Samsung announces 50-megapixel smartphone sensor with DSLR-level auto-focus speeds

Shawn Knight

Posts: 13,441   +132
Staff member

ISOCELL GN1 is a 50-megapixel sensor with 1.2μm-sized pixels. The sensor leverages Samsung’s Dual Pixel technology to place two photodiodes side-by-side within a single pixel to receive light from multiple angles for phase detection. This results in “best-in-class auto-focusing with 100 million phase detection auto-focus (PDAF) agents.”

By utilizing Tetracell technology which bins four pixel signals into one, Samsung has effectively doubled the image sensor’s pixel size to 2.4μm for brighter 12.5-megapixel photos. The company said it is also providing a software algorithm that can take light information from each photodiode to produce images comparable to 100 megapixels.

Software tricks in photography often fall into the gimmick category so we’ll reserve judgement until trying it out in person.

Samsung said the GN1 is additionally equipped with a Smart-ISO that intelligently selects the optimal ISO as well as real-time HDR that captures a scene in multiple exposures simultaneously. The package is also equipped with a gyro-based electronic image stabilization system that helps to cut down on unintentional camera shake.

On the video side, Sammy said the sensor is capable of recording at up to 8K at 30 frames per second.

The ISOCELL GN1 is scheduled to enter mass production this month. No word yet on when it’ll start showing up in consumer devices.

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mosu

Posts: 554   +193
"Samsung's new 50-megapixel image sensor excels in low-light environments
Should Sony be worried?" No, we should be happy, finally, it's competition!
 

p51d007

Posts: 2,832   +2,181
"The company said it is also providing a software algorithm that can take light information from each photodiode to produce images comparable to 100 megapixels."
So, you end up with a computer enhanced FAKE photo. Hey, if that's what you want, so be it, but to me, photography is about catching the available light on film, or in this case an image sensor. Not some computer enhanced crap.
 

neeyik

Posts: 1,881   +2,199
Staff member
"The company said it is also providing a software algorithm that can take light information from each photodiode to produce images comparable to 100 megapixels."
So, you end up with a computer enhanced FAKE photo. Hey, if that's what you want, so be it, but to me, photography is about catching the available light on film, or in this case an image sensor. Not some computer enhanced crap.
Not entirely so, as beneath each pixel in the CCD's colour filter there are 2 photodiodes, and therefore 2 light output values. It's just that they're both detecting the same light wavelength, hence why software is required to sample and blend the 100 million signals into a 50 Mpixel image. One could argue that all digital images are computer enhanced fakery, because the raw files produced always need some form of software processing before they can be used.
 

m-tec

Posts: 93   +50
If you have a lab develop and print your films it's no different, machines adjust exposure and density. If you develop your own film, you can adjust development and adjust the prints, doing your own analogue fakrey. Unless you shoot slide film (E6) your faking your images.
PS, I use film as well.
 

p51d007

Posts: 2,832   +2,181
. One could argue that all digital images are computer enhanced fakery, because the raw files produced always need some form of software processing before they can be used.

Most smartphone images are overprocessed jpg photos. Most smartphone users don't bother with DNG or other raw output. I shoot everything on my d-slr and phone in raw mode, processing them in photoshop (akin to the film days of using a developer bath, stop bath & rinse, processing them and developing them on paper. Of course ALL photos are processed, but, the built in software in camera phones, overprocesses.
 

Danny101

Posts: 1,837   +790
Most smartphone images are overprocessed jpg photos. Most smartphone users don't bother with DNG or other raw output. I shoot everything on my d-slr and phone in raw mode, processing them in photoshop (akin to the film days of using a developer bath, stop bath & rinse, processing them and developing them on paper. Of course ALL photos are processed, but, the built in software in camera phones, overprocesses.
Can you force raw as a global setting for all apps to use. I ask because I do inspections and I have to use the companies app to take pictures and for lack of a better word, it sucks. By the way, my favorite setting for detailed rich photos is the macro setting [ON].