Dropbox is launching a free version of its password manager in April, but with restrictions

Shawn Knight

Posts: 13,073   +130
Staff member
Bottom line: Regardless of whether you use Dropbox, LastPass or any of the other major alternatives, using a password manager is generally a good idea. Such apps and services promote the use of strong passwords and unique credentials for each site or service you use while reducing the chances of you getting locked out of an account by forgetting login details.

Dropbox in the spring of 2020 launched a password manager in beta, eventually rolling it out to paying customers over the summer. Now, the file hosting service is bringing the feature to all users, albeit with a catch.

The Dropbox Passwords app works just like any other major password manager, remembering usernames and passwords across all of your devices so you don’t have to. And starting in April, those with a free Dropbox Basic plan will be able to try a limited version of the app.

The freebie version will let users store up to 50 passwords and sync them across three devices. Dropbox is planning to allow users to securely share passwords with others, but the company didn’t put a timetable on when this extra feature would land.

Last month, rival password manager LastPass announced that starting March 16, free tier users would only be able to use the service on one category of device – either mobile devices or computers.

Images courtesy Nopparat Khokthong, Vitalil Vodolazskyi

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scavengerspc

Posts: 1,079   +1,031
TechSpot Elite
Maybe I need to take some more time with these password managers.

Everyone I have tried ended up being more of a pain in the *** than just keeping my passwords on a flash drive and then copy and paste when needed.
 

bviktor

Posts: 378   +673
They missed the boat, Bitwarden is the clear winner of this LastPass fiasco. 50 passwords, for real? I have 500. I just migrated to Bitwarden yesterday (from LastPass) and it works just great. The import went without a hitch too. It even kept my password folders and all my secure notes too.

When Microsoft Autofill starts working both on Linux and in Firefox, I might give it a try. Till then, Bitwarden for me. Unless they put their stuff behind a paywall too, that is.
 

NeoMorpheus

Posts: 415   +792
Maybe I need to take some more time with these password managers.

Everyone I have tried ended up being more of a pain in the *** than just keeping my passwords on a flash drive and then copy and paste when needed.
I had very good success with BitWarden.

So much that I even pay for their service, even though all I really need is the free tier.
 
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Buhaj47

Posts: 137   +233
I use Keepass with unlimited number of passwords, no reason why anyone would use free Dropbox solution.
 

Edster

Posts: 93   +66
I have good success with BitWarden.

So much that I even pay for their service, even though all I really need is the free tier.

Me too. Their service is not overly expensive (cheap even) so I am paying for it so that hopefully don't they feel the need to apply restriction on free users or have an expensive subscription plan for their business model.

The Dropbox solution would be fine if they have more passwords, but I guess is free tier. It might be tempting for me once is included with their paid plans, but right now I don't need that much cloud storage.
 

amghwk

Posts: 1,015   +926
A password manager is ALWAYS a bad idea. Once it is hacked, it's worse than just one or two of your account information being stolen. Your entire legacy will be at stake.

Nothing is unhackable.
 

amghwk

Posts: 1,015   +926
Thanks to Dropbox's management path change (read: greed), when it started limiting free users the number of devices they can use at one time connected to the same free account, I setup my own NAS and personal cloud server.
 

p51d007

Posts: 2,687   +2,023
They missed the boat, Bitwarden is the clear winner of this LastPass fiasco. 50 passwords, for real? I have 500. I just migrated to Bitwarden yesterday (from LastPass) and it works just great. The import went without a hitch too. It even kept my password folders and all my secure notes too.

When Microsoft Autofill starts working both on Linux and in Firefox, I might give it a try. Till then, Bitwarden for me. Unless they put their stuff behind a paywall too, that is.

Yep, I switched from Lastpass to Bitwarden too. Imported everything, very little change. Works great. See ya later Last Pass
 

dms96960

Posts: 371   +110
I use Keepass with unlimited number of passwords, no reason why anyone would use free Dropbox solution.
Just curious -- on KeePass -- if you are over at a friend's house and wanted to check your email from his laptop, could you do so?

Same with LastPass -- could you do so?

Thanks.
 

NeoMorpheus

Posts: 415   +792
A password manager is ALWAYS a bad idea. Once it is hacked, it's worse than just one or two of your account information being stolen. Your entire legacy will be at stake.

Nothing is unhackable.
Sure, the boys in Ryan's lab can make it hack-proof. But that don't mean we ain't gonna hack it.” ― Pablo Navarro