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Researchers develop a smart assistant skill that can detect heart attacks and call for...

By Polycount ยท 7 replies
Jun 19, 2019
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  1. Heart attacks are easily one of the most terrifying medical emergencies out there. Though not always lethal, that can change in an instant if rapid medical attention is not sought out -- and if you happen to suffer from cardiac arrest while you're alone in your home, it may be somewhat challenging (if not impossible) to grab a phone and call 911.

    According to a report from the University of Washington, artificial intelligence could help to solve this dilemma and prevent a few heart attack-related deaths. Researchers from the University have created a "skill" for Google Home and Alexa smart speakers (or in-device assistants) that can detect the sounds one might make during cardiac arrest.

    For example, if the skill hears "gasping" and "agonal breathing," it will automatically call emergency services for assistance. Apparently, the skill has proven to be quite effective in initial tests.

    ...if the skill hears "gasping" and "agonal breathing," it will automatically call emergency services for assistance.

    After being trained to recognize these sounds using data captured from real 911 calls, the skill's AI has been able to detect agonal breathing events with 97 percent accuracy. Impressively, it can detect these events from "up to" 20 feet away.

    It remains to be seen how effective this skill will be in real-world scenarios, but we're looking forward to finding out over time. You can read the full research report (written by Justin Chan, Thomas Rea, Shyamnath Gollakota, and Jacob E. Sunshine) over at Nature's npj Digital Medicine journal.

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  2. wiyosaya

    wiyosaya TS Evangelist Posts: 4,000   +2,295

    IMO, it is quite a comment that this skill was developed by researchers. It is obviously my skepticism, but it says something that the skill was not developed by crApazon or gagme.
     
  3. zorven

    zorven TS Rookie

    I have to wonder what the false positive rate is in the real world.
     
  4. mls067

    mls067 TS Enthusiast Posts: 44   +30

    Yeah, my cat would set that thing off I bet ;-)
     
    TomSEA likes this.
  5. TomSEA

    TomSEA TechSpot Chancellor Posts: 3,124   +1,617

    LOL...I'm dubious about this too - especially with mls067's cat in the mix. :p

    BUT - cool to see various applications being developed for these types of devices. If this ends up working and saves even a few lives, then it's a huge deal.
     
    mls067 likes this.
  6. QuantumPhysics

    QuantumPhysics TS Evangelist Posts: 1,254   +910

    I'll say it again... I will NEVER put one of your spying devices in my house under any circumstances.
     
    Gixser likes this.
  7. Cycloid Torus

    Cycloid Torus Stone age computing - click on the rock below.. Posts: 4,067   +1,190

    Wonder what would happen from police procedural/horror/thriller soundtrack on my TV?
     
  8. Godel

    Godel TS Addict Posts: 173   +88

    I can see ambulances being called for teenagers having sex on the couch.
     

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