This wristband lets friends, family, and even bosses monitor your mood

midian182

Posts: 6,763   +61
Staff member
In brief: It's no surprise that cases of depression and anxiety have increased since the start of the pandemic. Isolation, fear, loneliness, and lockdowns can erode even the strongest person's mental health, but a wearable could benefit those who can't or won't seek help.

Called the Moodbeam, the device features just two buttons—one for recording whenever you feel happy (yellow) and the other for sad moments (blue). It's the work of a UK based firm, also called Moodbeam.

By logging the different times of day when users feel sudden changes in their emotional state, the wristband and accompanying app can show patterns and trends, allowing wearers to identify situations that cause negative feelings.

A potentially better use of the technology is sharing user information with family and friends. Many people aren't comfortable admitting they're struggling mentally, but the Moodbeam could help them connect with others without asking for help directly.

The wearable is also positioned as a way for companies to (optionally) monitor the wellbeing of staff working from home who may be experiencing isolation and loneliness. "Businesses are trying to get on top of staying connected with staff working from home. Here they can ask 500 members: 'You ok?' without picking up the phone," Moodbeam co-founder Christina Colmer McHugh told the BBC.

Launched back in 2016, Colmer came up with Moodbeam after discovering her daughter was struggling at school and wanted a way for her child to let her know how she was feeling. The device was thrust under the spotlight recently as the pandemic brought more mental health concerns.

While the £50 ($67) Moodbeam's primary function could be replicated using an app or smartwatch, its simplicity will likely appeal to older society members and busy workers.

For those who work remotely and love the outdoors, Nissan's concept vehicle could offer the best of both worlds.

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Shadowboxer

Posts: 1,490   +1,087
This looks like a great way to make tonnes of easy money out of corporations who want to be seen to be doing something to tackle the “mental health crisis”.

I’m sorry but most of us don’t have mental illness. We are miserable because we can’t socialise, eat out, go on dates, go on holidays etc. I’m not saying mental illness isn’t a thing of course it is but being depressed when you’re effectively locked in your house for months on end is not a sign of an unhealthy mind.
 

Uncle Al

Posts: 8,014   +6,783
Having worked for corporate America for over 45 years I can't help but be suspicious of those companies that will want to give you one and insist you wear it daily for the "good of the company and other employee's'". We have seen companies alter everything from automobiles, computer, phones, etc. so they could track you and spy on everything you do. This certainly won't be any different ......
 

yRaz

Posts: 3,666   +3,654
Having worked for corporate America for over 45 years I can't help but be suspicious of those companies that will want to give you one and insist you wear it daily for the "good of the company and other employee's'". We have seen companies alter everything from automobiles, computer, phones, etc. so they could track you and spy on everything you do. This certainly won't be any different ......
I worked for Bayer briefly, never again.....
 

captaincranky

Posts: 16,680   +5,458
So now we need electronic, "mood rings"? My, my, how fragile our emotional state has become.

Unless of course, they just want you to think you're that fragile, to make tons of money from you.

Now if you'll excuse me, I going to go sit in the corner and suck my thumb... :rolleyes:
 

Scshadow

Posts: 647   +308
Notice its either sad or happy. Where is my angry button? Cause I'd tap the s**t out of an angry button.
 

Mister_K

Posts: 2,061   +766
This looks like a great way to make tonnes of easy money out of corporations who want to be seen to be doing something to tackle the “mental health crisis”.

I’m sorry but most of us don’t have mental illness. We are miserable because we can’t socialise, eat out, go on dates, go on holidays etc. I’m not saying mental illness isn’t a thing of course it is but being depressed when you’re effectively locked in your house for months on end is not a sign of an unhealthy mind.

People jump to mental illness conclusion way too early. Bad day? Always trying to point fingers at something. Hey, I am not good at this X because I think got Y. Doesn't help it's hard/expensive to identify valid concerns though.
 

yRaz

Posts: 3,666   +3,654
I tried to work for Bayer once. I didn't get the job.
I have never been treated so poorly in my life. I worked in the manufacture of equipment used with MRI machines. I was consistently told by the other employees I need to get out of there and the last straw for me was when I got a call from the HR manager and she called me a "smart a**". You don't get to talk like that if you work in HR.
 

captaincranky

Posts: 16,680   +5,458
People jump to mental illness conclusion way too early. Bad day?
IMHO, mental illness is rampant these days, particularly sociopathy. That said, this garbage they're trying to peddle is nothinbg more trhan a glorified "mood ring". Which, (and you can still find them), can be had for five dollars. (Of course, at that price, they would turn you finger green after wearing it for awhile. You'd be tired of it by then, so it wouldn't really matter

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