There's a lot to like about Nintendo's Switch console. Everything from its hybrid nature (which allows you to play at home or on the go) to its fantastic exclusive game library help set it apart from its more powerful competitors. However, there's also plenty of things people don't like about the console quite as much.

Though it often ultimately comes down to subjective preferences, one common nitpick among Switch fans relates to the Joy-Con controllers. They do their job well enough, but it's tough to deny that they aren't the most ergonomic input devices in the world.

That's where Hori's latest Switch accessory comes in: the Grip Controller. The Grip, as the name suggests, is primarily intended to make playing fast-paced Switch games a bit more comfortable and robust. As you can see from the images throughout this article, the Grip seems designed to better fit your hands -- indeed, its design is much more reminiscent of an Xbox One controller than a standard Joy-Con.

...the Grip boasts a larger overall size than the Joy-Con, programmable rear buttons, and a "turbo" toggle that can be used for "continuous fire" in shooters.

In terms of core features, the Grip boasts a larger overall size than the Joy-Con, programmable rear buttons, and a "turbo" toggle that can be used for "continuous fire" in shooters.

Though Nintendo does offer a more comfortable controller in the form of its "Pro" device, the downside is that you can't split it in half for on-the-go play. The Grip, on the other hand, can be used for just that -- the catch is, that's the only way it can be used. Unlike the standard Joy-Con, the Grip does not allow you to combine its two halves into one, and you can't use it wirelessly.

Naturally, this is pretty limiting for at-home players, but the trade-off might be worthwhile for Switch users who simply want a slightly-upgraded on-the-go gaming experience. The Grip is set to launch in Japan in September this year for 4,780 yen, which is the equivalent of roughly $44. The device is coming to the US, but we don't know when just yet.