Intel brings back "I'm a Mac" actor for M1-mocking commercials

captaincranky

Posts: 16,807   +5,582
It makes me wonder what funny video that Maddox will make this time. About fourteen years ago when those "I'm a Mac and I'm a PC" commercials were still kinda relevant, he did this hilarious parody of it (Yes, all these years later and I still remembered it well enough to find it immediately):
This video does a great job of showing just how stupid those commercials were then and whatever he comes up with will point out how stupid Intel's commercials are now.
Keep posting sh!t like that, and you'll have the far left wing of the 'thought police' hovering over your house in air cars.
 

auser2070

Posts: 8   +2
That's not quite how it goes.

The soldered on SSD necessitates a complete mobo replacement, which if it's out of warranty is something like $1K. But SSDs don't fail in Macs much and the rare times they do, it's early, under warranty. Most often it's damage done by the user - drops, water spills, etc. Frankly we don't see the Mac components fail, other than the ones that Apple failed to design properly in the first place and were forced to replace free under extended warranties: the butterfly keyboard, and a few screen issues (orange blotches).

FWIW, I have a number of 10+ year old Macs which still work, free hand me downs from upgraders and in retrospect the best thing Apple designed in the past 12 years wa
You are correct about that apple would replace the whole motherboard if the ssd were to fail. I still have a feeling that the new macs won’t last as long as the old ones. Maybe at best they will last 5-6 years. While the old ones live on.
 

auser2070

Posts: 8   +2
I don't think you can use your personal experience as evidence "most often it's damage done by the user" I have a Macbook pro I used every saturday to type of a report while I was eating breakfast at a restaurant. I never used that computer for anything else. Once Covid hit and that restaurant closed I only used that computer twice and the second time I look it out of its case to see if I remembered the password the right side of the touch bar, which I would have never selected if it was optional, no longer displayed anything. I took it to Apple and they told it it would cost $1500 to fix it and it would just be better if I bought a new laptop. I sent an email to a repair service and they told it would cost $350 to replace the module.

Apple designed many of these computer to run at 90-100 degrees celsius and Apple can and will refuse to fix a computer if it's been used in a humid environment which can set off the liquid sensors. Apple wasn't going to fix replace the touchbar with a new one they were just going to replace everything and I would have lost all my settings and data if it wasn't backed up.

"If people haven't dropped them, they still look and feel like brand new computers over a decade later." Nearly everything looks and feels like brand new if it's taken care of.
Well everyone has a personal preference.
All that anyone needs to know about Apple and their stance on Right-to-Repair can be found on Louis Rossmann's YouTube channel:
Thank you for letting me know about that
 

auser2070

Posts: 8   +2
I have several machines with SSDs in them, mostly PCs, and not a single SSD has failed. Some of them are 5+ years old. SSDs can and do fail but usually under heavy write loads.

You must really hate the new MS Surface. I've seen "tear-down" videos and you practically have to tear it apart to get it open.
I argee with what you have to say
 
I don't think you can use your personal experience as evidence "most often it's damage done by the user" I have a Macbook pro I used every saturday to type of a report while I was eating breakfast at a restaurant. I never used that computer for anything else. Once Covid hit and that restaurant closed I only used that computer twice and the second time I look it out of its case to see if I remembered the password the right side of the touch bar, which I would have never selected if it was optional, no longer displayed anything. I took it to Apple and they told it it would cost $1500 to fix it and it would just be better if I bought a new laptop. I sent an email to a repair service and they told it would cost $350 to replace the module.

Apple designed many of these computer to run at 90-100 degrees celsius and Apple can and will refuse to fix a computer if it's been used in a humid environment which can set off the liquid sensors. Apple wasn't going to fix replace the touchbar with a new one they were just going to replace everything and I would have lost all my settings and data if it wasn't backed up.

"If people haven't dropped them, they still look and feel like brand new computers over a decade later." Nearly everything looks and feels like brand new if it's taken care of.

I can offer my 10 years + experience as an IT Tech fixing PCs and Mac's on a regular basis. Most techs from the company I contract to don't want to touch the Mac's so I do see a lot more than most. I also build custom PC's when I’m not working for them.
In almost all circumstances I have found that Apple machines do last a long time, I regularly see clients with machines well over 5 years old still doing what they need them to do. I rarely see this from the better quality PC laptops they compete with. Yes, I have seen issues with specific year models from them, their 2016 MB Pro was an epic fail, their touch-bar to me was pointless and soldered on components made them very difficult to upgrade, out of warranty support and services are overpriced doo doo and I would never recommend using them for repair or parts replacement, but the same can also be said for other manufacturers. Thankfully we have some great 3rd party services and second-hand parts market ;)
Every manufacturer can and does refuse repair based on what they class misuse and over the year I have seen allot worse example of this from the other premium laptop manufacturers so this is not specific to Apple.
Their new SOC design M1 is surprisingly efficient, fast and the uptake of apps being ported to run natively is good news for early adopters and the platform going forward.
How long they last is unknown at this stage but I see these new ARM-based Mac's creating a completely different type of device that is as efficient as a mobile phone with the power of desktop CPU.
 

mark kram

Posts: 57   +14
I think I'll stick with my home built, 10 year old PC. It starts and runs just as fast as it did when it was new and the Corsair SSD hasn't degraded.