Windows 11 features could have released as an update for Windows 10, says analyst

zakislam

Posts: 52   +1
Why it matters: Analyst firm Gartner says Windows 11 doesn't offer enough to justify a quick adoption rate, at least among businesses. Instead, it highlights how the latest operating system version is more of a "rallying point" for the industry.

In its "Positioning Windows 11 and Preparing to Deploy" report (via The Register), Gartner research vice president Stephen Kleynhans says Microsoft's latest OS iteration offers an "overdue facelift," while commending new features including the new Microsoft Store, Android app support, and the removal of Internet Explorer (in favor of its Edge browser).

However, "all of these capabilities could have been released as just another feature update for Windows 10." The decision to include them in Windows 11 is more about creating excitement around the new name, as opposed to offering meaningful change, he argued. By calling it Windows 11, Microsoft "has created a marketing opportunity for the PC ecosystem."

"A new OS version acts as a rallying point for the industry – something that has been missing since Windows 10 launched six years ago," Kleynhans stated. He also added that "the move to the Windows-as-a-service model with Windows 10 had left the question of support for outdated hardware somewhat unclear and arbitrary."

Even though it may not warrant the new title, with Windows 11, Microsoft has consequently gained "an opportunity to establish a new more modern baseline and limit this legacy burden, without impacting existing Windows 10 users."

Kleynhans believes Windows 11's most noteworthy change is its move to just one feature update per year, as opposed to Windows 10 releasing them twice a year. "This model more closely matches what most enterprises are effectively doing with Windows 10 feature updates today," Kleynhans said.

The analyst suggested that businesses shouldn't rush into upgrading their systems to Windows 11. "Enterprises should run small pilots in 2022 using the initial Windows 11 21H2 release, to develop familiarity with the new UX and understand potential user and support impact," he noted.

For enterprises, Kleynhans doesn't expect they'll be eager to upgrade in the coming years. "By early 2023, less than ten percent of new enterprise PCs will be deployed with Windows 11," he anticipates. As for consumers, it's a similar outlook; over 60 percent of PC users don't even know about Windows 11's launch.

The lukewarm reception for the OS, meanwhile, accompanies some notable issues the operating system is experiencing. Microsoft's decision to impose a controversial system requirement, TPM 2.0, could also prevent mass adoption in the near future.

As we previously detailed, Windows 11 shares a lot in common with its predecessor. One change in particular stands out: modifications in the update engine could have been backported to Windows 10, and while update sizes will be reduced by up to 40 percent, that won't be available for Windows 10 users.

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takaozo

Posts: 8   +23
I can confirm no check is done for old CPU and TMP when installing from USB stick.
Just installed on i7 4790 and asus board with TMP 1.2.
Checks are done only for upgrading OS from 10.
 

yukka

Posts: 1,004   +158
You could argue that MacOS new yearly major updates could just be feature updates. They only support each version of the OS for 3 years. Theres an article on Slashdot that talked about it a while ago Slashdot.org
 

Uncle Al

Posts: 8,348   +7,156
From all I've seen so far with the upgrade you gain a few nice things, but also loose a number of good or better features. I'm sure Microsludge will eventually work it out ... but wouldn't it be nice if they did that BEFORE they released it to the public ..... yeah, just wishful thinking .... LOL
 

hahahanoobs

Posts: 3,849   +1,911
I can confirm no check is done for old CPU and TMP when installing from USB stick.
Just installed on i7 4790 and asus board with TMP 1.2.
Checks are done only for upgrading OS from 10.
Are you getting Windows Updates?
If not, then what's the point of running it on unsupported hardware?

Gartner opens by saying they don't think businesses will be quick to adopt it? Are they ever?
 
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netman

Posts: 680   +269
"However, "all of these capabilities could have been released as just another feature update for Windows 10." The decision to include them in Windows 11 is more about creating excitement around the new name, as opposed to offering meaningful change, he argued. By calling it Windows 11, Microsoft "has created a marketing opportunity for the PC ecosystem." "

Excitement...?! No, this an indirect confession the whole Windows 11 is a conspiracy to sell more PCs...?!
 

Setnom

Posts: 15   +18
Are you getting Windows Updates?

I installed it on my i7 7700K and got my chipset (Z270) drivers through Windows Update. Also, Windows Defender definitions, Security Updates for Visual C++ and two Windows 11 cumulative updates so far.

Everything was detected and updated just like in Windows 10. Well... everything but my old printer, LOL!
(HP Photosmart C3180, Windows 10 installs the basic drivers for it, Windows 11 doesn't).
 

hahahanoobs

Posts: 3,849   +1,911
I installed it on my i7 7700K and got my chipset (Z270) drivers through Windows Update. Also, Windows Defender definitions, Security Updates for Visual C++ and two Windows 11 cumulative updates so far.

Everything was detected and updated just like in Windows 10. Well... everything but my old printer, LOL!
(HP Photosmart C3180, Windows 10 installs the basic drivers for it, Windows 11 doesn't).
I guess Microsoft lied. Oh well, you're not complaining.
Did you get a BIOS update with W11 support? ASUS maybe?
 

Setnom

Posts: 15   +18
I guess Microsoft lied. Oh well, you're not complaining.
Did you get a BIOS update with W11 support? ASUS maybe?

I didn't (ASUS Maximus IX Hero). Asus hasn't updated the bios since April of 2018. But this motherboard supports TPM 2.0, I just needed to enable it (was disabled by default). Which, if I'm not mistaken, is what all the newer updates from ASUS (for older motherboards, that is) did: they just enabled TPM on the UEFI bios and that's it.
 

takaozo

Posts: 8   +23
Are you getting Windows Updates?
If not, then what's the point of running it on unsupported hardware?

Gartner opens by saying they don't think businesses will be quick to adopt it? Are they ever?
Yes updates are normal. All works.
 

Lew Zealand

Posts: 1,973   +2,305
TechSpot Elite
Apple stays with the OS 10.x name for 20 years, so Microsoft follows and says Windows X, uh 10 will be their permanent, last OS.

Apple then decides macOS numbering should match iOS and watchOS and increase by 1 major number each year. So macOS 11.

And Microsoft follows like a good dog and goes to 11. And the damn OS even looks like macOS 11.
 

seeprime

Posts: 626   +803
That was the original idea, as it was developed as Windows 10 Cobalt. Microsoft seems to want to support fewer old devices as it costs them money and "is hard". So, change system requirements without allowing for a slightly lower security level in Windows 10, and call it 11. They may eventually wish they stayed with the original Windows 10 Cobalt development plan, should most users reject Windows 11. After all, Windows 10 is also supported by 0patch and likely will continue to be supported with their superior micropatch system.
 

DukeJukem

Posts: 258   +276
I can confirm no check is done for old CPU and TMP when installing from USB stick.
Just installed on i7 4790 and asus board with TMP 1.2.
Checks are done only for upgrading OS from 10.
just make sure your motherboard has a tpm module installed. for some stupid reason my z97 gigabyte board doesnt and I cant clean install windows 11 from a usb I have to use tpm workaround scripts and upgrade from within windows 10
 

captaincranky

Posts: 17,646   +6,438
I am not interested in upgrading until they fix the Task Bar functionality.
I know exactly what you mean, I've had to move my task bar(s) up to the top of the screen, since I very often, have a 25 pound Maine coon cat laying on the desk in front of me,

This makes the bottom location for the task bar, (as well as the bottom third of the monitor, "useless"

I of course, am stuck in the "rut", known as "Windows 7".So, "7 come 11" is "off the table" so to speak, as I don't shoot craps with my operating systems.
 

yukka

Posts: 1,004   +158
I am not interested in upgrading until they fix the Task Bar functionality.
I downloaded a clock for my second d monitor taskbar from GitHub. Apart from that it’s a good os. Everything I own is in the cloud anyway so I’ll just wipe and go back to win10 easily enough. So far though, it’s been fine and free.
 

captaincranky

Posts: 17,646   +6,438
Analyst firm Gartner says Windows 11 doesn't offer enough to justify a quick adoption rate, at least among businesses. Instead, it highlights how the latest operating system version is more of a "rallying point" for the industry.
And I've said from Windows 10's inception, that "DX-12", could have been provided as an update fir Windows 7.

But then again, what do I know,? Plus, I lack the credentials to make that statement.
 

hahahanoobs

Posts: 3,849   +1,911
just make sure your motherboard has a tpm module installed. for some stupid reason my z97 gigabyte board doesnt and I cant clean install windows 11 from a usb I have to use tpm workaround scripts and upgrade from within windows 10
Z97 is pre-TPM 2.0. The TPM you're looking for is integrated into supported CPUs.

TPM supported CPUs:
AMD Zen+ and up.
Intel 7th gen and up.
 

mAdmAnDingo

Posts: 92   +81
Very strange, that.

It is strange. But I was thinking, what if MS meant W11 "feature" updates, not "all/normal" updates? So maybe, unsupported PCs can't receive Windows 11 yearly feature updates through Windows update, and instead would have to download the new Windows 11 feature update ISO, and do a clean install of it?

Kinda like unsupported PCs can only install Windows 11 now with a clean install, and can't upgrade to it from W10 (officially at least, without workaround scripts). What do you think? Could that be what MS meant?

I guess we will find out when the W11 yearly feature update comes around, but I am wondering what's going on myself, as I also understood MS saying "no updates" on unsupported hardware to mean "all updates", but perhaps that is not what MS meant. Some clarification from MS would be nice.
 
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hahahanoobs

Posts: 3,849   +1,911
It is strange. But I was thinking, what if MS meant W11 "feature" updates, not "all/normal" updates? So maybe, unsupported PCs can't receive Windows 11 yearly feature updates through Windows update, and instead would have to download the new Windows 11 feature update ISO, and do a clean install of it?

Kinda like unsupported PCs can only install Windows 11 now with a clean install, and can't upgrade to it from W10 (officially at least, without workaround scripts). What do you think? Could that be what MS meant?

I guess we will find out when the W11 yearly feature update comes around, but I am wondering what's going on myself, as I also understood MS saying "no updates" on unsupported hardware to mean "all updates", but perhaps that is not what MS meant. Some clarification from MS would be nice.
It's possible they haven't officially "flipped the switch" yet. It's possible you could have issues down the road.

“Devices that do not meet these system requirements will no longer be guaranteed to receive updates, including but not limited to security updates.” If you do get denied for a Windows update, you’ll have to download and install the patches manually.