Texas Instruments will start building new 300mm semiconductor wafer fabs next year

jsilva

Posts: 269   +1
Staff
What just happened? Texas Instruments announced it will build 300mm wafer fabrication plants in Sherman, Texas, to tackle the increasing demand for semiconductors worldwide. Construction of the first two plants will start in 2022, with plans to establish a total of four plants over time.

Texas Instruments' new plants will create many job opportunities and expand the company's chip manufacturing operations in the US, increasing its 300mm wafer production. If Texas Instruments ends up filling all four slots for fabs, the semiconductor manufacturer expects to create 3,000 direct jobs and invest about $30 billion.

The construction of these plants comes as an answer to the ever-increasing demand for semiconductors worldwide, which led to the ongoing global chip shortage that's ravaging the technology and automotive industries. However, the first fabs should only come online in 2025, so their products won't help much with the current problem but should prevent situations like this in the future.

"TI's future analog and embedded processing 300-mm fabs at the Sherman site are part of our long-term capacity planning to continue to strengthen our manufacturing and technology competitive advantage and support our customers' demand in the coming decades," said Rich Templeton, chairman, president and CEO at TI. "Our commitment to North Texas spans more than 90 years, and this decision is a testament to our strong partnership and investment in the Sherman community."

Apart from the upcoming plants, Texas Instruments already has a DMOS6 300mm fab in Dallas, Texas, and two 300mm fabs in Richardson, Texas: the RFAB1 and the almost complete RFAB2. The latter is expected to start production in the second half of 2022.

Besides the Texas fabs, TI also recently acquired Micron's former 3D XPoint fab (LFAB) in Lehi, Utah, for $900 million. This plant should begin production in early 2023.

Alongside Texas Instruments, Samsung is also planning to build a $17 billion semiconductor wafer fabrication plant in Texas. This plant, however, is supposedly targeted at manufacturing 5nm wafers.

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psycros

Posts: 3,809   +4,938
I hope TI has some good responsive batteries/generators and is not relying on the robustness of Texas's under-regulated power system.

Uh, they've been in Texas since their inception so nobody has a clue what you're babbling about. TI = Texas Instruments.
 

Revolution 11

Posts: 104   +129
Uh, they've been in Texas since their inception so nobody has a clue what you're babbling about. TI = Texas Instruments.
Yes I know that. Why make more fabs after a event that ruined months of your production? Especially when it has happened twice before in recent decades in Texas and the state was explictly warned to upgrade its power network?

Why not make your new fabs in New Mexico or Arizona?
 

Crinkles

Posts: 202   +196
Yes I know that. Why make more fabs after a event that ruined months of your production? Especially when it has happened twice before in recent decades in Texas and the state was explictly warned to upgrade its power network?

TI is a Texas company with Texas people and principals.

Why not make your new fabs in New Mexico or Arizona?

Taxes, property, utilities. And TI is Texas šŸ˜‚
 

Danny101

Posts: 1,997   +830
The current shortage will probably be over by the time these are finished and running. But they might at least prevent another shortage later on.
 

Underdog

Posts: 216   +116
Its about time the US and other western countries swapped the benefits of cheap goods & cheap manufacturing in China for more self-sufficiency. OK, so it will take a while to train enough burger flippers and Uber drivers to work in the new production plants and the products will have to cost more but with that comes the knowledge that some foreign power can't cripple your technological future by switching off the supply chain.
 

Crinkles

Posts: 202   +196
Its about time the US and other western countries swapped the benefits of cheap goods & cheap manufacturing in China for more self-sufficiency.

Arizona, California, New York, Texas, Washington, Oregon, Vermont, Massachusetts, Idaho, Utah.
All these states have (or had) semiconductor manufacturing, China is not and has never been a sole supplier to the US for IC's. This discussion doesn't have anything to do with flippin' hamburgers.