Most game publishers have come to accept, and even embrace creators that produce content for their games, regardless of the format (whether it be let's plays, reviews, or speedruns).

However, some companies have remained particularly stubborn in the face of all this new media. Nintendo, in particular, is notorious for slapping even the largest creators on YouTube with copyright strikes and Content ID claims when footage of its games is featured in a video.

The only way for creators to publish content without upsetting Nintendo's lawyers thus far has been to join the Nintendo Creators Program.

The program does allow creators to produce videos with footage from Nintendo's games, but it subjects them to several restrictive content guidelines and funnels 30 percent of a given video's ad revenue into the company's pockets.

...the Nintendo Creators Program is finally being shut down and replaced with a much less restrictive set of "basic rules" for Nintendo content creators to follow.

Fortunately for uploaders, the Nintendo Creators Program is finally being shut down and replaced with a much less restrictive set of "basic rules" for Nintendo content creators to follow. In short, the rules state that Nintendo will "not object" to the monetization or publication of videos containing "creative input and commentary" of some form.

This new ruleset still isn't ideal -- as Ars Technica notes, commentary-free "long plays" are still at risk -- but it's a massive step forward for creators nonetheless.

More importantly, it demonstrates a significant change in the way Nintendo thinks about content created for its games. It seems that, much like other publishers, the entertainment giant is starting to accept that such videos are effectively free advertising and not something to be threatened by.