Microsoft is killing off Windows 10 in 2025

captaincranky

Posts: 17,147   +5,911
I have W10 pro - assume most of us do . When I saw the screaming, wailing about how bad W10 GUI was etc . I thought it strange I had no problem using it from day 1 - I never understood their problem or inflexible coping .
I can imagine "you young whippersnappers" (?) didn't. I don't own, and have no need of a cell phone. Thus, I took one look at everything from Win 8 on, and dismissed it.
 

captaincranky

Posts: 17,147   +5,911
Oh I BET they will with the same reasons and whining they used for why people are holding on to windows 7, and windows xp, and windows 98, and windows 3.1, and Dos 6, and Dos 5, and Dos 3.3.. etc. etc.
Dude, monopolies don't just happen, they exist on a bed of greed, lies, and thievery. That's the only way you can get them, "off the ground", so to speak.

Of course, driving ambition to help people, and foresightedness, is what will be in the press release.
 
Forget Windows 11, fix Windows 10. On June 10th, the latest update W10 update was installed on my HP Envy 360 laptop. It looked fine. However, when I went to use Chrome, it crashed over and over. On June 11th, I took it to the Geek Squad. They removed Chrome 3 times and reinstalled it, no luck. Said I had two choices: use Edge or the "nuclear option" of wiping out my computer and starting over, which is throwing me into a state of panic and depression. Edge is an issue because it does not support several extensions I used in my business daily. I called HP Software Tech. After 4 hours, HP came to same conclusion and they gave me the same 2 options. Both told me they had many customers with a similar issue. HP tried to restore the computer back to before the update but it will not give me that option, so that is out.
Questions: Are others having this problem? What have you done about it? Am I stressing over a start-over more than I should be? Would you trust more the Geek Squad in-store or HP online tech to do a wipe-out and start over?
 

Todd Sauve

Posts: 39   +50
If Micro$oft doesn't give Windows 11 away like they did Windows 10, I think I'll just move over to LinuxMint. Windows 10 is getting so much flakier with every new update that I am having a hard time liking it anymore! 🙄🤦‍♂️🤷‍♂️🥴
 

Todd Sauve

Posts: 39   +50
Forget Windows 11, fix Windows 10. On June 10th, the latest update W10 update was installed on my HP Envy 360 laptop. It looked fine. However, when I went to use Chrome, it crashed over and over. On June 11th, I took it to the Geek Squad. They removed Chrome 3 times and reinstalled it, no luck. Said I had two choices: use Edge or the "nuclear option" of wiping out my computer and starting over, which is throwing me into a state of panic and depression. Edge is an issue because it does not support several extensions I used in my business daily. I called HP Software Tech. After 4 hours, HP came to same conclusion and they gave me the same 2 options. Both told me they had many customers with a similar issue. HP tried to restore the computer back to before the update but it will not give me that option, so that is out.
Questions: Are others having this problem? What have you done about it? Am I stressing over a start-over more than I should be? Would you trust more the Geek Squad in-store or HP online tech to do a wipe-out and start over?
If you are going to keep Windows 10 get a free copy of Macrium Reflect and set it to keep at least three consecutive days of backups. Then when MS drops their latest monkey-wrench into your PC's gears you have a really good rescue plan. I have never had Macrium Reflect let me down and I am so thankful they offer their free edition with scheduling and multiple days of backups.
 

Danny101

Posts: 1,820   +789
Enterprise 1809 LTSC will be supported until 2029, so for those who want a bloat-free, BS-free, Cortana-free, "feature update"-free OS that actually feels like an upgrade from W7, there's always that for another 8 years of sanity.

As for W11 I'm predicting : 1. More monthly "overly flat wall of whitespace" ugly UI redesigns, 2. The same "bi-polar" Control Panel vs Settings "App", 3. A push for unwanted modding-unfriendly UWP exclusives as the "new norm" (guess which store would disproportionately benefit from having games packaged as that by default vs other games stores (Steam, GOG, etc) that "only" sell "legacy" Win32/64 games...), 4. More telemetry, 5. More bloat, 6. More restrictions on what consumer Home / Pro users can disable without needing Group Policies, 7. They'll go for the "Hat Trick" in re-breaking printer drivers in another future update...
How do you get the LTSC? Besides, I'll probably be venturing into the world Linux as a daily driver and just keep Windows for gaming.
 

Aranarth

Posts: 115   +100
Dude, monopolies don't just happen, they exist on a bed of greed, lies, and thievery. That's the only way you can get them, "off the ground", so to speak.

Of course, driving ambition to help people, and foresightedness, is what will be in the press release.

While I agree I'm wondering what that has to do with a new version of Windows and my point that people have never liked what is new for M$ except for Windows 95 where the lined up around the block to get it.
 

captaincranky

Posts: 17,147   +5,911
While I agree I'm wondering what that has to do with a new version of Windows and my point that people have never liked what is new for M$ except for Windows 95 where the lined up around the block to get it.
I see you're of a mind to make me do a half page,explaining/debating your premise..

Between '95 and XP there were two "clunkers", and one decent OS, (I think", Windows 98, "millennium edition", & 2000. Up to this point, (if memory serves), people could copy and distribute Windows with relative impunity.

Then came XP with its "activation" protocols, and yes, people resented that, but quickly learned to love the OS itself.

Pretty much, Vista was a turd, not to mention it was basically a Windows 7 beta. People hated it, as perhaps they should. Programs such as Photoshop, and particularly PS Elements were confounded by it. That being the case, Vista had to invent "imaginary file paths", to accommodate it. (Keep in mind the street, inviolable price of Photoshop, was $600.00). However, Vista had native SATA (AHCI) drivers, which everybody glossed over or missed entirely. (We had an alleged, "pro" here, who at the time, were still claiming, "you had to set the drive mode to "IDE", if you wanted it to work).

Then came Window 7, which in truth is a face lift of Vista, but with, "value added goodies", particularly, "Windows Media Center:, which I along with the rest of the world's TV watching public, embraced wholeheartedly. It's price wasn't more than Vista, and people as you say "stood around the block to get it", if only to get our from under the steaming turd that was Vista. People caught on rather quickly, that what drivers were lacking in Win 7, could be appropriated from Vista, and in general they solved most, if not all lingering driver related issues.

The came Windows 8, a push button piece of sh!t which cost Steve Ballmer, his job.

Now we're in the "Satya Nadella era". Nadella is an obnoxious, pushy, a**hole, with the sales skills and tactics of a huckster in a New Delhi slum. The way he forced Windows 10 on the the public is unforgivable, and at least in my, "old person's set in his ways mind", he won't be forgiven for it, until I"m dead and in my grave, with a copy of Windows 7 in my hands, as though it were a bible.

As for all the hype about, "advanced security", if you really want to sell an OS, just use massive amounts of FUD and propaganda about "security" to do it.

And those of you are preoccupied with what Windows new Windows wallpaper and icons will look like, IMO, amuse as easily cat chasing a piece of string.
 
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Aranarth

Posts: 115   +100
I see you're of a mind to make me do a half page,explaining/debating your premise..

Between '95 and XP there were two "clunkers", and one decent OS, (I think", Windows 98, "millennium edition", & 2000. Up to this point, (if memory serves), people could copy and distribute Windows with relative impunity.

Then came XP with its "activation" protocols, and yes, people resented that, but quickly learned to love the OS itself.

Pretty much, Vista was a turd, not to mention it was basically a Windows 7 beta. People hated it, as perhaps they should. Programs such as Photoshop, and particularly PS Elements were confounded by it. That being the case, Vista had to invent "imaginary file paths", to accommodate it. (Keep in mind the street, inviolable price of Photoshop, was $600.00). However, Vista had native SATA (AHCI) drivers, which everybody glossed over or missed entirely. (We had an alleged, "pro" here, who at the time, were still claiming, "you had to set the drive mode to "IDE", if you wanted it to work).

Then came Window 7, which in truth is a face lift of Vista, but with, "value added goodies", particularly, "Windows Media Center:, which I along with the rest of the world's TV watching public, embraced wholeheartedly. It's price wasn't more than Vista, and people as you say "stood around the block to get it", if only to get our from under the steaming turd that was Vista. People caught on rather quickly, that what drivers were lacking in Win 7, could be appropriated from Vista, and in general they solved most, if not all lingering driver related issues.

The came Windows 8, a push button piece of sh!t which cost Steve Ballmer, his job.

Now we're in the "Satya Nadella era". Nadella is an obnoxious, pushy, a**hole, with the sales skills and tactics of a huckster in a New Delhi slum. The way he forced Windows 10 on the the public is unforgivable, and at least in my, "old person's set in his ways mind", he won't be forgiven for it, until I"m dead and in my grave, with a copy of Windows 7 in my hands, as though it were a bible.

As for all the hype about, "advanced security", if you really want to sell an OS, just use massive amounts of FUD and propaganda about "security" to do it.

And those of you are preoccupied with what Windows new Windows wallpaper and icons will look like, IMO, amuse as easily cat chasing a piece of string.
Actually windows 95 had to be activated or rather a code had to be entered which matched a algorithm included in the install. Windows 3.1 and earlier did not. If you were installing an upgrade they would check to make sure you had a valid previous version for Windows 3.1 upgrade and Dos 5 and 6 upgrades did the same. Windows 95 upgrade check could be over come by entering all zeros for the PID if you were doing a fresh install.

So while I agree mostly with everything you wrote. And what you wrote is mostly correct depending on your point of view, you still missed that my point is that people NUMBER ONE hate change and that is the BIGGEST reason why people complain about a new version of windows. Every single time.
 

captaincranky

Posts: 17,147   +5,911
So while I agree mostly with everything you wrote. And what you wrote is mostly correct depending on your point of view, you still missed that my point is that people NUMBER ONE hate change and that is the BIGGEST reason why people complain about a new version of windows. Every single time.
Vista's issues weren't primarily due to used "likes", or, "dislikes". It was due to the fact the permissions were beyond invasive and pervasive. Not to mention iy really wasn't much more than XP with SATA drivers, with my foregoing nuisances mentioned.

See for yourself about it's adoption statistics; (From Wiki)

"At the release of its successor, Windows 7 (October 2009), Windows Vista (with approximately 400 million Internet users) was the second most widely used operating system on the Internet with an approximately 19% market share, the most widely used being Windows XP with an approximately 63% market share.[15] In May 2010, Windows Vista's market share had an estimated range from 15% to 26%.[16][17] On October 22, 2010, Microsoft ceased sales of retail copies of Windows Vista, and the OEM sales for Vista ceased a year later.[18]

Official mainstream support for Vista ended on April 10, 2012,[19] extended support ended on April 11, 2017,[20] and a built-in time bomb that blocks Windows Update on Windows Vista versions newer than KB3205400 released in December 2016 displays a static icon with an information page link starting from April 12, 2017. As of May 2021, Vista's market share has declined to 0.25% of Windows' total market share.[21] The server equivalent, Windows Server 2008, received security updates until January 2020; unofficial methods were made available to apply these updates to Windows Vista".

XP was still the first version to adopt "hard core" activation protocols.

In an interesting "twist of fate", M$, "Flight Simulator 2004", includes "CD ROM Lock". You could rip the disc to an ISO file, burn it back to CD and install the program from that. It would install just fine from a disc burned from said ISO.

However, the damned program still wouldn't run, unless you put the original factory disc into your optical drive.

As for customers, "not liking change", M$ is doing everything possible to force that change on Win 7 users:

1: Discontinuing downloads of Windows VM ware, which allowed XP programs to run on 7.

2: Discontinuing support for Windows Media Center's "TV program Guide. (And discontinuing WMC altogether in stock Win 10 versions).

3: Bribing gamer types, because Windows 10, "wonder of wonders", has DX-12. IMO it could have been an update to Windows 7.

I'm sticking to my story that Satya Nadella is at least as dangerous in the field of the Windows OS, as Donald Trump was in the arena of politics.

I could go on about Indian business practices, which are far different from those in the US, and the rest of the western world, but I don't want this post yanked because of it. .
 

Danny101

Posts: 1,820   +789
Vista's issues weren't primarily due to used "likes", or, "dislikes". It was due to the fact the permissions were beyond invasive and pervasive. Not to mention iy really wasn't much more than XP with SATA drivers, with my foregoing nuisances mentioned.

See for yourself about it's adoption statistics; (From Wiki)

"At the release of its successor, Windows 7 (October 2009), Windows Vista (with approximately 400 million Internet users) was the second most widely used operating system on the Internet with an approximately 19% market share, the most widely used being Windows XP with an approximately 63% market share.[15] In May 2010, Windows Vista's market share had an estimated range from 15% to 26%.[16][17] On October 22, 2010, Microsoft ceased sales of retail copies of Windows Vista, and the OEM sales for Vista ceased a year later.[18]

Official mainstream support for Vista ended on April 10, 2012,[19] extended support ended on April 11, 2017,[20] and a built-in time bomb that blocks Windows Update on Windows Vista versions newer than KB3205400 released in December 2016 displays a static icon with an information page link starting from April 12, 2017. As of May 2021, Vista's market share has declined to 0.25% of Windows' total market share.[21] The server equivalent, Windows Server 2008, received security updates until January 2020; unofficial methods were made available to apply these updates to Windows Vista".

XP was still the first version to adopt "hard core" activation protocols.

In an interesting "twist of fate", M$, "Flight Simulator 2004", includes "CD ROM Lock". You could rip the disc to an ISO file, burn it back to CD and install the program from that. It would install just fine from a disc burned from said ISO.

However, the damned program still wouldn't run, unless you put the original factory disc into your optical drive.

As for customers, "not liking change", M$ is doing everything possible to force that change on Win 7 users:

1: Discontinuing downloads of Windows VM ware, which allowed XP programs to run on 7.

2: Discontinuing support for Windows Media Center's "TV program Guide. (And discontinuing WMC altogether in stock Win 10 versions).

3: Bribing gamer types, because Windows 10, "wonder of wonders", has DX-12. IMO it could have been an update to Windows 7.

I'm sticking to my story that Satya Nadella is at least as dangerous in the field of the Windows OS, as Donald Trump was in the arena of politics.

I could go on about Indian business practices, which are far different from those in the US, and the rest of the western world, but I don't want this post yanked because of it. .
Used Vista from 2009 through 2014. Didn't have a bit of problem and didn't use 7 but for maybe 6 months. Of course, I had dual and quad-core CPUs. Obviously, that was what Vista was designed for at the time.
 

captaincranky

Posts: 17,147   +5,911
Used Vista from 2009 through 2014. Didn't have a bit of problem and didn't use 7 but for maybe 6 months. Of course, I had dual and quad-core CPUs. Obviously, that was what Vista was designed for at the time.
Perhaps so. And you forgot to mention the ACHI drivers. I have Vista in a laptop I never use. It's sat on the >VCR< stack in my bedroom for at least a decade, on the charger. I never has an issue with the OS, other than the fact it "lacks personality". (No Windows Media Center, No desktop Slide show). That said, I'm not sure whether the step-up versions of Vista had either of those options. Win 7 did away with the basic home edition "option", (or rather lack thereof), set.

FWIW, Vista never gave me any trouble in that pre-built rig. It's just that the laptop sucks in general. It needs an SSD, since the boot time is horrendous. I keep meaning to put one in but....,truth be told, I'm lazy as hell, and I hardly, (going on never), use it. The single core Celeron might be a contributing factor in that regard. Oh yeah, and the TN screen too. That sucks big time.
 
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Danny101

Posts: 1,820   +789
Perhaps so. And you forgot to mention the ACHI drivers. I have Vista in a laptop I never use. It's sat on the >VCR< stack in my bedroom for at least a decade, on the charger. I never has an issue with the OS, other than the fact it "lacks personality". (No Windows Media Center, No desktop Slide show). That said, I'm not sure whether the step-up versions of Vista had either of those options. Win 7 did away with the basic home edition "option", (or rather lack thereof), set.

FWIW, Vista never gave me any trouble in that pre-built rig. It's just that the laptop sucks in general. It needs an SSD, since the boot time is horrendous. I keep meaning to put one in but....,truth be told, I'm lazy as hell, and I hardly, (going on never), use it. The single core Celeron might be a contributing factor in that regard. Oh yeah, and the TN screen too. That sucks big time.
Right. I actually had the Home Premium version of Vista. I forgot to mention that. It had the Windows Media Center. I was happy enough and didn't really know about all the fuss over Vista. My system couldn't run it at the time it dropped and had to do a new build anyway. When I did do a build, there's Vista and 7 hadn't dropped yet. Good or bad timing however one wants to look at it. By that time, they've must had worked out the kinks and it just worked. Thereby, I didn't feel pressed for 7. I an enthusiast for sure, but didn't really have my fingers on the pulse of tech as I've had in the past few years. Basically, when I wanted to be able to do something, I would search out whatever I needed to do that thing and went on about my business. I didn't start looking at Techspot until around 14' and didn't even had an account till later. I had things to say. And a few things I prolly shouldn't say.
 
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