't even care. And the manufacturers will do the right thing to tell VESA to screw off, and let the progress move forward.

LG has had OLED TV-s on the market capable of 2000 nits of brightness for more than a year now.
 

dangh

Posts: 229   +293
Does VESA know of the technological progress on the market? My guess they don't even care. And the manufacturers will do the right thing to tell VESA to screw off, and let the progress move forward.

wth are you talking about? VESA is providing certificates that says a product can achieve some standards.
Manufacturer can display VESA logo which cost money to indicate the product match those standards.
Manufacturer can create a 10 000 nits screen, but there is only HDR 1000 logo, so they can use only that one (if other requirements of HDR 1000 are matched as well).
Manufacturer as well do not have to use any VESA logo at all, they doing it only for their own advertisement.
Manufacturer have no right to use a non - existing VESA logo, as it is VESA trademark and IP.

There is no issue with LG having 2000 nits. This do not require VESA to create another standard. If this LG ticks all the boxes it can easily use the HDR 1000 logo. And they can put LG 2000 logo, if they are willing to create one.

Manufacturer do not depend on VESA at anything, and it is normal, that manufacturers exceeds standards. Standards here are for consumers to be sure, that whatever they are buying matches certain criteria and simplifies decision making.
 

VitalyT

Posts: 5,567   +5,259
Manufacturer can display VESA logo which cost money to indicate the product match those standards.

This is what it is mostly about these days, charging manufacturers for the logo.

And it is often as useless as stickers on salmon cans that state the fish was caught in the ocean, the same stickers salmon farmers buy easily. And it is as useless as investment AAA ratings that agencies are simply selling to any willing buyer.

Dude, wake up!
 

Avro Arrow

Posts: 1,256   +1,386
TechSpot Elite
Meh, it's a screen. The reason that TV and computer stores have the TVs and monitors side by side is because that's the only way that you'd ever know that there was a difference. Our tech has advanced to the point that even the "crappy" displays look amazing.

This is why car audio enthusiasts have become so rare compared to the 90s. When you can get flawless digital sound out of a $10 microchip, there's no way to undercut anyone by making an "inferior" product.

These VESA standards are probably legit but don't have nearly the variances that their names would suggest. Even if HDR2000 is fake, the rest of their "standards" are probably semi-fake at best.
 

Gypsygib

Posts: 109   +102
If VESA is going to allow all these HDR 400 monitors to meet the criteria for HDR and be able to include an HDR certification on the box, without any form of local dimming and contrast ratios in ~750:1-1000:1 range, then they should have no issues with a monitor claiming HDR 2000 that actually has real local dimming.

HDR 400 is a joke and shouldn't exist. "Real" HDR 400 will look MUCH worse than "Fake" HDR 2000 with local dimming.
 

jpuroila

Posts: 332   +183
This is what it is mostly about these days, charging manufacturers for the logo.

And it is often as useless as stickers on salmon cans that state the fish was caught in the ocean, the same stickers salmon farmers buy easily. And it is as useless as investment AAA ratings that agencies are simply selling to any willing buyer.

Dude, wake up!
Two wrongs don't make a right in this case. If VESA standards are so bad, the manufacturers should create better ones and use those instead. I'm not a huge fan of IP laws in their current state, but this just seems like a pretty clear cut case of deceptive advertising.