Feature Index Page 8

  • Are Quad-core CPUs Finally Dead in 2019?

    Today we're discussing quad-core processors, namely how relevant they are in 2019. The last time we covered this specific topic was back in 2017, so this article means to explore if these budget quad-cores are worth buying for gamers, or are they dead on arrival.

    By Steven Walton on

  • Nvidia's DLSS Second Take: Metro Exodus Investigation

    It's time for our final look into Metro Exodus, exploring the game's DLSS implementation which is exclusive to GeForce RTX graphics cards. We've been covering both ray tracing and DLSS closely, testing where it makes sense and following up as patches are released. As one of the key features on Nvidia's flagship RTX graphics card, the discussion is not only relevant but necessary.

    By Tim Schiesser on

  • Battlefield V DLSS Tested: Overpromised, Underdelivered

    Nvidia's deep learning super sampling, or DLSS, is one of the highly anticipated features present on RTX graphics cards. This month DLSS finally made its way to both Battlefield V and Metro Exodus, and as is the usual case for us, we'll be going through a full visual and performance breakdown in this article.

    By Tim Schiesser on

  • Metro Exodus Ray Tracing Benchmarked

    It's time for us to talk about ray tracing once again, this time in Metro Exodus, the latest game to integrate support for Nvidia's RTX technology. Metro Exodus looks to be a better showcase for DXR as a slower paced, open-world shooter that uses ray-traced global illumination. The game is launching with ray tracing and DLSS support from day one.

    By Tim Schiesser on

  • Best Value FreeSync Monitors for GeForce Owners

    Ever since Nvidia opened up support for adaptive sync monitors on GeForce GPUs, we've been receiving requests asking what FreeSync monitors we would recommend. The focus on this article will be on gaming and best value.

    By Tim Schiesser on

  • Is 6GB VRAM Enough for 1440p Gaming? Testing Usage with Nvidia's RTX 2060

    Today we're investigating claims that the new GeForce RTX 2060 is not a good buy because it only features 6GB VRAM capacity. The RTX 2060 offers performance similar to the GTX 1070 Ti, but that card packs an 8GB memory buffer, as did its non-Ti counterpart. In other words, the RTX 2060 is the fastest graphics card to ever to come with a 6GB memory buffer.

    By Steven Walton on

  • 10+ Tools for Finding and Deleting Duplicate Files on Windows

    We've covered many ways that you can save space on your storage drives over the years and deleting duplicate files on your system could easily result in a sizable clean out if only a few large files are found. Although Windows doesn't provide a direct solution, there are many apps that can help, so here's a quick look at them.

    By TechSpot Staff on

  • Using FreeSync with Nvidia GPUs Examined

    To the surprise of many, Nvidia has backed down from their G-Sync tower and enabled Nvidia GPU owners to use adaptive sync with a wide range of FreeSync monitors. The feature was announced during CEO Jensen Huang CES 2019 keynote and this week it's been enabled by the latest GeForce drivers.

    By Tim Schiesser on

  • Why Building a Gaming PC Right Now is a Good Idea: Good Timing, Great Hardware, Right Prices

    What a difference a year makes. It was about this time last year that we discussed why building a gaming PC was a bad idea, but thankfully a lot has changed since. You may recall, DDR4 memory and graphics card prices were through the roof a year ago. GPU availability was quite poor and on top of all that, we were at the end of a few product cycles. Fast forward a year, what's changed?

    By Steven Walton on

  • A Stroll Down Memory Lane: Best 3Dfx Glide Games

    Having a specialized 3d API was arguably both the highlight and the downfall for pioneer 3Dfx. The Glide API combined with Voodoo hardware truly enhanced the gaming experience. If you are old enough, odds are you owned a 3Dfx card and played some of these games. Let us take you a trip down memory lane and remember some of the best.

    By Shawn Knight on

  • The Ultimate Guide to Buying a Used Graphics Card

    There are many reasons why you would buy a used graphics card. First and foremost, the savings, of course. With the mining madness now over, we've been given the opportunity of buying graphics cards on the cheap. Also this past generation of GPUs also received a much longer than expected life cycle, meaning you are not getting overly old GPUs, but fairly serviceable gaming hardware.

    By Steven Walton on

  • 7 Tech Predictions for 2019

    Though it's a year shy of the big decade marker, 2019 looks to be one of the most exciting and most important years for the tech industry in some time. Thanks to the upcoming launch of 5G and foldable displays, as well as critical enhancements in AI, robotics, and other exciting areas, there's a palpable sense of expectation for the new year that we haven't felt for a while.

    By Bob O'Donnell on

  • Drama, Drugs and Data: A Profile of 10 Top Tech CEOs

    As the heads of some of the largest companies in the world, these chief executive officers make decisions that can affect our daily lives, but just how much do we really know about the filthy rich dudes in positions of power? We examine their careers, personalities, and histories, and make a lot of speculative guesses.

    By Rob Thubron on

  • How Many FPS Do You Need?

    Today we're addressing one of the most frequently asked questions we see about PC gaming: how many frames per second do you need? Should you be running at the same refresh rate as your monitor's, say 60 FPS on a 60 Hz display, or is there a benefit to running games at a much higher frame rate than your monitor can display, like say, 500 FPS?

    By Tim Schiesser on

  • Reinstall Windows 10 Without Deleting Your Software, Files or Settings

    We recently experienced an installation of Windows 10 with system files that were totally corrupt. After attempting typical repair options, we used a Windows 10 ISO to perform an in-place upgrade, reinstalling Windows 10 while preserving even the software you have installed.

    By Mark Turner on

  • Graphics Card Pricing Update: December 2018

    Time is running out for 2018 and this will be last update to our series before new GPUs possibly arrive in Q1 2019. In the meantime, we are seeing some interesting trends with further discounts and some previous generation GPUs running out of stock. Here's how prices have changed, what we expect in the future, and the current best value cards.

    By Tim Schiesser on

  • How Much RAM Do Gamers Need? 8GB vs. 16GB vs. 32GB

    Today we're looking into how much RAM you need to play the latest and greatest gaming titles. About this time each year we set on a memory capacity quest and last year's expedition lead us to conclude that for gamers 4GB is out, 8GB was the minimum, 16GB is the sweet spot and 32GB is overkill. Read on for our 2018 test.

    By Steven Walton on

  • The State of PC Gaming in 2018

    PC has never been a singular platform like, say, PlayStation or Xbox. Instead, it's a series of disparate landmasses sharing the same turbulent sea. PC gaming looks to become more fragmented than it's been in the past few years---for better and worse. More options means more chances for new ideas to flourish and, perhaps, for a new middle class of developers to emerge.

    By Heather Alexandra on

  • The Worst CPU & GPU Purchases of 2018

    If you want to know what graphics card you should buy or what's the best CPU for your new rig, we've already got you covered. Today we're discussing something else. Welcome to our second annual hall of hardware shame, where we list what we feel were the worst CPU and GPU purchases of 2018. Some of these products should have never existed, others are just a bit pointless or made promises they did not fulfill.

    By Steven Walton on

  • Standing Desk Starter Guide

    It can be easy to talk yourself out of standing at a computer desk. Besides parting with your favorite chair, the price of most adjustable models can discourage many. Read on for a practical outlook on what you can expect from your first standing desk, whether you're building something yourself or having one shipped to your door.

    By Mark Turner on

  • Ever Wondered How Those Computer-Controlled Christmas Light Displays Work?

    Depending on where you live, you've likely seen a house with crazy flashing Christmas lights that change color and dance to music. Almost every neighborhood or town has "that one house" that goes all out for the holidays each year. In my neighborhood, that house is mine.

    By William Gayde on

  • Custom PC for Work: Ordering a Machine from Puget Systems

    If you've been in the PC community for a while, you may have heard the name Puget Systems before. They are a custom system builder specializing in workstations and gaming PCs. This includes workloads such as engineering, content creation, 3D modeling, ML/AI, streaming, and more.

    By William Gayde on

  • Windows To Go: How to Install and Run Windows 10 from a USB Drive

    Did you know that a full copy of Windows can be installed and run from a USB drive? Microsoft introduced "Windows To Go" with Windows 8 Enterprise and has continued supporting the feature in Windows 10, which can be kept on a pen drive in your pocket as a portable operating system.

    By Mark Turner on

  • The Past, Present and Future of Diablo

    Since 2014 updates to Diablo III have been light and sporadic, and four years later, Blizzard's announcement of Diablo Immortal at a time when fans are hungry for any news of a Diablo IV has led to big questions about the future of the franchise. What's really going on with Diablo and what happened to Diablo III's long-term plan?

    By Jason Schreier on

  • Recommended 4K TVs That Can Effectively Be Used As Desktop PC Monitors

    If you're interested in replacing your desktop monitor with a 4K TV and want to know what to buy, you've come to the right place. Maybe you aren't quite sure where to start or could use a hand in narrowing your search. Whatever the case, this guide is intended to help steer you in the right direction.

    By Shawn Knight on

  • Buying an MP3 Player in 2018

    While most people who enjoy music on the go these days are listening from their phones, there are still many reasons someone might want to own a standalone portable music player. Models range from around $1 to more than $3,000, for what is already a niche market, the world of dedicated MP3 players is fragmented into various sub-niches targeting wildly different shoppers.

    By Mark Turner on

  • How to Play Long Video Games When You Have No Time

    For a lot of gamers with demanding jobs, marriages and/or families, the excitement of reading good reviews for games like Red Dead Redemption 2 and Assassin's Creed Odyssey is tempered by the sinking realization that they'll never have time to play them. How do you make time for a 60+ hour game when you have a busy life?

    By Keza MacDonald on

  • How We Test: CPU Gaming Benchmarks

    This a topic that's often raised when we do our CPU gaming benchmarks. As you know, we perform a ton of CPU and GPU benchmarks tests throughout the year, a big portion of which are dedicated to gaming. The goal is to work out which CPU will offer you the most bang for your buck at a given price point, now and hopefully in the future.

    By Steven Walton on

  • Game Streaming Investigation: Which Quality Settings Are Best?

    In the next weeks we'll dedicate a couple of articles to game streaming and provide you with a definitive answer on what sort of setup is the best, and what quality settings make the most sense to use. Today's investigation is focused on streaming quality settings.

    By Tim Schiesser on

  • Improve Windows Start Menu's Search or Simply Install a Better Replacement

    Although the Start menu is supposed to be the fastest way to find local files, software and settings, Windows 10's search indexing service is far from the best. It is not uncommon that a simple query won't return any valid results, no matter how simple or precise your query is. Here's how you can turn things around.

    By Mark Turner on