Next-gen ARM GPUs to deliver console-like graphics to smartphones

By on August 6, 2012, 4:00 PM

ARM already holds the mobile GPU crown with their quad-core Mali-400 GPU found in the Galaxy S III while the already-announced but not-yet-released Mali T-604 was recently submitted for OpenCL 1.1 full profile conformance. There’s also the higher-end eight-core T-658 that’s scheduled to show up by the end of this year but ARM has piqued our interest even further by announcing three more GPUs to their already stacked roster.

The quad-core T-624 and the T-628 and T-678, both scalable up to eight cores, are described by Engadget as the next next-generation GPUs from ARM. These chips are said to deliver at least 50 percent more performance while maintaining the same silicon space and power requirements.

Specifically, ARM says these chips will allow for console-quality gaming and can run 4k and 8k video resolutions in addition to providing 60 FPS user interfaces on smartphones, smart TVs and tablets.

And if performance alone isn’t enough to get your attention, the company is taking things one step further by making a push to standardize mobile graphics with a new codec called Adaptive Scalable Texture Compression (ASTC). This codec, which takes up only two percent of real estate on the silicon, was submitted to standard-setting organization Khronos as an open source standard. The hope is that it will eliminate the fragmentation of standards as it supports all types of textures, color standards and bit-rates.

Seeing as how the T-604 was introduced nearly two years ago and still isn’t available, it could be several years before we see these new chips materialize into actual products.




User Comments: 7

Got something to say? Post a comment
wastedkill said:

So basically poo 2002 graphics :'( phones already have better graphics than that!

amstech amstech, TechSpot Enthusiast, said:

So the 5 or whatever year old triple core that is in a X360 with a 256MB GPU (or specs near this) is making it into a smartphone...it's a cool article but I wish I more excited.

And I hate small screens

Guest said:

ok, as I understand it, there's 480p resolution, 720p, 1080p, and 4k...WTF is 8k??

cliffordcooley cliffordcooley, TechSpot Paladin, said:

ok, as I understand it, there's 480p resolution, 720p, 1080p, and 4k...WTF is 8k??

Ultra High Definition Television

Ultra High Definition Television (or UHDTV, 2160p, 4320p, 4K, and 8K) is a digital video format proposed by NHK Science & Technology Research Laboratories and defined by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU). UHDTV has a resolution of either 3840 - 2160 (8.3 megapixels) or 7680 - 4320 (33.2 megapixels). 8K UHDTV has 16 times the number of pixels of the existing 1080p HDTV and brings 8K UHDTV to roughly the detail level of 15/70mm IMAX.

NHK advocates the 8K UHDTV format as Super Hi-Vision.

Guest said:

I thought humans couldn't see the difference between 720 and 1080 resolutions? Why go higher? What am I missing?

princeton princeton said:

I thought humans couldn't see the difference between 720 and 1080 resolutions? Why go higher? What am I missing?

You're missing the fact that your info is from an inaccurate source. The resolution that the human eye can see is determined by viewing distance. It's like the blanket statement than people can't see past 30fps, it's not accurate not only as a number but on the basis of trying to give it one number as a limit.

cliffordcooley cliffordcooley, TechSpot Paladin, said:

The resolution that the human eye can see is determined by viewing distance.
Exactly but lets not forget screen dimensions is also a factor.

Load all comments...

Add New Comment

TechSpot Members
Login or sign up for free,
it takes about 30 seconds.
You may also...
Get complete access to the TechSpot community. Join thousands of technology enthusiasts that contribute and share knowledge in our forum. Get a private inbox, upload your own photo gallery and more.