AMD announces a new cloud gaming GPU and teases next-gen accelerators

mongeese

Posts: 626   +122
Staff member
In brief: It’s been almost a year since AMD released the RX 6800 XT, and they've got more to give. AMD have announced they’re releasing a new cloud gaming card based on it, called the Radeon Pro V620.

According to AMD VP Jeff Connell, the demand for cloud gaming warranted the creation of a GPU just for the job. But the V620 isn’t limited to gaming; it comes with partitioning capabilities that make it capable of streaming multiple desktops / workspaces from the cloud simultaneously.

The V620 differs from the 6800 XT mostly in its memory capacity, 32 GB instead of 16 GB. Otherwise, they’re not too different; they have the same 4,608 cores, similar clock speeds in the 2 GHz region, and the same 300 W TDP.

You can’t mistake one for the other, though. Because it’s designed for servers, the V620 has an unremarkable passive cooler that’s quite a bit smaller than the plastic and metal behemoth strapped to the 6800 XT. It needs case fans to keep it cool.

  RX 6800 XT Pro V620 Pro W6800
MSRP $649 N/A $2,249
Release date Nov. 2020 Nov. 2021 Jun. 2021
Cores 4608 3840
Base clock 1825 MHz 2075 MHz
Boost clock 2250 MHz 2200 MHz 2320 MHz
Memory 16 GB of GDDR6 32 GB of GDDR6
Memory bus 256-bit / 512 GB/s

AMD isn’t releasing the V620 to retail and they don’t seem interested in providing it to OEMs, which is unsurprising but disappointing. If you want to buy a GPU with 32 GB of memory you’re limited to the less powerful W6800.

Alternatively, you could wait for a virtualization company like Shadow to pick up the V620 and sell it to you in a monthly subscription. Google Stadia is another likely candidate for the card if you just want to game.

If 32 GB of memory isn’t enough for you, AMD can take it up a notch. On Monday, AMD CEO Dr Lisa Su will helm the AMD Accelerated Data Center presentation, during which she will announce the next generation of AMD Compute GPUs and Epyc CPUs.

Past leaks have indicated that AMD’s new Instinct Accelerator has 128 GB of HBM2E. It could be one of the largest GPUs ever made, hence the massive heatsinks in the teaser image above.

AMD won’t have long to rest on their laurels, though. Nvidia CEO Jensen Huang will strike back on Tuesday during the Nvidia GTC 2021 Fall keynote. Stay tuned!

Permalink to story.

 

Uncle Al

Posts: 9,279   +8,443
The title "Gaming GPU" might be one of the most over rated title ever given. AND is the marketing departments excuse for jacking up otherwise good graphic cards. I've been gaming since before the first generation of DOOM showed up and only once had a game not run successfully and decently solely due to an out of date graphic's card. It's time for the buying public to demand these companies lower their prices and stop all the hype. It can only be done through the power of your wallet and now is a great time to lower the boom .....
 

Dimitriid

Posts: 2,248   +4,361
This is mostly a non-news item for gamers with the possible exception of driver support: AMD being AMD might do things at least as open as Nvidia and allow GPU Paravirtualization not only for this new product but for consumer and workstation GPUs too.

And that could allow a tiny community of nerds out there (Looking at you Level1techs) to accomplish decent, painless* paravirtualization servers on Linux so you can actually grab something like a 5900x and a 6800xt and serve 3 clients with a single virtualization "server" that's actually made out of all consumer parts, which is neat.
 

elementalSG

Posts: 270   +478
I remember the days of LAN parties when we used to actually lug our 30lb CRTs and desktop towers to someone’s house to play Quake/UT/Doom.

I know these cards are probably too expensive, but if a bunch of friends pooled some money to build one of these virtualized gaming servers, I’m wondering if all you have to do is have each friend bring a laptop (of nearly any spec) and use the GPU virtualization. Won’t have to worry about latency issues on a LAN like with Google Stadia or the NVidia equivalent.

But then maybe I am just nostalgic for those LAN party days…
 

Geralt

Posts: 1,300   +2,076
The title "Gaming GPU" might be one of the most over rated title ever given. AND is the marketing departments excuse for jacking up otherwise good graphic cards. I've been gaming since before the first generation of DOOM showed up and only once had a game not run successfully and decently solely due to an out of date graphic's card. It's time for the buying public to demand these companies lower their prices and stop all the hype. It can only be done through the power of your wallet and now is a great time to lower the boom .....
Mining GPU better.
 

Geralt

Posts: 1,300   +2,076
I remember the days of LAN parties when we used to actually lug our 30lb CRTs and desktop towers to someone’s house to play Quake/UT/Doom.

I know these cards are probably too expensive, but if a bunch of friends pooled some money to build one of these virtualized gaming servers, I’m wondering if all you have to do is have each friend bring a laptop (of nearly any spec) and use the GPU virtualization. Won’t have to worry about latency issues on a LAN like with Google Stadia or the NVidia equivalent.

But then maybe I am just nostalgic for those LAN party days…
Good times! Playing Unreal Tournament in a LAN party.
 

kiwigraeme

Posts: 1,298   +950
I remember the days of LAN parties when we used to actually lug our 30lb CRTs and desktop towers to someone’s house to play Quake/UT/Doom.

I know these cards are probably too expensive, but if a bunch of friends pooled some money to build one of these virtualized gaming servers, I’m wondering if all you have to do is have each friend bring a laptop (of nearly any spec) and use the GPU virtualization. Won’t have to worry about latency issues on a LAN like with Google Stadia or the NVidia equivalent.

But then maybe I am just nostalgic for those LAN party days…
I think I made a post about a couple of weeks ago - about this - that if someone can do a deal with game developers - its a good business model - You can now rental powerful data servers online at the moment - so why shouldn't people be able to book a game server for x hours for y players for any game you choose . If your case players can choose to use GPU cycles or not depending on their setup ,
I don't play online - but guaranteed lobby , guaranteed resources , no trolls , modified rules/conditions .
Could even have external controlled knockouts , leaderboards.
All controlled by gaming groups - not the game company

A school or university only comp - a company competition .
If they save a game state - then can run like an old VACs or pdp computer - people log on -put in inputs - Server runs as long as necessary to determine outcome - so probably a great wargame solution ( though imagine this happens already on someones computer )
 

Sausagemeat

Posts: 1,597   +1,422
I think I made a post about a couple of weeks ago - about this - that if someone can do a deal with game developers - its a good business model - You can now rental powerful data servers online at the moment - so why shouldn't people be able to book a game server for x hours for y players for any game you choose . If your case players can choose to use GPU cycles or not depending on their setup ,
I don't play online - but guaranteed lobby , guaranteed resources , no trolls , modified rules/conditions .
Could even have external controlled knockouts , leaderboards.
All controlled by gaming groups - not the game company

A school or university only comp - a company competition .
If they save a game state - then can run like an old VACs or pdp computer - people log on -put in inputs - Server runs as long as necessary to determine outcome - so probably a great wargame solution ( though imagine this happens already on someones computer )
Isn’t that basically stadia? They have like racks full of GPUs (some custom silicon variants of Vega 56 I believe) and they have deals with games companies to stream those games to you and play online with others.