Samsung teams with Stanford to create ultrahigh-res OLED display

Shawn Knight

Posts: 12,680   +124
Staff member
What just happened? Researchers at Stanford University in collaboration with the Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology (SAIT) have developed a new organic light-emitting diode (OLED) architecture that significantly boosts pixel density. The breakthrough could lead to major leaps in augmented and virtual reality applications where resolution is paramount to immersion.

While visiting Stanford from 2016 to 2018, SAIT scientist Won-Jae Joo sat in on a presentation by graduate student Majid Esfandyarpour about an ultrathin solar cell technology being developed in the lab of materials scientist Mark Brongersma. Joo immediately saw how the technology could have major implications beyond renewable energy.

Joo met with Esfandyarpour after the presentation, which ultimately led to their collaboration.

Unlike RGB OLEDs and white OLEDs currently in use, the new technique uses a base layer of reflective metal with nanoscale corrugations that can manipulate the reflective properties of light, allowing different colors to be displayed in the pixels.

During lab tests, the teams created miniature proof-of-concept pixels. When compared to traditional color-filtered white OLEDs like those found in televisions, their prototypes exhibited a higher color purity and double the luminescence efficiency, which is a measure of how bright a screen is versus how much energy it consumes.

With an ultrahigh pixel density of up to 10,000 pixels per inch, their image quality should far surpass what is possible with modern OLED technology and virtually eliminate the screen door effect when used in VR headsets. What’s more, they’re easier to manufacture and more cost-efficient, too.

Samsung is working to build a full-size display although no timeline was provided for when that might be complete or when consumer products would be ready to go to market.

Masthead credit: leungchopan

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Irata

Posts: 976   +1,438
TechSpot Elite
Unlike RGB OLEDs and white OLEDs currently in use, the new technique uses a base layer of reflective metal with nanoscale corrugations that can manipulate the reflective properties of light, allowing different colors to be displayed in the pixels.
Isn‘t that the same principle Cephalopods use to emit light in different colors? It really sounds like the way Iridophores work.
 
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SixTymes

Posts: 80   +48
Very interesting, especially the claim of "image quality should far surpass what is possible with modern OLED technology"

I certainly hope to see this, and be able to afford it one day.
 
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kiwigraeme

Posts: 160   +116
What it ticks nearly all the boxes cheaper to make, more energy efficient and much better quality.
Is not clear on total NITS or whatever.
If can be scaled up easily
It says cheaper to make - but that doesn't mean easier to make.
Does not mention lifetime and any time line degradation.
Nor whether better or worse for burn in ( burn in is a factor of heat as well - so more power efficiency should mean less )

Does not seem to be vapourware - LG will be scrambling.
Competition for OLED screen production - not just LG panels tuned by Sony , Panasonic etc
Hopefully if good Samsung onsells or licenses it - as I try to not buy Samsung as their attention to detail and reliability is not as good as Japanese manufacturers.

My personal take - was I was going to treat my family to a a discounted topline Panny 65 next year as hopefully will have hdmi 2.1 ( gaming ) - plus best cinematic screen, Now in a few years after this may come along with much better HDR etc and colour purity . So maybe a cheap 65 LG C10 or whatever - gift to family if these seem to be the real deal when reading about it in a years time -
Still like my plasma anyway - though is now well beaten
 

Endymio

Posts: 1,017   +856
It sounds good on paper ... but the devil is in the details, of course, For anyone who remembers the hype (and eventual drawn-out disappointment) of SED and FED displays, this cycle is all to familiar.


Is not clear on total NITS or whatever.
If can be scaled up easily
It says cheaper to make - but that doesn't mean easier to make.
Does not mention lifetime and any time line degradation.
Nor whether better or worse for burn in
Good points -- but it's just an OLED screen with a metamaterial reflector. So it should have essentially identical characteristics with respect to longevity and burn-in, as the metamaterial wouldn't suffer from those factors.
 
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wiyosaya

Posts: 5,479   +3,575
It sounds good on paper ... but the devil is in the details, of course, For anyone who remembers the hype (and eventual drawn-out disappointment) of SED and FED displays, this cycle is all to familiar.
At least part of the reason SED never made it to market is in part because the company that owned the IP that SED was based on accused Epson of violating an agreement between them and Epson. Epson chose not to fight. I do not think the comparison is apt.
 

Endymio

Posts: 1,017   +856
At least part of the reason SED never made it to market is in part because the company that owned the IP that SED was based on accused Epson of violating an agreement between them and Epson. Epson chose not to fight. I do not think the comparison is apt.
I believe you're thinking of Canon, not Epson. Canon was the first to begin SED research and commercialization, and Canon wound up in a contractual dispute with Applied Nanotech. However, Canon won the legal battle fairly quickly, and even before that, had essentially scrubbed that particular bit of IP from their process (Applied Nano only owned a small portion of the total IP in any case).

However, Canon still canned the technology regardless. Sony had a similar display tech (FED) which wound up in the trashbin as well.
 

moon982

Posts: 39   +5
So this does not have screen burn in like problem OLED have?

This new OLED does not have screen burn ins?

I seen videos on YouTube showing people having OLED TV showing logo burn in and will not go away . People watching sports and news and logos and bars burn in.

That why OLED is okay for movies but terrible for computer monitors with menu bar that sit there and don’t move.
 

kiwigraeme

Posts: 160   +116
So this does not have screen burn in like problem OLED have?

This new OLED does not have screen burn ins?

I seen videos on YouTube showing people having OLED TV showing logo burn in and will not go away . People watching sports and news and logos and bars burn in.

That why OLED is okay for movies but terrible for computer monitors with menu bar that sit there and don’t move.

here is a YT vid

With my Plasma I ran about 5 days of aging loop - My partner and on play Fornite on it all the time - but I have educated them - to turn off screen when paused .

I think companies are getting better at mitigating it - Panasonic claim to do extra cooling - as when as dimming , shifting etc .

Depends on usage - - if PC turn off task bars , dark mode , screen savers - reduce brightness ( a big one ) .
I think a later model , varied usage , and wise use - should be fine - a lot of burn in is only visible on plain colour screens - You only notice IPS screen leak in dim light or dark scenes .
Lot's of phones are OLED -
If you watch CNN or FOX all the time a problem - also if have unmovable subtitles all the time - it will be a problem .

Plus I imagine hooking for PC to a 65 inch OLED is for gaming/ media center and not browsing and work
 

Markoni35

Posts: 818   +300
They claim it's a lot brighter, but they never mention the contrast. That could mean that it's similar to older LED technologies where black is more like gray. With OLED technology when you have RGB(0,0,0) pixel it's guaranteed to be black, because it simply doesn't emit the light. With LED and similar technologies you can never reach per-pixel-black because the screen is backlit.
 

Endymio

Posts: 1,017   +856
They claim it's a lot brighter, but they never mention the contrast. That could mean that it's similar to older LED technologies where black is more like gray.
No, look at the diagram or read the underlying link. It's still an OLED-based emissive technology.