DJI reportedly acquires majority stake in iconic camera company Hasselblad

Shawn Knight

TechSpot Staff
Staff member

DJI, perhaps the most prominent consumer drone maker in the industry, has reportedly purchased a majority stake in Swedish camera and photography company Hasselblad.

News of the acquisition was first reported by Luminous Landscape with multiple industry sources verifying the deal with TechCrunch. The insiders note that it’s not a full-on buyout but rather, DJI purchased a majority stake in the company.

DJI bought a minority stake in the iconic Swedish camera company back in 2015 for an undisclosed sum. That deal reportedly earned DJI a seat on Hasselblad’s board of directors.

When asked for comment regarding the majority stake purchase, DJI told The Verge that they have no further news about their partnership with Hasselblad. The spokesperson added that they will continue to work together to “push forward world-class imaging to creators around the world.”

Readers of a certain age may remember Hasselblad as one of the world’s most advanced camera manufacturers. Founded in 1941, Hasselblad’s cameras have a rich history as they were used to capture the image on the cover of the Beatles’ Abbey Road album, the famous black and white portrait of Steve Jobs holding his chin and many of NASA’s’ most iconic space photos.

It’ll be interesting to see exactly what DJI does with Hasselblad moving forward. The obvious answer is to somehow integrate its imaging technology into future drones but I digress.

Image courtesy Luminous Landscape

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Uncle Al

TS Evangelist
As one of many owners of a Hassie, I continue to marvel today at the image clarity of their glass and the dependability of their equipment. I still use my old 500 CM on a weekly basis and while my eyes are not as sharp as they once were, the old Hassie continues to produce sharp, crisp images. While they have moved to digital and no longer make a film camera, the quality continues but when you look at the price point, I seriously doubt they will be part of any but the most expensive drones. We can only hope they don't hope for strickly name appeal and let the quality spill out .....
 

mbrowne5061

TS Evangelist
As one of many owners of a Hassie, I continue to marvel today at the image clarity of their glass and the dependability of their equipment. I still use my old 500 CM on a weekly basis and while my eyes are not as sharp as they once were, the old Hassie continues to produce sharp, crisp images. While they have moved to digital and no longer make a film camera, the quality continues but when you look at the price point, I seriously doubt they will be part of any but the most expensive drones. We can only hope they don't hope for strickly name appeal and let the quality spill out .....
I doubt it will be a strict 'brand grab', or I would like doubt it. Hasselblad, as a brand, doesn't hold as much weight with the younger generations (X and Y). Photographers know what they are capable of, but even then, a majority still grab a Nikon or Canon first - if only because the glass for them is easier to find.

I suspect DJI wants access to Hasselblad's optics technology, and they'll largely leave the company alone. However, this still concerns me. The Chinese have never really had good lenses - judging by just how much security clearances are around even optics trade shows, and how they seem to be defending against Chinese spying based on the questioning that takes place. DJI getting a hold of Hasselblad's lens tech would solve this issue.
 
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