California lawmakers vowed to crack down on “revenge porn” and now nearly a year and a half later, they’re keeping that promise by convicting the first of what’ll no doubt be multiple offenders under the new law.

A Los Angeles man has been sentenced to a year behind bars for allegedly posting a topless photo of his ex-girlfriend on her employer’s Facebook page in March of 2014. Such malicious behavior is in violation of Facebook’s terms of service but it’s the California law that’s landing him in jail.

A jury found Iniguez guilty of two restraining order violations in addition to the revenge porn law. The jury came to its decision after deliberating for seven days.

The man, 36-year-old Noe Iniguez, was additionally sentenced to 36 months’ probation and ordered to attend domestic violence counseling and steer clear of the victim.

The measure to fight revenge porn was first proposed in August of last year before being signed into law in October. It was initially limited to photos taken by someone else although a revision this past August extended its reach to include selfies.

Revenge porn, for those uninitiated, is a term used to describe the act of posting images or videos online of someone else that are sexual in nature without their consent. As the name suggests, it’s often done as a way to “get back” at a former mate.