AMD launches Ryzen Mobile APUs with Vega graphics

Greg S

TS Evangelist

Bringing the Zen architecture to mobile devices, Raven Ridge APUs are making their way to laptops just in time for the holiday season. Targeting ultrathin and 2-in-1 devices, the AMD Ryzen 7 2700U and Ryzen 5 2500U combine Zen with Vega graphics into an SoC for greatly improved performance.

The Ryzen 7 2700U boasts 144% more performance in multi-threaded tasks compared to Intel's i7 8550U and also claims 161% greater graphics performance. Even though these numbers are for synthetic benchmarks, real world performance could be promising.

Both the Ryzen 7 2700U and Ryzen 5 2500U feature 4 cores with 8 threads attached to Vega GPU cores through an Infinity Fabric interface. A configurable TDP allows for a range of 9W to 25W with 15W being considered the nominal TDP.

As part of AMD's SenseMI technology, Precision Boost 2 dynamically adjusts clock speeds in 25MHz increments assuming that power consumption and temperatures are in check. Unlike other Ryzen CPUs, each of these Raven Ridge APUs have only one Core Complex (CCX).

Implementing only a single CCX is an important step forward for reducing power consumption enough to lower temperatures and fit Ryzen into slim devices. For devices that have upgraded cooling capabilities, AMD will provide certification for extended frequency ranges. Devices that can pass AMD's Ultimate XFR Performance certification, Precision Boost 2 will be more aggressive in raising both CPU and GPU clock speeds.

The Ryzen 5 2500U differentiates itself from the 2700U with only 8 instead of 10 graphics compute units. It also has a lower GPU clock at 1100MHz instead of 1300MHz. Both APUs feature 2 MB of L2 and 4 MB of L3 cache. Up to 2400 MHz DDR4 RAM is supported in a dual channel configuration, although some OEMs may resort to running only a single channel.

Gaming performance on these low power APUs is expected to be reasonably good considering that these are not intended to be used for extreme performance needs. The Vega GPU cores chosen for both APUs are capable of providing playable performance for many popular titles.

Running on an HP Envy X360 with Ryzen 7 2700U and configured with 8 GB of RAM, less demanding games can easily remain over 30 FPS at 1080p. Lowering the resolution will be required for more intensive games, but considering the size and weight of HP's X360 thin and laptop as well as battery life, this is a reasonable compromise.

In terms of efficiency, Ryzen Mobile has come in above expectations. AMD set a goal in 2014 to increase energy efficiency by a factor of 25 by 2020. Compared to just three years ago, Raven Ridge is nearly six times more efficient than Kaveri which launched in 2014.

At least three different laptops with Ryzen Mobile will be available by the end of November. The HP Envy X360, Lenovo IdeaPad 720S, and Acer Swift 3 will all be available with Ryzen inside. Dell, Asus, and other OEMs are expected to release their own laptops with Ryzen Mobile in early 2018.

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Vulcanproject

TS Evangelist
This is it, what I have been waiting for AMD to really give notebooks a kick in the pants. Budget machines have been stuck on 2 cores and mediocre integrated graphics for far too long.

If AMD can shake it up so you can get a 4 core machine with more graphics performance than any of Intel's integrated solutions without hitting up battery life too hard it'll be great.

These parts are obviously meant for slim machines but they look useful, should have no trouble standing to Intel's very best iGPUs that are usually reserved only for their highest end mobile CPUs
 

ZackL04

TS Guru
This is it, what I have been waiting for AMD to really give notebooks a kick in the pants. Budget machines have been stuck on 2 cores and mediocre integrated graphics for far too long.

If AMD can shake it up so you can get a 4 core machine with more graphics performance than any of Intel's integrated solutions without hitting up battery life too hard it'll be great.

These parts are obviously meant for slim machines but they look useful, should have no trouble standing to Intel's very best iGPUs that are usually reserved only for their highest end mobile CPUs
Who said these will be budget chips?
 

meric

TS Addict
These are APUs, I'm more interested in hearing from the mobile CPU side. If they can do this kind of apu thing in a so little power envelope, I'm hopeful for a good mobile all-cpu design from them
 
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Reehahs

TS Guru
I like the inclusion of Passmark 9 in the performance benchmarks.

It would have been nice if Intel chip was in the gaming benchmarks.
 

Danny101

TS Guru
If this is twice as fast as my HP Notebook, running an AMD A6-7310 @ 2 Ghz w/4 GB of DDR3 memory and I can get it for $300, then it's business for me. I'll be able to get my work done in a reasonable amount of time.
 
About time, though it's a strange move to introduce the APUs before the CPUs. But then again, Intel has their defunct graphics hardware in most of their laptop units as well, so it makes sense. Of course it remains to be seen how these compete, but on paper they look pretty devastating.
 

Theinsanegamer

TS Evangelist
This is it, what I have been waiting for AMD to really give notebooks a kick in the pants. Budget machines have been stuck on 2 cores and mediocre integrated graphics for far too long.

If AMD can shake it up so you can get a 4 core machine with more graphics performance than any of Intel's integrated solutions without hitting up battery life too hard it'll be great.

These parts are obviously meant for slim machines but they look useful, should have no trouble standing to Intel's very best iGPUs that are usually reserved only for their highest end mobile CPUs
Who said these will be budget chips?
OEMs have a long history of putting AMD chips only in cheap low end machines. Ryzen may be the end of that practice, but I wont hold my breath.

About time, though it's a strange move to introduce the APUs before the CPUs. But then again, Intel has their defunct graphics hardware in most of their laptop units as well, so it makes sense. Of course it remains to be seen how these compete, but on paper they look pretty devastating.
Dude, laptops with iGPU-less CPUs are as rare as hens teeth. There are, maybe, 2 or 3. It makes 0 sense to release a CPU only mobile part given how tiny that market is. Those laptops just use desktop parts. Any laptop that uses a dGPU will still use the iGPU when not gaming to conserve battery life.
 
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Vulcanproject

TS Evangelist
Who said these will be budget chips?
I don't know, I didn't.

By the looks of it these specifically are probably on the upper end, since the boost clocks are quite high. I only alluded to the idea that we might see cheaper machines with quad cores and better graphics than what you usually get for let's say ~$600, where dual core i5 machines still rule the roost.

If it means you can get a Ryzen based quad and graphics that likely beat up HD630 (only in the high end) for that sort of money it'll be excellent news.
 

ZackL04

TS Guru
If this is twice as fast as my HP Notebook, running an AMD A6-7310 @ 2 Ghz w/4 GB of DDR3 memory and I can get it for $300, then it's business for me. I'll be able to get my work done in a reasonable amount of time.
It will probably approach 4x as fast using all threads..
 

yeeeeman

TS Maniac
You are exactly the kind of buyer (and do not take it personally please) that AMD wants to reeducate, because until now people used to think about AMD products as being the worse but bargain alternative.
Ryzen Mobile changes that, it is a HUGE step-up from you have there in your current notebook and it won't be 300$ even after a years time, just because the performance is right up there with the current fastest Intel ULV options like the i7 8500U.
It is a great choice because it gives you top performance on a lower price compared to Intel which is a different league for AMD. Congrats really.
 

Danny101

TS Guru
I know what you're saying, but do understand, I know AMD very well. Since I've been using them almost exclusively since 1995. Starting with a 386DX-40Mhz based system running MS-DOS and Windows 3.11. I wished I'd kept that thing as a starter computer for the kids. I upgraded it to a 486DX-120Mhz in order to play DOOM. I even still have usable software from that era. It was the gaming that drew me into computers and I've learned things from my dad as well. AMD's current chips are now using the same basic schema that Intel was using for years, only because the one they tried didn't work out. Anyways, I usually stay a couple of generations behind in order to keep my costs low. After Ryzen Mobile gets going, I might consider a Bristol Ridge based unit this year since those prices should be falling to my price point, and I'll have a little lift in performance. You may be right about Ryzen Mobile prices not falling even into 2019. I may have to wait until the next generation of Ryzen is unveiled. I think that AMD is set on making the APU the future of computing. The separation of the cpu and gpu may go the way of the dodo bird. Who knows. I will always prefer having the option of a dedicated cpu and a gpu. Although at some point, it may not matter much anymore.