M-Discs: Stone-like optical discs that are nearly indestructible

Matthew

TS Evangelist
LG and Millenniata, a new startup, plan to launch a new storage format with optical discs that far exceed the average life expectancy of your average optical disc, hard drive,…

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Gars

TS Booster
Based on our understanding, you'll only have to buy a new M-Disc burner to write data.
only $2-3k i guess

anyway, it's unexpected to see such a major improvement in this area...
 
G

Guest

When CDs came out in the 80s they were supposed to be nearly indestructible too.....
 

treeski

TS Evangelist
How heavy will they be? =P
It would be nice if they were able to increase the disc capacity to at least blu-ray size. These days, data is getting bigger and bigger.
 

Richy2k9

TS Enthusiast
hello ...

really love the concept & wish to see it applied to blurays too :p

i really had a laugh with your comments ;) .. +thumbs ..

cheers!
 

ebolamonkey3

TS Rookie
Man, $3/ disk. I guess if they ever get big enough, it could be used to permanently backup stuff, but at 4.7gb/disc, too small :(
 

anguis

TS Enthusiast
so does this mean you can finally use the discs as a coaster while you arent using them in the computer? dual use!
 

mario

Ex-TS Developer
Physical media is dying, they will become a niche market for backups or other storage needs. Blu-ray has never taken off like CDs did and it never will, people buy more music online now than on physical media and I'm sure this trend will catch up with Movies, etc.
 
G

Guest

it will be a great way to archive 'home' or family data.. take a few m-disc's to the safety deposit box...
 

MilwaukeeMike

TS Evangelist
wait.... they have the same polycarbonate layer as a regular CD... so it won't degrade or snap in half, but it'll still pick up scratches then wouldn't it?

I'd much rather have a scratch proof disc.
 

The5Xfactor

TS Rookie
OK! Let's say I burn one of those 'super' disks with my Tax data on it.. then later, I decide to erase this data for safety reasons.. Now what should I do?
 

gwailo247

TechSpot Chancellor
the5xfactor said:
OK! Let's say I burn one of those 'super' disks with my Tax data on it.. then later, I decide to erase this data for safety reasons.. Now what should I do?
Bury it deep underground so our descendants will find it, and base their understanding of the economy of the early 21st century on your tax records.
 
G

Guest

mario
on August 9, 2011
1:46 PM ................."Physical media is dying"

Name a non physical media.
 
G

Guest

Forever. That would be a first for the universe as we know it.

BS off the port bow!
 

Archean

TechSpot Paladin
Physical media is dying, they will become a niche market for backups or other storage needs. Blu-ray has never taken off like CDs did and it never will, people buy more music online now than on physical media and I'm sure this trend will catch up with Movies, etc.
To some extent that is true with regard to ordinary users. But all that cloudy stuff is leading us towards a) a less open web, b) put corporations controlling them in charge of what you can and can't do.

I have lots of discussions on this subject and none of IT people I know are interested to place all of their company's data in the hands of other corporations. So at least in the short to medium term I think storage mediums will remain in demand for much of the businesses.
 

lopdog

TS Maniac
Sounds great with a disk that can't be destroyed, most DVD's have very limited lifetime, but shouldn't they try to make Blu-ray. Who would buy an expensive recorder with only 4.7Gb capacity? That's not very much nowadays.
 
G

Guest

that thing is good but others will try to stop it...its not good for business to create that kind of devices....so i think that we wont see this technology
 

captaincranky

TechSpot Addict
(Edit:CC "a burner would cost)...only $2-3k i guess

anyway, it's unexpected to see such a major improvement in this area...
You don't use a burner, just a hammer and chisel...:rolleyes: In this way, it's sort of a like tombstone for data; "here lies data, forever". Sort of brings a whole new dimension to the term, "RIP data", doesn't it?
 
G

Guest

You can still destroy them, you just have to physically, like in a CD shredder :) Although I bet it would take a realy strong one to do that...

This is oooollld though.. This technology came ages ago. One of my good friends new the guy who pioneered it and developed it at BYU, and they've been trying to sell the machines to my work for a few years now. Looks like they've sponsored some more tests and done some re-releases in hopes that it'll appear as something new :) Where I worked, though, nobody wanted to pay the premium (and I worked in digital archival helping people put their vhs tapes onto DVDs... we prided ourselves in using the premium 'Archival' quality DVDs)
 

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