Apple responds to criticism over iPhone's third-party battery replacement controversy

Humza

Posts: 944   +167
Staff member

"Unable to verify this iPhone has a genuine Apple battery. Health information not available for this battery," says the message under Battery Health if your latest iPhone detects a third-party battery replacement or even a genuine battery from another iPhone if the operation wasn't done by an Apple approved technician.

Although such iPhones can still be used, the disabling of Battery Health data has been seen as an effort from Apple to clamp down on independent battery replacements and discourage customers from going down the low-cost, and depending upon your location, a more convenient route.

The move has once again brought criticism over Apple's strict policies and control over its products that are increasingly seen as anti-consumer. Responding to the public reaction, a spokesperson for the company recently spoke to The Verge about why Apple took this decision. "We take the safety of our customers very seriously and want to make sure any battery replacement is done properly,” adding that for customer convenience, there were now over 1,800 Apple authorized service providers across the US.

The new feature, says the spokesperson, was introduced last year "to notify customers if we were unable to verify that a new, genuine battery was installed by a certified technician following Apple repair processes. This information is there to help protect our customers from damaged, poor quality, or used batteries which can lead to safety or performance issues. This notification does not impact the customer’s ability to use the phone after an unauthorized repair."

While a customer's inability to view Battery Health information including Maximum Capacity and Peak Performance Capability is likely frustrating, Apple's stance on the issue is that it can't guarantee accuracy of such battery replacements and the micro-controller further ensures that even genuine batteries installed by independent repair shops (or your technician/hobbyist friend) are unable to verify unless customers go where Apple explicitly says they should.

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IAMTHESTIG

Posts: 1,868   +900
Maybe Apple should stop putting crap batteries in their phones... I had three Motorola and one Samsung smartphone before switching to Apple and I never had battery issues with them - and I ran on them longer than I've ran on my iPhone which started crapping out not even two years in. I also had an inexplicable issue with my power/sleep button on my iPhone which just started getting "stuck", though it wasn't physically stuck.

While their hardware sure looks and feels nice, the quality of the internal components leaves a lot to be desired.
 

Bullwinkle M

Posts: 624   +500
"This information is there to help protect our customers from damaged, poor quality, or used batteries which can lead to safety or performance issues."
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

If that were true, then it should correctly indicate battery condition to protect your customers and it DOESN'T

FIX IT!
 

Rock Dirty

Posts: 55   +85
"does not impact the customer’s ability to use the phone after an unauthorized repair'

There is NO SUCH THING AS A "unauthorized repair". This is the root of the problem. Apple (and other companies) have added a new tier onto repairs "authorized", this has not existed prior to recent history. When you take your car to mechanic do you worry about this mechanic being "authorized" or not?

This needs to stop now, otherwise companies will just repairs another revenue stream (just as Apple has). And eventually they could block ANY repairs not made by someone who is "authorized"

This would be bad.
 

Polycount

Posts: 2,957   +589
Staff member
"does not impact the customer’s ability to use the phone after an unauthorized repair'

There is NO SUCH THING AS A "unauthorized repair". This is the root of the problem. Apple (and other companies) have added a new tier onto repairs "authorized", this has not existed prior to recent history. When you take your car to mechanic do you worry about this mechanic being "authorized" or not?

This needs to stop now, otherwise companies will just repairs another revenue stream (just as Apple has). And eventually they could block ANY repairs not made by someone who is "authorized"

This would be bad.
Good point and well said.

By making a distinction between "authorized" and unauthorized repairs, Apple is making it seem like there's something wrong with not going directly to them -- even if they won't actually repair your device half the time anyway, and instead push you to buy a new one or get pricey board replacement.
 

DCOCA

Posts: 10   +6
"does not impact the customer’s ability to use the phone after an unauthorized repair'

There is NO SUCH THING AS A "unauthorized repair". This is the root of the problem. Apple (and other companies) have added a new tier onto repairs "authorized", this has not existed prior to recent history. When you take your car to mechanic do you worry about this mechanic being "authorized" or not?

This needs to stop now, otherwise companies will just repairs another revenue stream (just as Apple has). And eventually they could block ANY repairs not made by someone who is "authorized"

This would be bad.
Good point and well said.

By making a distinction between "authorized" and unauthorized repairs, Apple is making it seem like there's something wrong with not going directly to them -- even if they won't actually repair your device half the time anyway, and instead push you to buy a new one or get pricey board replacement.

I 100 percent agree with your thoughts , but just to throw in some conversation, you could say that "licensed" and "authorized" have similar meaning; in Canada, and I am sure in most Western Countries, you do have to be licensed to be a mechanic, or electrician. So, what Apple is indicating is that you need to go to one of their licensed repair facility to fix one of their devices...
 
D

DelJo63

Very emotional issue. IMO, the automobile repair business is the standard on this question. As long as all the maintenance is performed by a trained, certified technician, the consumer should be able to pick the repair station.

As long as the parts used meet the OEM specs, parts should also be a non-issue.