The GT710 is back, this time with four 4K HDMI ports

midian182

Posts: 8,332   +103
Staff member
Why it matters: Do you remember Nvidia’s GeForce GT710? Probably not. The card was a budget offering when launched back in 2016, costing around $35 for the 1GB option and $40 for the 2GB model. Now, a redesigned version has arrived, and this time it comes with four 4K-capable HDMI ports.

The new GT710 has appeared on Asus’ website. Like the original, it features a mere 192 CUDA cores on the 87 mm2 GK208 Kepler die from 2015, and the GPU engine clock remains at 954 MHz while the memory clock is 5012 MHz.

Some improvements to the GT710 include the memory going from 1GB/2GB of DDR3 to 2GB of GDDR5. Interestingly, we heard earlier this month that Nvidia's GTX 1650 graphics cards are transitioning to GDDR6 due to the “industry running out of GDDR5,” so it’s unclear if this might affect the new GT710 down the line.

The biggest change to the card is that it now comes with four HDMI video outputs, rather than the original single DVI, VGA, and HDMI ports. Asus notes that the card supports resolutions of 3840 x 2160 at 60Hz, but only for one monitor. It can power multiple displays at 4K, but only at 30Hz. Asus also writes that as the card is passively cooled it will run quiet.

Four years ago, Nvidia claimed the GT710 offered "up to 10x better performance than integrated graphics," which even back then might have been stretching the truth. You’re certainly not going to be playing Metro Exodus on it, but the card will likely find use in the enterprise sector where it could power multiple advertising displays. The GT710 is expected to cost around $50 at launch.

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Nobina

Posts: 3,967   +4,560
So if you want extra ports and nothing else this is what you get? I don't know any other uses.
 

Soulburn74

Posts: 125   +67
Perfect for home lab esxi host that doesn't have onboard integrated gpu or ipmi, the cheaper the better, only going to power text based console for troubleshooting anyways.
 

Vulcanproject

Posts: 1,578   +2,916
So if you want extra ports and nothing else this is what you get? I don't know any other uses.

It's niche. Still has decent video decode though too, better than most iGPUs before 2017. Can see how it would be useful in certain scenarios rather than overhauling a machine completely.
 

neeyik

Posts: 2,273   +2,753
Staff member
That's only at 4K, right? At 1080p it can surely do 60Hz or more.
I hope so! I’ll go and see if the specs make it clear as to what it can support.

Edit: no luck on Asus’ website; I’ll have to dig out Nvidia’s Kepler architecture whitepaper to see what capabilities the video engine has.

Edit:: Doh. I is stupid. Basic maths tells you the answer: 4K is 8294400 pixels, so if it can that many pixels at 60 Hz and twice as many at half the rate, then the video engine has a max pixel output rate of about 497 Mpixels/sec.

1080p is roughly 2 million pixels, so one monitor would theoretically max at 250Hz, 2 monitors would be 125 Hz and so on. That means 4 monitors at 1080p would be 62 Hz.
 
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Mokona

Posts: 7   +5
I hope so! I’ll go and see if the specs make it clear as to what it can support.

Edit: no luck on Asus’ website; I’ll have to dig out Nvidia’s Kepler architecture whitepaper to see what capabilities the video engine has.

Edit:: Doh. I is stupid. Basic maths tells you the answer: 4K is 8294400 pixels, so if it can that many pixels at 60 Hz and twice as many at half the rate, then the video engine has a max pixel output rate of about 497 Mpixels/sec.

1080p is roughly 2 million pixels, so one monitor would theoretically max at 250Hz, 2 monitors would be 125 Hz and so on. That means 4 monitors at 1080p would be 62 Hz.
Or, even simpler math:
4K is essentially 4x 1080p, so if it can do 60Hz at 4K, it should be able to do 60Hz at 1080p four times. That may be oversimplified, but, as you've shown, the basic math of it works out.
 

neeyik

Posts: 2,273   +2,753
Staff member
Or, even simpler math:
4K is essentially 4x 1080p, so if it can do 60Hz at 4K, it should be able to do 60Hz at 1080p four times. That may be oversimplified, but, as you've shown, the basic math of it works out.
Ha! Perfect ? In my excuse, I’m old and tired, but thanks for the much neater solution to the original query.
 

Tom Yum

Posts: 189   +451
One computer, multiple 4K displays!

Seems ok for most businesses.

The problem I see is that most business machines are SFF or USFF format which won't take full height cards. Definitely if this was low-profile (potentially using 4x mini-DP instead of full size HDMI) then this card would make a lot of sense. By having it full height they have limited it to larger tower-based PC's, and those sort of machines are rarely limited to a single PCI-E x1 slot, so that benefit is removed also. It is a blend of contradictory design choices that makes it difficult to fathom where this product would be the best solution.
 

veLa

Posts: 1,176   +850
Do you remember Nvidia’s GeForce GT710? Probably not.

Actually yes I do. When you work on machines in a business environment, display adapters like this are pretty common. They're cheap, they let you run multi-monitor configurations, and they're great for drop in upgrades or repairs. We have a whole bin in the IT equipment room full of used 8400GS, GT 210, and GT 710 cards.

What makes this model significant isn't just the fact it can do 2160p30 over 4 HDMI interfaces, it's the ability to use a PCIe 2.0 x1 slot for it all. With that tiny advantage, it can be dropped into almost any system that supports a full sized card.
 

captaincranky

Posts: 19,175   +8,323
The 710 is turd. I've owned one w/ 2 GB of memory, and I've never been able to do a successful installation of it.

1st try: My G-41 32 bit internet box was black screening, which I assumed was due to the VGA and main memory clashing. (2 GB at the time).,

I installed the 710, unplugged the IGP, set the BIOS to auto switch, and plugged the monitor into the card. It didn't make a bit of difference. The video still blacked out when I got too many tabs open.

I yanked the 710, put 2 more gigs of system RAM into the the machine, and voila, problem solved.

So, I thought I'd stuff the 710 into an XP SP 3 box to provide energy savings over the 9500 GT which was already in there. I installed the 710, got the latest driver Nvidia offered for XP, installed it, and got nothing but blue screens from it.

Yanked the 710, put the 9500 back in, and the machine is living happily ever after.
 

QuantumPhysics

Posts: 6,308   +7,248
The problem I see is that most business machines are SFF or USFF format which won't take full height cards. Definitely if this was low-profile (potentially using 4x mini-DP instead of full size HDMI) then this card would make a lot of sense. By having it full height they have limited it to larger tower-based PC's, and those sort of machines are rarely limited to a single PCI-E x1 slot, so that benefit is removed also. It is a blend of contradictory design choices that makes it difficult to fathom where this product would be the best solution.


I'm sure that someone would build them a tower that meets their needs.

This kinda device is for stores who run advertisements using a computer like when they wanna demonstrate TV quality.
 

alvincalmkid

Posts: 8   +4
I'm still using this VGA, 1GB version,,combine with A320+Ryzen 5 3500+16GB RAM. Work great just for programming & running VM.