This month's cumulative update for Windows 10 is a must if you're seeing random high CPU...

nanoguy

Posts: 772   +12
Staff member
In a nutshell: At the end of April, Microsoft released this month's cumulative update for Windows 10 as an optional update for versions 2004 and 20H2. This one doesn't include any security fixes, but it should solve a lot of the headaches experienced by users after the major security patch of last month.

Windows 10 is now installed on over 1.3 billion devices, after adding 300 million monthly active users over the last 12 months. As with any operating system that's so widely used, Microsoft is constantly working to add more functionality and improve its stability and security, for instance by removing all traces of Adobe Flash from it and patching vulnerabilities that could lead to large-scale cyberattacks.

However, every update fixes some issues while seemingly introducing several others, which may or may not impact you depending on your specific hardware and software configuration. For some people, the most recent Windows 10 update produced a number of issues with gaming performance and boot loops, which were eventually fixed through a system called Known Issue Rollback (KIR).

There are more fixes on the way, including one for a persisting bug that causes spikes in CPU usage. The root of the problem is apparently a race condition -- a situation where two threads are trying to access a shared memory space and "race" over performing a time-sensitive operation, sometimes rendering one or more processes or programs unresponsive.

If you happen to have issues with high CPU usage for no apparent reason or still experience trouble with lower-than-expected gaming performance, it might be worth installing the cumulative update preview (KB5001391) that's currently available through Windows Update. If you can wait, it's scheduled to roll out to all users on May 11.

This new update also addresses an issue that causes high memory usage for the lsass.exe process until the system becomes unstable. And if you have a laptop with hybrid graphics, it solves an issue where media playback won't work on an external monitor connected through the integrated GPU while using hardware accelerated decoding on the dedicated GPU.

Permalink to story.

 

trparky

Posts: 901   +953
Actually, I've installed it and have had absolutely no issues on two machines that I own. One's a notebook and the other is a self-built desktop system with enthusiast-grade parts.
 

Theinsanegamer

Posts: 2,452   +3,607
I've had these kind of high random CPU spikes on win 7 on certain configs.
The only time I saw something like this was on systems originally built for XP, like the dell optiplex 320, which wouldnt shut off their chipset GPU when a PCIe GPU was installed. XP didnt care, but 7 threw a nuclear tantrum over it.
 

bobc4012

Posts: 142   +56
Anyone who installs a Windows patch on release is just a beta tester. Always wait.
Then you might be waiting forever! Some days, it seems like its one security patch after another. Hard to pinpoint, but after one of the last two patches, my monitor was taken out. I hooked up an older and I noticed occasional screen blacking. I saw this before after an update, then a couple updates later, it went away. Then after a significant update, a number of my settings get changed, usually to as system default. Should have stayed with Windows 7 and I'd still have some of the OEM installed apps. At the end of last June, an update took them out and those that I used on occasion, no longer work and wouldn't re-install. I also notice the list of system processes seems to get longer with every update.
 

Puiu

Posts: 4,599   +3,437
TechSpot Elite
The only time I saw something like this was on systems originally built for XP, like the dell optiplex 320, which wouldnt shut off their chipset GPU when a PCIe GPU was installed. XP didnt care, but 7 threw a nuclear tantrum over it.
Most of the time it's just conflicts with drivers.
 
In a nutshell: At the end of April, Microsoft released this month's cumulative update for Windows 10 as an optional update for versions 2004 and 20H2. This one doesn't include any security fixes, but it should solve a lot of the headaches experienced by users after the major security patch of last month.

Windows 10 is now installed on over 1.3 billion devices, after adding 300 million monthly active users over the last 12 months. As with any operating system that's so widely used, Microsoft is constantly working to add more functionality and improve its stability and security, for instance by removing all traces of Adobe Flash from it and patching vulnerabilities that could lead to large-scale cyberattacks.

However, every update fixes some issues while seemingly introducing several others, which may or may not impact you depending on your specific hardware and software configuration. For some people, the most recent Windows 10 update produced a number of issues with gaming performance and boot loops, which were eventually fixed through a system called Known Issue Rollback (KIR).

There are more fixes on the way, including one for a persisting bug that causes spikes in CPU usage. The root of the problem is apparently a race condition -- a situation where two threads are trying to access a shared memory space and "race" over performing a time-sensitive operation, sometimes rendering one or more processes or programs unresponsive.

If you happen to have issues with high CPU usage for no apparent reason or still experience trouble with lower-than-expected gaming performance, it might be worth installing the cumulative update preview (KB5001391) that's currently available through Windows Update. If you can wait, it's scheduled to roll out to all users on May 11.

This new update also addresses an issue that causes high memory usage for the lsass.exe process until the system becomes unstable. And if you have a laptop with hybrid graphics, it solves an issue where media playback won't work on an external monitor connected through the integrated GPU while using hardware accelerated decoding on the dedicated GPU.

Permalink to story.

This update blocked access to USB3.1 connected WD Elements 4TB HD on a PC running Win10 Pro 64bit. USB access to mouse and keyboard cotinue to work normally. Was foolish enough not to backup immediately before update and to cleanup update System files before trying to run Retrospect backup to the HD. Anyone know of a fix?