Feature Index Page 7

  • 10 Features Android Wear Should Have

    I've been using Android Wear on a daily basis over the last month and found that I love receiving notifications directly on my wrist, or being able to quicly voice search stuff on the web. But beyond that and displaying the time Google's smartwatch platform really can't do much in these early stages. Here's ten features that should be included in the next generation of Android Wear, most of which don't even require hardware updates.

    By Tim Schiesser on

  • The People Who Only Play One Video Game

    The video games that serve us. Video games are changing. Increasingly, we're seeing a subset of players focus their attention on one single video game instead of many. League of Legends, World of Tanks. Games that change. Games that are constantly evolving. Games that shift and transform according to the needs of their user base.

    By Mark Serrels on

  • Then and Now: 5 Generations of Radeon Graphics Compared

    After taking half a decade's worth of DirectX 11-capable GeForce graphics cards, it's time to look at things from the opposite side as we compare five generations of Radeon cards with the latest Catalyst driver to see when and where AMD has made its biggest performance leaps and which GPUs have aged the best.

    By Steven Walton on

  • The Best Skyrim Mods

    Skyrim was released over three years ago! In video game terms it's a senior citizen, and by all rights should be long gone. But it's still insanely popular, in large part down to the variety of mods available for it. If you've been out of the Skyrim loop for a year or two or have just got around to picking it up in a sale, here are the best mods for the game.

    By Luke Plunkett on

  • 10 Mobile Tech Predictions for 2015

    Twenty-fourteen saw mobile displays go above 1080p, ubiquitous LTE, lots of affordable devices, and more. As we now head in to 2015, it's time to make another ten predictions for what we might see in mobile computing throughout the year. Is the market set for a slowdown or will we see further noteworthy advancements?

    By Tim Schiesser on

  • The Year in Tech: 2014 Top Stories

    As the year comes to a close it's time to take a look back at some of the events that shaped the tech landscape in twenty-fourteen. There were some high profile buyouts, buzzwords, and a fair share of disruptions, controversies and security disasters with the likes of Apple, Google, Uber, Sony and the NSA -- among others -- as protagonists. This is a quick recount of the most relevant stories of 2014, divided into eleven different categories.

    By TechSpot Staff on

  • Then and Now: 5 Generations of GeForce Graphics Compared

    When new GPUs arrive we usually compare them to their predecessor but rarely go back more than one generation. Many of you who haven't upgraded GPUs in over a year, two, or more may be pleased to see how performance scales and what to expect in modern games.

    By Steven Walton on

  • AMD FX-8350 and FX-6300 Power to Performance Overclocking Test

    Intel has been beating AMD on every front but price for a couple of generations now as the Bulldozer microarchitecture and its descendants have had an unpleasant uphill climb. Power consumption, performance per clock, it all takes its toll. However, we took a couple of AMD's most popular chips for a test drive and found that things aren't anywhere near as bad as benchmarks might lead you to believe. Quite the opposite, actually.

    By Dustin Sklavos on

  • Impact of Temperature on Intel CPU Performance

    Older CPUs would simply fail if they started to overheat, but modern CPUs adjust their frequency based on temperature (among other things) to prevent a dramatic failure. Because of this, it stands to reason that once you reach certain temps, you will no longer be getting the maximum performance from your CPU because it will be busy protecting itself. But what is that temperature? And do you really need a high-end liquid-cooled system to get peak performance?

    By Matt Bach on

  • It's Time to Reinvent the Digital Pen

    For the pen to ever have mainstream adoption, it should be used consistently no matter where you are, like the mouse or keyboard. Ideally, you should be able to write, draw and mark-up with the pen everywhere. The pen doesn't ever need to be a mouse replacement.

    By Jeffrey Yuwono on

  • The Best Tech Deals and Discounts for Students

    Getting the most out of each dollar is absolutely critical for many students working towards a four-year college degree, but what most don't realize is that their college education can start paying dividends even before they step on campus. To help the millions of broke college students out, we've compiled a list of some of the top tech-related discounts from a variety of vendors, for anyone enrolled at an institution of higher education.

    By Shawn Knight on

  • The 12 Best Games on PC

    PC gamers have got a pretty great thing going. Interesting, experimental indie games? Yup. The shiniest, most visually impressive versions of big-budget games? Yeah, they get a lot of those, too. Let's say you've recently joined the ranks of the PC elite. What games should you install? Well, you can start out with the games listed on this roundup.

    By Kotaku Staff on

  • The Best Graphics Cards: Nvidia vs. AMD at Every Price Point

    It's been an eventful year for GPU releases with updated models and prices across all budgets from both AMD and Nvidia. With no more releases from either camp for the remainder of the year the competition will likely center on price. That's exciting news for those of you who have a shiny new GPU at the top of your Christmas list. Let's break down each price bracket to determine which company offers the best value product.

    By Steven Walton on

  • I Played 3 Hours of Dragon Age: Inquisition and It's Awesome

    Dragon Age: Inquisition is third main title in BioWare's action RPG series, and it's a much more expansive and ambitious game than those that came before it. The graphical detail on Ultra settings is jaw-dropping: from the particle effects, to lighting and textures... it is easily the most visually astounding RPG game I have ever played.

    By Tim Schiesser on

  • The Best Android Phones of 2014

    Throughout the year I have reviewed and had hands-on time with a large number of smartphones, especially from the Android camp, simply because there's such a sheer volume of them on the market today. I've used all the flagships from HTC, Samsung, LG, Motorola, Sony and more. These are some of my thoughts on the best that's out there.

    By Tim Schiesser on

  • What If Microsoft Had Released an "Officebook" Instead of the Surface RT

    What if Microsoft had just branded the Surface as an Office-dedicated device? Let's call it the Microsoft 'Officebook'. It's the thinnest and lightest portable computer for full Office. It's not a device for tech geeks; it's a device for the average consumer with simple requirements, and Office.

    By Jeffrey Yuwono on

  • Secure Email and Cloud Alternatives to Gmail and Dropbox

    Users are increasingly turning to services that claim to be secure from the prying eyes of the NSA and law enforcement. In this article, we take a look at some of the privacy-focused email and cloud storage services that have either sprung up or gained popularity in the wake of what's popularly been referred to as the Summer of Snowden.

    By Himanshu Arora on

  • History of the Microprocessor and the Personal Computer, Part 5

    The personal computing business as we know it owes itself to an environment of enthusiasts, entrepreneurs and happenstance. The invention of the microprocessor, DRAM, and EPROM integrated circuits would help bring computing to the mainstream. This is the fifth and last installment in a series exploring the history of the microprocessor and personal computing, from the invention of the transistor to modern day chips powering our connected devices.

    By Graham Singer on

  • History of the Microprocessor and the Personal Computer, Part 4

    The personal computing business as we know it owes itself to an environment of enthusiasts, entrepreneurs and happenstance. The invention of the microprocessor, DRAM, and EPROM integrated circuits would help bring computing to the mainstream. This is the fourth installment in a five-part series exploring the history of the microprocessor and personal computing, from the invention of the transistor to modern day chips powering our connected devices.

    By Graham Singer on

  • What TechSpot Writers Want in Windows 10

    We asked TechSpot's staff what they thought of the Windows 10 announcement and what changes they would like to see on Microsoft's new OS iteration.

    By TechSpot Staff on

  • History of the Microprocessor and the Personal Computer, Part 3

    The personal computing business as we know it owes itself to an environment of enthusiasts, entrepreneurs and happenstance. The invention of the microprocessor, DRAM, and EPROM integrated circuits would help bring computing to the mainstream. This is the third in a five-part series exploring the history of the microprocessor and personal computing, from the invention of the transistor to modern day chips powering our connected devices.

    By Graham Singer on

  • Switching Away From Outlook or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Gmail

    Today I'll refer to how I recently set up my email accounts for best efficiency leveraging one service you probably already use: Gmail, but in a specific context. To combat spam and unify my inboxes everywhere.

    By Jeffrey Yuwono on

  • History of the Microprocessor and the Personal Computer, Part 2

    The personal computing business as we know it owes itself to an environment of enthusiasts, entrepreneurs and happenstance. The invention of the microprocessor, DRAM, and EPROM integrated circuits would help bring computing to the mainstream. This is the second in a five-part series exploring the history of the microprocessor and personal computing, from the invention of the transistor to modern day chips powering our connected devices.

    By Graham Singer on

  • 10 Tips for Good Smartphone Photography

    While it's interesting to know and understand what constitutes a digital camera module, that won't help much when it comes to actually taking a photo on your smartphone. From a photography enthusiast and mobile hardware reviewer, here are 10 tips to take awesome shots using your smartphone.

    By Tim Schiesser on

  • Microsoft/Minecraft: How much did Redmond overpay?

    The press is speculating that Microsoft is acquiring Minecraft so it can "tap into a cultural phenomenon" and entice players to Microsoft's platforms. I don't buy either explanation.

    By Jeffrey Yuwono on

  • The History of the Microprocessor and the Personal Computer

    The personal computing business as we know it owes itself to an environment of enthusiasts, entrepreneurs and happenstance. The invention of the microprocessor, DRAM, and EPROM integrated circuits would help bring computing to the mainstream. This is the first in a five-part series exploring the history of the microprocessor and personal computing, from the invention of the transistor to modern day chips powering our connected devices.

    By Graham Singer on

  • The iPhone 6 Is DOA and the iPhone 6 Plus Is the Killer

    I don't even know why Apple bothered with the iPhone 6, because it will go the way of the iPhone 5C: a niche product; a consolation prize; the budget choice for Apple loyalists; something you get begrudgingly and regret later.

    By Jeffrey Yuwono on

  • Apple and Google Tablets Moving to Microsoft Territory

    The common refrain has been that tablets are for consumption and that laptops are for productivity, and never the twain shall meet. But it's a different world today, and now Apple and Google want to cross that bridge, too, into Microsoft territory. Apple with the iPad Pro, and Google with the new Nexus.

    By Jeffrey Yuwono on

  • 5 Free Image Editing Solutions Worth a Look

    Adobe Photoshop has long been the gold standard for image editing among professionals and photo enthusiasts. But for the average user who just wants to touch up the occasional photo, it can be hard to justify the cost and it probably does more way than you really need or care to do. There are plenty of free alternatives and we've rounded out our picks.

    By Erik Orejuela on

  • Soon No One Will Care About a Phone's Battery Life

    The fear of running out of battery wields such an extraordinary influence over how we use smartphones. We are never too far from a charger, and many of us carry a heavy, cumbersome power bank. I have good news: we are on the verge of true all day battery life.

    By Jeffrey Yuwono on