FidelityFX Super Resolution is AMD's answer to Nvidia's DLSS, set to debut this year

hahahanoobs

Posts: 3,263   +1,420
I know what that is, it's literally a term for freesync so uneducated Geforce owners know that their card will with VRR on the monitor.
It's far more than that. Nvidia inspects each of those monitors before getting the gsync label. One requirement is they must be able to do 48Hz to max refresh. Freesync has no such requirement....
 

hahahanoobs

Posts: 3,263   +1,420
Not single "Freesync only" monitor meets criteria for G-Sync because G-Sync needs extra hardware.

Then again, G-Sync compatible is same as adaptive sync that is same as Freesync. No matter if Nvidia certifies all Freesync monitors as G-Sync compatible or not, we are talking about same thing.
Freesync is a mess.
Freesync.
Freesync 2
Freesync Premium.
If it's "open" why so many names? Why the confusion? I still don't know the diff between them all. Freesync 2 died on the operating table was the last I heard about that.

Meanwhile, gsync compat monitors have stickers front and center to let you know it's adaptive sync for gamers. There is such Freesync branding. It's not even mentioned on websites until you scroll down in most cases to the specifications section, but gsync is front and center on the product page. No scrolling down necessary.

Nvidia cares enough to only approve monitors and brands Nvidia are comfortable enough to let use their branding. When I see that gsync sticker it lets me know Nvidia tested and approved it and I know what features it is supposed to have - like VRR range, which is the same for every monitor.

Def not the same....
 

HardReset

Posts: 1,022   +616
Freesync is a mess.
Freesync.
Freesync 2
Freesync Premium.
If it's "open" why so many names? Why the confusion? I still don't know the diff between them all. Freesync 2 died on the operating table was the last I heard about that.

Meanwhile, gsync compat monitors have stickers front and center to let you know it's adaptive sync for gamers. There is such Freesync branding. It's not even mentioned on websites until you scroll down in most cases to the specifications section, but gsync is front and center on the product page. No scrolling down necessary.

Nvidia cares enough to only approve monitors and brands Nvidia are comfortable enough to let use their branding. When I see that gsync sticker it lets me know Nvidia tested and approved it and I know what features it is supposed to have - like VRR range, which is the same for every monitor.

Def not the same....
G-Sync compatible means same thing as Freesync: support for VESA adaptive sync.

Nvidia made mess of this. First, they refused to support Adaptive sync. And when they finally did it, they branded it G-Sync compatible that is very different than G-Sync. Only "compatible" word makes difference between adaptive sync and G-Sync. That sucks.

Nvidia was late in party. Technologies like Freesync MUST be very easy to adopt, otherwise they vanish. Freesync specs were lousy at first but hey, any kind of adaptive sync is better than nothing. Basically Nvidia refuses to support "not good enough" Adaptive sync, because it's not good enough. But again, no matter how bad adaptive sync is, it's still better than no adaptive sync at all. Congratulations for those who bought Freesync monitor and have Nvidia GPU with no G-Sync compatible support. Sometimes I really wonder who actually buys Nvidia hardware...
 

hahahanoobs

Posts: 3,263   +1,420
G-Sync compatible means same thing as Freesync: support for VESA adaptive sync.

Nvidia made mess of this. First, they refused to support Adaptive sync. And when they finally did it, they branded it G-Sync compatible that is very different than G-Sync. Only "compatible" word makes difference between adaptive sync and G-Sync. That sucks.

Nvidia was late in party. Technologies like Freesync MUST be very easy to adopt, otherwise they vanish. Freesync specs were lousy at first but hey, any kind of adaptive sync is better than nothing. Basically Nvidia refuses to support "not good enough" Adaptive sync, because it's not good enough. But again, no matter how bad adaptive sync is, it's still better than no adaptive sync at all. Congratulations for those who bought Freesync monitor and have Nvidia GPU with no G-Sync compatible support. Sometimes I really wonder who actually buys Nvidia hardware...
Sigh...
G-Sync compatible means same thing as Freesync: support for VESA adaptive sync.

Another instance where AMD "innovates" and someone comes along and does it better!
 

Avro Arrow

Posts: 981   +1,125
TechSpot Elite
I'm honestly still wondering if the hardware-based upscaling of 4K TVs makes these technologies obsolete except for high-refresh gaming because no matter what resolution I set my game to, my TV upsamples it to full screen and it looks just as good as if I had set the game to 2160p except that my GPU doesn't take the performance hit.

I think that this is something that Steve or Tim might be interested to look into. It would definitely be something different from what all the other TechTubers are doing.

After all, even today, there is a dearth of content that is shot in 2160p so the TVs have to be able to upscale 1080p without appearing pixellated or blurry. They have to make a sharp 1080p image into a sharp 2160p image on the fly. Isn't that exactly what DLSS and FidelityFX are doing?

Techradar talks about it here:
4K upscaling: everything you need to know about how TVs turn HD into 4K
 
Last edited:

NeoMorpheus

Posts: 361   +645
Sigh...
G-Sync compatible means same thing as Freesync: support for VESA adaptive sync.

Another instance where AMD "innovates" and someone comes along and does it better!

"
The original FreeSync is based over DisplayPort 1.2a, using an optional feature VESA terms Adaptive-Sync.[5] This feature was in turn ported by AMD from a Panel-Self-Refresh (PSR) feature from Embedded DisplayPort 1.0,[6] which allows panels to control its own refreshing intended for power-saving on laptops.[7] AMD FreeSync is therefore a hardware–software solution that uses publicly-available protocols to enable smooth, tearing-free and low-latency gameplay.

FreeSync has also been implemented over HDMI 1.2+ as a protocol extension. HDMI 2.1+ has its own variable refresh rate system.[8]"

So what if its based on that?

What matters is that it does the same and its cheaper and an open standard....
 

Avro Arrow

Posts: 981   +1,125
TechSpot Elite

"
The original FreeSync is based over DisplayPort 1.2a, using an optional feature VESA terms Adaptive-Sync.[5] This feature was in turn ported by AMD from a Panel-Self-Refresh (PSR) feature from Embedded DisplayPort 1.0,[6] which allows panels to control its own refreshing intended for power-saving on laptops.[7] AMD FreeSync is therefore a hardware–software solution that uses publicly-available protocols to enable smooth, tearing-free and low-latency gameplay.

FreeSync has also been implemented over HDMI 1.2+ as a protocol extension. HDMI 2.1+ has its own variable refresh rate system.[8]"

So what if its based on that?

What matters is that it does the same and its cheaper and an open standard....
People who love nVidia don't love open standards. Open standards don't let them feel "special" enough if everyone else has it too. The ironic thing is that open hardware standards are the whole reason that the PC universe exists to begin with.
 

NeoMorpheus

Posts: 361   +645
People who love nVidia don't love open standards. Open standards don't let them feel "special" enough if everyone else has it too. The ironic thing is that open hardware standards are the whole reason that the PC universe exists to begin with.
Tell me about it. They are insane.
 

b3rdm4n

Posts: 12   +7
AMD really needs to deliver with this one, but it doesn't sound anywhere near ready, from the sounds of it they don't even know the approach they want to take yet.