1. TechSpot is dedicated to computer enthusiasts and power users. Ask a question and give support. Join the community here.
    TechSpot is dedicated to computer enthusiasts and power users.
    Ask a question and give support.
    Join the community here, it only takes a minute.
    Dismiss Notice

Amazon patent details delivery drone that responds to human gestures

By Shawn Knight · 4 replies
Mar 22, 2018
Post New Reply
  1. Amazon’s plans to use aerial drones to deliver packages are advancing. The e-commerce titan this week was granted a patent for a delivery drone capable of detecting verbal or physical gestures from humans and responding accordingly.

    An illustration accompanying the patent, originally filed in July 2016 but marked as a continuation of an application first submitted in 2014, shows a man waving his arms as a drone seemingly approaches a home. The drawing is accompanied by a blank speech bubble, suggesting the man is barking commands at the drone overhead.

    The patent was first spotted by GeekWire. In its description, Amazon mentions that a human could wave their arms in a “shooing” manner which would tell the drone that it should not proceed along its current path. A person waving their arms in an “inviting” manner, however, could be interpreted as an instruction to land and deliver the payload.

    DJI and Samsung have also developed human-detecting drone products.

    Amazon says the UAV could be laden with sensors. Examples listed include a depth sensor, a visible light camera, infrared camera and ultraviolet sensitive cameras for input and things like speakers, microphones and laser projectors for outbound communications.

    As always, keep in mind that this is just a patent and comes with no guarantee that Amazon will ever implement the technology in a consumer or commercial product. It’s also just one of many patents that Amazon has filed for in recent memory.

    Drone delivery is an area of intense interest for Amazon. The concept was first announced publicly by CEO Jeff Bezos in 2013 but has yet to take flight in an official capacity due to technological hurdles and an uncertain regulatory environment.

    Permalink to story.

     
  2. TomSEA

    TomSEA TechSpot Chancellor Posts: 3,093   +1,543

    They've been testing these things where I work in rural Washington State. They're not ready for prime-time yet. Lots of crashes from what I understand.
     
  3. Uncle Al

    Uncle Al TS Evangelist Posts: 5,142   +3,564

    They will probably be a lot like the autonomous vehicles and continue to improve as time goes on. I watched the old DARPA competition again today; it is amazing how much they have advanced and will continue to be more and more refined. I'm still curious how they will get around that 400' limit when going from one delivery to the next. Out in the country there are quite a few fellows that would consider that just sophisticated skeet & trap targets and if they fly under the limit, they are fair game .......
     
  4. hqxt1964

    hqxt1964 TS Enthusiast Posts: 57   +17

    Taobao USES drones to deliver packages of limited weight to the poorest "cliff village" in China's sichuan province, which is 1,000 metres down.
     
  5. Catweazle

    Catweazle TS Enthusiast Posts: 54   +37

    "A person waving their arms in an “inviting” manner, however, could be interpreted as an instruction to land and deliver the payload."

    First there were porch pirates, now there will be air pirates.
     

Add your comment to this article

You need to be a member to leave a comment. Join thousands of tech enthusiasts and participate.
TechSpot Account You may also...