My monitor flashes analog/hdmi for a few seconds and then goes black

Hello, I woke up and opened my computer, plugged it in but this happens (title). Tried looking for a cable defect but it seemed okay to me, im using hdmi for my monitor to my graphics card. I tried using my second monitor but still to no avail, no signal and blackscreen with this monitor I used VGA to DVI. Both are blackscreen even if I tried to use them separately.

The computer was working fine just yesterday.
 
Hello, I woke up and opened my computer, plugged it in but this happens (title). Tried looking for a cable defect but it seemed okay to me, im using hdmi for my monitor to my graphics card. I tried using my second monitor but still to no avail, no signal and blackscreen with this monitor I used VGA to DVI. Both are blackscreen even if I tried to use them separately.

The computer was working fine just yesterday.
This condition is called no: Power On Self Test (POST). When your computer first turns on, it goes through a very rapid check to make sure it has all the necessary components to POST. I find the number one reason a computer powers up but does not POST (and it was fine yesterday) is unseated RAM or a bad RAM stick. Try reseating the RAM and/or try 1 stick of RAM at a time to see if you can get it to POST.

The 2nd most common reason is a sudden power loss can corrupt the BIOS settings that also prevents POST. You can reset the BIOS if you follow the procedure outlined by your PC manufacturer or your PC's motherboard manufacturer (If it is a custom build). Sudden power loss can occur because of fluctuations in the wall voltage or a power supply that is on the way out.

Some motherboards or PCs have diagnostic debug lights on the motherboard or on the outside of the case to help you diagnose the problem. One of the original ways to tell you there was a problem was a series of beep codes using a BIOS speaker. I have noticed a lot of builds these days where there is a header on the motherboard for the BIOS speaker but it seems to be missing on a lot of builds I troubleshoot these days.
 
This condition is called no: Power On Self Test (POST). When your computer first turns on, it goes through a very rapid check to make sure it has all the necessary components to POST. I find the number one reason a computer powers up but does not POST (and it was fine yesterday) is unseated RAM or a bad RAM stick. Try reseating the RAM and/or try 1 stick of RAM at a time to see if you can get it to POST.

The 2nd most common reason is a sudden power loss can corrupt the BIOS settings that also prevents POST. You can reset the BIOS if you follow the procedure outlined by your PC manufacturer or your PC's motherboard manufacturer (If it is a custom build). Sudden power loss can occur because of fluctuations in the wall voltage or a power supply that is on the way out.

Some motherboards or PCs have diagnostic debug lights on the motherboard or on the outside of the case to help you diagnose the problem. One of the original ways to tell you there was a problem was a series of beep codes using a BIOS speaker. I have noticed a lot of builds these days where there is a header on the motherboard for the BIOS speaker but it seems to be missing on a lot of builds I troubleshoot these days.
Hello I tried the first step by using only one ram at a time and it worked. But when I powered down my computer and put the extra one ram it goes back to the analog screen again and doesn't boot up. Is there anyway that I can open my PC by using both of the ram?
 
This condition is called no: Power On Self Test (POST). When your computer first turns on, it goes through a very rapid check to make sure it has all the necessary components to POST. I find the number one reason a computer powers up but does not POST (and it was fine yesterday) is unseated RAM or a bad RAM stick. Try reseating the RAM and/or try 1 stick of RAM at a time to see if you can get it to POST.

The 2nd most common reason is a sudden power loss can corrupt the BIOS settings that also prevents POST. You can reset the BIOS if you follow the procedure outlined by your PC manufacturer or your PC's motherboard manufacturer (If it is a custom build). Sudden power loss can occur because of fluctuations in the wall voltage or a power supply that is on the way out.

Some motherboards or PCs have diagnostic debug lights on the motherboard or on the outside of the case to help you diagnose the problem. One of the original ways to tell you there was a problem was a series of beep codes using a BIOS speaker. I have noticed a lot of builds these days where there is a header on the motherboard for the BIOS speaker but it seems to be missing on a lot of builds I troubleshoot these days.
Update: My computer boots up now with 2 ram stick. I followed the second step by resetting my bios on my motherboard. I just followed some youtube reel by getting rid of the silver thing (bios) on my motherboard then press it for 3 seconds then I heard a beep. I then put the two ram sticks and it worked like magic. Thank you man. You're one of the treasures of the internet.
 
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