Razer launches the modular Tomahawk gaming PC

Humza

Posts: 779   +161
Staff member
In brief: Revealed as a concept at CES earlier this year, Razer's compact SFF Tomahawk gaming desktop has finally launched with 9th-gen Intel NUC components inside and the option of fitting up to an Nvidia RTX 3080. The base model starts at $2,399 and ships without a GPU, while buyers can also choose to spend another $800 and get the RTX 3080-equipped version for $3,199.

For reasons well known, pre-built PCs with latest-gen hardware have started to become increasingly appealing as of late. We recently saw Corsair offering the latest and greatest from AMD/Intel and Nvidia with the a7200 series, and now Razer has launched the compact Tomahawk gaming PC.

The modular, tool-less design of the Razer Tomahawk certainly makes it stand out in the SFF category, and even allows buyers to fit a beastly RTX 3080 (up to 320x140mm) inside the 10L chassis. They are, however, strictly limited in terms of CPU choice.

While support for Nvidia's latest GPUs is a welcome improvement over the concept (that featured a 2080 Ti at the time), Razer has done away with the cool-looking glass side panel for a rather plain design reminiscent of Gigabyte's eGPU enclosure. It's now also got RGB lighting in the base to match the look of its bigger siblings and features 2 x 120mm cooling fans that'll have the tough job of keeping all that tightly-packed hardware from getting toasty.

What Razer is still carrying over from the concept, however, is the older Intel 9th-gen NUC hardware where buyers only have the option of getting an 8C/16T i9-9980HK. Additionally, there's a 750W PSU inside the base model, along with 16GB RAM, 512GB of PCIe NVMe + 2TB of HDD storage, and an empty m.2 slot for future storage upgrades.

In terms of connectivity, there's Wi-Fi 6, 4 x USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-A ports, 2 x USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-C ports (with Thunderbolt 3 support), dual ethernet, an HDMI 2.0 port, and a pair of 3.5mm audio jacks.

Razer currently appears to be out of stock on its official website, where it's exclusively taking pre-orders for the SFF Tomahawk (at least, initially). Buyers lucky enough to own one of these (considering the supply/demand issues) will also get a one-year warranty.

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Uncle Al

Posts: 7,797   +6,452
The base model starts at $2,399 and ships without a GPU, while buyers can also choose to spend another $800 and get the RTX 3080-equipped version for $3,199.

Zowie! That's a lot of spare change!
 
Why would I pay more for this enclosure than a standard solid case?
I think this is aimed at pretty much just Razer fanboys. I don't particularly dislike anything they do, other than requiring a login to use their software, I think they are generally middle of the pack as far as quality.
 
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Neatfeatguy

Posts: 128   +144
I think this is aimed at pretty much just Razer fanboys. I don't particularly dislike anything they do, other than requiring a login to use their software, I think they are generally middle of the pack as far as quality.
You're so kind.

I call Razer's quality absolute horseshit. Had a $80 mouse fail across multiple aspects of the design and it happened right at the end of the warranty - literally, 2 days after the warranty (not to mention all the issues I had with it before complete failure happened). I reached out to customer support and they said they would not do anything about it since the warranty expired....2 days and they wouldn't make an exception.

On a side note, I've been using a cheap $20 mouse from Microsoft for the past 12 years now and she still works as good as the day I got her. No clicking issues, no scroll wheel issues, no tracking issues, all 5 buttons on the mouse still work. I use this mouse more than any other mouse I've owned because I've taken it with me between 3 different jobs I've had...the mouse is used 7-8 hours a day, 5 days a week. 35-40 hours a week...that's 1750+ hours a year it's been in use over the past 12 years and still going strong. Over 21 thousand hours on this mouse and still working fine.

Maybe 4-5 thousand hours for the Razer mouse after the 2 year warranty ended and the mouse went to hell in a handbasket. Left mouse button stopped working, scroll wheel broke (couldn't scroll nor click) and so many tracking issues regardless of surface used.

I wouldn't use Razer products if they paid me.
 
I cannot disagree with you although my experiences with Razer are fewer, I have heard of numerous horror stories regarding them. My only razer product is an original Mamba wireless mouse, yeah the one you put on a stand to charge, and while it never failed me it got put in a box in the closet years ago.
 
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neeyik

Posts: 1,601   +1,800
Staff member
While the Core i9-9980HK isn't a bad CPU, it is aimed for mobile platforms, with a default TDP of just 45W. So it'll throttle like a demented serial killer, unless Razer have upped the limit.

And it's also over two years old, from a design point of view. Mmmm, Razer...you're really spoiling us :confused:
 
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Burty117

Posts: 3,972   +1,902
I've used and bought a fair amount of Razer gear, mainly just keyboards and mice and only ever had one die on me after 6+ years of heavy use (and some angry abuse).

I don't rate their headsets, not good enough sound quality for the price but I haven't touched them in years so maybe they're better now.

Their keyboards though, absolute tanks, could actually use them as weapons.

I wouldn't consider anything else from Razer as it all seems to be massively overpriced, this computer especially.

Although I did hear good things about their speakers were worth the money.