Toshiba says it created an algorithm that beats quantum computers using standard hardware

nanoguy

TS Addict
Staff member

Toshiba's announcement this week claims a new algorithm it's been perfecting for years is capable of analyzing market data much more quickly and efficiently than those used in some of the world's fastest supercomputers.

The algorithm is called the "Simulated Bifurcation Algorithm," and is supposedly good enough to be used in finding accurate approximate solutions for large-scale combinatorial optimization problems. In simpler terms, it can come up with a solution out of many possible ones for a particularly complex problem.

According to its inventor, Hayato Goto, it draws inspiration from the way quantum computers can efficiently comb through many possibilities. Work on SBA started in 2015, and Goto noticed that adding new inputs to a complex system with 100,000 variables makes it easy to solve it in a matter of seconds with a relatively small computational cost.

This essentially means that Toshiba's new algorithm could be used on standard desktop computers. To give you an idea how important this development is, Toshiba demonstrated last year that SBA can get highly accurate solutions for an optimization problem with 2,000 connected variables in 50 microseconds, or 10 times faster than laser-based quantum computers.

SBA is also highly scalable, meaning it can be made to work on clusters of CPUs or FPGAs, all thanks to the contributions of Kosuke Tatsumura, another one of Toshiba's senior researchers that specializes in semiconductors.

Companies like Microsoft, Google, IBM, and many others are racing to be the first with a truly viable quantum commercial system, but so far their approaches have produced limited results that live inside their labs.

Meanwhile, scientists like Goto and Kosuke are going back to the roots by exploring ways to improve on classical algorithms. Toshiba hopes to use SBA to optimize financial operations like currency trading and rapid-fire portfolio adjustments, but this could very well be used to calculate efficient routes for delivery services and molecular precision drug development.

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Angga B

TS Enthusiast
'tis almost sounds like cheating in games. LMAO.

Who would've thought that? AMD needs to hijack these engineers, inpromptu, before Intel snatched them.
 
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Bullwinkle M

TS Maniac
It does not appear to be useful for home use, or to mine bitcoins, or for cheating at games

In fact, it only appear to beat "CURRENT" quantum technology using "CURRENT" available algorythms for "ONE" specific application

Quantum computers will not be limited by "current" tech and "current" algorythms for only "one" specific job

I'm sure we can totally destroy quantum computers using "current" algorythms for "current" jobs using "generic" hardware in Billions of situations today

Tomorrow?
That's another story

Stay tuned kids!
 
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ET3D

TechSpot Paladin
In fact, it only appear to beat "CURRENT" quantum technology using "CURRENT" available algorythms for "ONE" specific application
True about "current", but "one specific application" is a very bad description of it. It's a large class of problems that are pretty much what quantum computers are thought to be better at. (And quantum computers aren't expected to be "useful for home use, or to mine bitcoins, or for cheating at games" either.)

And sure, quantum computers will likely end up doing better eventually, but you seem to be dismissing a pretty nice advancement just because of some future promise. There are a lot of promised technologies which might turn out eventually, but a 10x increase on current tech is certainly not to be sneezed at.
 

mbrowne5061

TS Evangelist
But can it mine Bitcoin?

Answer: YES - all of them.
Could you imagine though? Just a new mining algorithm that is so much more efficient than existing ones, that for a brief moment its doing >50% of the work and you could *in theory* just take the whole pot? You'd bankrupt so many people who just got lucky playing with 'internet funny money' back in the day.
 
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ET3D

TechSpot Paladin
Could you imagine though? Just a new mining algorithm that is so much more efficient than existing ones, that for a brief moment its doing >50% of the work and you could *in theory* just take the whole pot? You'd bankrupt so many people who just got lucky playing with 'internet funny money' back in the day.
That's not practical, though. A new mining algorithm won't be compatible with existing coins, so you won't be able to get your brief moment. Even if you could interrupt the blockchain, it'd be solved with a fork or such. Anyway, mining is heavy not because of the algorithm but because it's designed to be less efficient the more people do it. That comes from the social engineering aspects of crypto, not the technical aspects.
 

CaptainTom

TS Evangelist
Could you imagine though? Just a new mining algorithm that is so much more efficient than existing ones, that for a brief moment its doing >50% of the work and you could *in theory* just take the whole pot? You'd bankrupt so many people who just got lucky playing with 'internet funny money' back in the day.
It's pretty clear neither of you have any clue how mining works, or what a consensus network actually is.