In brief: Microsoft has confirmed that the June cumulative Windows update will break certain Bluetooth devices which the company has deemed unsecure. While we’ve seen plenty of Windows updates unintentionally break features in the past, this time it's an intentional change.

First reported by WindowsLatest, Microsoft said its new security update (CVE-2019-2102) addresses a vulnerability by intentionally preventing connections between the OS and “unsecure” Bluetooth devices.

“You may experience issues pairing, connecting or using certain Bluetooth devices after installing security updates released June 11, 2019,” the company writes.

Microsoft notes that any device using well-known keys to encrypt connections may be affected, which includes certain security fobs. All versions of Windows 10 will receive the update, along with Windows 8.1. Exactly how many devices might be borked by the update is unclear, and it appears that the only way to find out is if your Bluetooth accessory stops pairing.

Microsoft did say that advanced users can verify if their Bluetooth device is affected by checking the Event Log for the following event:

The Redmond company offered a solution for those who find their Bluetooth devices aren’t working: “contact the manufacturer of your Bluetooth device to determine if a device update exists.” If no updates exist, you’re left with the choice of avoiding the update, rolling it back, or buying a replacement device.

While we’ve seen plenty of Windows updates unintentionally break features in the past, this time it's an intentional change. Microsoft says it's there to make a computer more secure, but some users aren’t happy about the situation.