New algorithms could allow lithium-ion batteries to charge twice as fast

Shawn Knight

TechSpot Staff
Staff member
A new take on battery technology could mean that we'll soon be able to charge our device batteries twice as fast as what's possible today. Engineers at the University of California, San Diego have developed a new charging algorithm that...

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IAMTHESTIG

TS Evangelist
I thought rapid charging is bad for lithium based batteries, decreasing their capacity. A slow charger is better, from what I understand. So does this mean a battery could only last as little as only 6 months or so?
 

Greg S

TS Evangelist
I thought rapid charging is bad for lithium based batteries, decreasing their capacity. A slow charger is better, from what I understand. So does this mean a battery could only last as little as only 6 months or so?
No, this is charging faster without reducing life span. They are predicting where the uncharged particles are and essentially targeting only the uncharged particles with electricity instead of wasting time by have electricity flow more randomly throughout the battery.
 

treeski

TS Evangelist
This is cool, but really I'm waiting for some game-changing discovery in energy capacity. I want to be able to use a core i7 type machine for a week straight without needing a charge!!

...if only
 
G

Guest

Probably they know this from `90s but now they are aloud to do it.
 

Greg S

TS Evangelist
If an editor reads this, there is a bug with the comments. It says that the comments were made 3 months ago, should be hours ago.
 

Det

TS Enthusiast
No, this is charging faster without reducing life span. They are predicting where the uncharged particles are and essentially targeting only the uncharged particles with electricity instead of wasting time by have electricity flow more randomly throughout the battery.
Should improve it then?
 
G

Guest

This is great. One of the most important aspect that hasn't improved in par with the strides of recent mobile device hardware is the battery life.

Waiting for the day where we can charge once and use a smartphone for 1-2 weeks without recharging. That is imperative!
 
G

Guest

[SIZE=13px]"This is cool, but really I'm waiting for some game-changing discovery in energy capacity"[/SIZE]

[SIZE=13px]actually, we've found it, but still in research (still in prototype)[/SIZE]
 

Burty117

TechSpot Chancellor
Why test it in electric cars though? I would rather my Phone could last longer and I'm pretty sure if this kind of tech can get into phones first that would please a much bigger crowd than the few people who wasted money on an electric car.
 

KristoZ

TS Rookie
If an editor reads this, there is a bug with the comments. It says that the comments were made 3 months ago, should be hours ago.
Try and check your local computer's clock - I am not an editor, but the date and time counters change if you change your clock.
 

9Nails

TechSpot Paladin
Why test it in electric cars though? I would rather my Phone could last longer and I'm pretty sure if this kind of tech can get into phones first that would please a much bigger crowd than the few people who wasted money on an electric car.
It's probably going to attract more investment dollars from automotive manufacturers who are looking for improvements in this market. Consumer device manufacturers might take an interest, but I'm guessing that there fewer R&D dollars from these guys.
 

jobeard

TS Ambassador
Why test it in electric cars though? I would rather my Phone could last longer and I'm pretty sure if this kind of tech can get into phones first that would please a much bigger crowd than the few people who wasted money on an electric car.
catch 22. Fewer buyers (like me) because either the range is too short or the charge time too long. I need 2hrs duration and about a one hr recharge time - - and boy I'd be all over an electric car, showing big oil where to stick it.