Amazon is adding 15 additional Boeing cargo jets to growing air fleet

Shawn Knight

TechSpot Staff
Staff member

Amazon on Tuesday announced a partnership with GE Capital Aviation Services (GECAS) to add 15 additional Boeing 737-800 cargo aircraft to its growing fleet of package movers. They’ll fly in the US out of Amazon’s more than 20 air gateways in the Amazon Air network, the company said.

By 2021, Amazon will have a total of 70 aircraft in its Air portfolio.

Dave Clark, Senior Vice President of Worldwide Operations at Amazon, said the new aircraft will create additional capacity for Amazon Air and help the company expand its Prime one-day shipping service.

Amazon earlier this year announced plans to make its Prime shipping perk one-day by default. It’s a strategy that could have a devastating effect on local convenience and drug stores, much like Amazon’s main business had on traditional brick and mortar retailers.

Amazon’s Air operation is already capable of transporting hundreds of thousands of packages each day and capacity is only going to grow moving forward.

The news comes just one week after FedEx announced it wouldn’t be renewing its domestic delivery contract with Amazon to transport packages via FedEx Express.

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TomSEA

TechSpot Chancellor
737-800 isn't the effected aircraft, the 737NG (-800 is a NG) have flown millions of flight hours with only smaller incidents common to all major types.
I don't trust an aviation company I can't trust.
You're aware that Boeing has the best safety record of any airline in the history of aviation with more than 10,000 commercial aircraft in service as we speak. That doesn't include what's flying for the military right now. They've built hundreds of thousands of aircraft that have flown billions of miles since 1916. They're on the cutting edge of technology, not only in the aviation division, but in space, missile, drone and communications.

If you can't trust them, then I guess you're going to be doing a lot of walking.
 

Nocturne

TS Maniac
Interesting I know they bought all the legacy American airlines and Us airways 767's that are getting a retrofit when fazed out when American takes receipt of the 787s. Pretty soon Philly will be a 787 and 330 hub to Europe, Asia, SA, India, and Africa, if they have their way.
 

Nocturne

TS Maniac
737-800 isn't the effected aircraft, the 737NG (-800 is a NG) have flown millions of flight hours with only smaller incidents common to all major types.
I don't trust an aviation company I can't trust.
You're aware that Boeing has the best safety record of any airline in the history of aviation with more than 10,000 commercial aircraft in service as we speak. That doesn't include what's flying for the military right now. They've built hundreds of thousands of aircraft that have flown billions of miles since 1916. They're on the cutting edge of technology, not only in the aviation division, but in space, missile, drone and communications.

If you can't trust them, then I guess you're going to be doing a lot of walking.
Well just that pile of junk 737 Maxx it's an engineering nightmare the plane shouldn't exist.
 

GeforcerFX

TS Evangelist
Well just that pile of junk 737 Maxx it's an engineering nightmare the plane shouldn't exist.
The only engineering "nightmare" was relying on a single sensor fail point, it was over confidence in the technology, but stupid none the less. The biggest fault was underselling the complexity and time needed to train pilots on the transition.
 

Nocturne

TS Maniac
I sure hope you've got insurance on that cargo.

If it's Boeing - I ain't Going.
737-800 isn't the effected aircraft, the 737NG (-800 is a NG) have flown millions of flight hours with only smaller incidents common to all major types.
It's only the Max series that is the problem...
Airbus re-engineered the 321 for the Neo series, US based Airlines demanded Boieng make an equiv. Plane but they were in the yellow to red money wise so basically they jacked the landing gear up to account for the larger engine and because the engines are larger and longer it puts the balance of the plane out to the point they added 2 anti stall censors on the plane because a steep pitch can cause the plane to stall but it's due to how forward long the engines are the main issues though are with the censors and how they need to disengauge the auto correct system that will point the nose down to prevent a stall even if the plane isnt in danger of one. Last time I heard they don't know if there is a fix or if they will fly again.
 

Nocturne

TS Maniac
The only engineering "nightmare" was relying on a single sensor fail point, it was over confidence in the technology, but stupid none the less. The biggest fault was underselling the complexity and time needed to train pilots on the transition.
Lol it's more than that. It's lazy engineering because they didn't want to take the time and money to redesign the new plane from the ground up. Also once again wrong info there are 2 censors that can fail and on top of that it's a bandaid for piss poor engineering, it has nothing to do with training in order to cancel the auto correct there is a series of actions that need to be done the main issue with the etheopia flight was they did it and the auto correct came immediately right back on now allowing them to pull the nose up, had nothing to do with piolets or training the system failed 100%.
 

mgwerner

TS Booster
737-800 isn't the effected aircraft, the 737NG (-800 is a NG) have flown millions of flight hours with only smaller incidents common to all major types.
I don't trust an aviation company I can't trust.
Better start walking then. Commercial and Cargo Aviation are still the safest ways to move people and boxes long distances fast. Buy the hype if you like, and pay extra for ground shipping.

The two widely-reported incidents had as much to do with poor training as it did the aircraft.

https://aviation-safety.net/graphics/infographics/Airliner-Accident-Fatalities-Per-Year-1946-2017.jpg
 

Nocturne

TS Maniac
737-800 isn't the effected aircraft, the 737NG (-800 is a NG) have flown millions of flight hours with only smaller incidents common to all major types.
I don't trust an aviation company I can't trust.
Better start walking then. Commercial and Cargo Aviation are still the safest ways to move people and boxes long distances fast. Buy the hype if you like, and pay extra for ground shipping.

The two widely-reported incidents had as much to do with poor training as it did the aircraft.

https://aviation-safety.net/graphics/infographics/Airliner-Accident-Fatalities-Per-Year-1946-2017.jpg
Had nothing to do with poor training, the pilots of the Etheopia flight did exactly what they were supposed to. The problem was that that both censors read different conditions and enacted the auto correct system to prevent a stall out which the plane wasn't in danger of, so like in all planes there are a series of actions taken with inputs to disable the system....guess what they dis- engaged it and it immediately came back on after a second or two sending the plane downwards..

Boeing screwed the pooch not the airlines, the only mistake they made was buying the halfa$$ed engineering mess Boeing put out rather than buying a 321 neo.
In fact the planes may never fly again according to the FAA because there is no fix for raising the landing gear height and slapping larger engines on the plane destabilizing it and putting it out of balance to the point it needed a super sensitive anti stall set of sensors.